Accounting

ACCY 111 – Accounting

The preparation, use and analysis of internal and external accounting information.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 6603 • (L1) Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 6605 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ACCY 115 – Fundamentals of Accounting

Financial and management accounting for students intending to advance in accounting and taxation. The course covers introductory accounting for for-profit, public sector and not-for-profit entities.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 111 or approved levels of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Accounting (X) the pair (ACCY 001, 111) in 2016 or earlier;

1/3 • CRN 29015 • Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 29016 • Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ACCY 130 – Accounting for Decision Making

An introduction to accounting for students not intending to advance in accounting or taxation. The course covers the use and social impact of accounting information, both within organisations and in external reporting.

15 pts • (X) ACCY 111, 115

1/3 • CRN 23001 • Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 23002 • (L2) Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 23003 • (L3) Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

ACCY 223 – Management Accounting

The theory and practice of cost and management accounting.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 115, ECON 130

1/3 • CRN 15970 • Mon 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea], Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 204 • Wed, Fri 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 225 – Introduction to Accounting Systems

An Introduction to the study of accounting systems and the role of accountants in this systems environment.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 115, INFO 101

1/3 • CRN 18776 • Tue, Thu 4.30-5.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 15281 • Mon, Wed 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

lab, tut tba

ACCY 231 – Financial Accounting

A preparer's perspective on particular areas of financial reporting, including current New Zealand GAAP and recognition of revenue, expenses, assets and liabilities.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 115; (X) ACCY 221, 222

1/3 • CRN 13069 • Wed, Fri 8.30-9.30 [Pipitea]

3/3 • CRN 13070 • Mon, Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 302 – Advanced Management Accounting

An in-depth analysis of selected topics in cost and management accounting.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 223

1/3 • CRN 15422 • Mon, Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 213 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea], Tue 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 303 – Fraud Auditing

The accountability of external auditors within a judgmental framework, including professional guidelines, technology impacts and current auditing research issues.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 231, COML 204; (C) ACCY 330

Not offered in 2020

ACCY 306 – Data Analytics for Financial Statements

A critical examination of accounting and finance concepts as applied to financial statements of firms, focusing on the interests of equity investors. The course will also consider the value of financial statement analysis to capital markets and communities.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 231 (or 221), FINA/MOFI 201 or FINA 211

2/3 • CRN 220 • Tue 11.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 307 – Government Accounting and Finance

The theoretical basis of government accounting; budgetary theory; the budgetary system of New Zealand government, accounting for local authorities and public enterprise.

15 pts • (P) 15 200-level ACCY pts

Not offered in 2020

ACCY 308 – Advanced Financial Accounting

Current issues in financial accounting and reporting; alternative measurement bases from accounting and economics; the traditional framework of financial statements and other means of reporting.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 231

1/3 • CRN 15424 • Tue, Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 224 • Mon, Wed 4.30-5.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 309 – International Accounting Topics

Accounting standards setting and corporate financial reporting practices in selected countries. Accounting issues affecting multinational enterprises such as foreign exchange translations, transfer pricing, segment reporting, financial statement analysis and harmonisation of accounting standards.

15 pts • (P) 15 200-level ACCY pts

Not offered in 2020

ACCY 314 – Accounting and Society

The study of accounting in a social and political context. Topics include accounting and the environment, ethics, industrial relations, social responsibility and philosophy.

15 pts • (P) 15 200-level ACCY pts

Not offered in 2020

ACCY 317 – Accounting Information Systems

A study of the systems that support the business measurement, financial reporting and compliance objectives of an organisation. Identification, analysis and control of risks associated with the use of information technology in accounting information systems. Introduction to systems audit and assurance.

15 pts • (P) either ACCY 225 or (INFO 101, 15 200-level ACCY pts)

Not offered in 2020

ACCY 330 – Auditing

Concepts and practice of auditing.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 231, COML 204; (X) ACCY 232, ACCY 303 before 2011

1/3 • CRN 18308 • Wed 11.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 19736 • Mon, Wed 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

Actuarial Science

ACTS 201 – Financial Mathematics

Mathematical principles of compound interest, geometric series and annuities; valuation of loans; returns on financial transactions; duration and immunisation theory; term structure of interest rates; stochastic interest rates.

15 pts • (P) QUAN 102 (or STAT 193 or MATH 177), QUAN 111 (or MATH 141/142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 29082 • Wed, Fri 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

ACTS 301 – Actuarial Science

This is a capstone course for the Actuarial Science major that brings together skills and knowledge from prior courses to develop an understanding of their practical application in the actuarial profession. It provides grounding in the mathematical techniques that can be used to model risks and contingencies.

15 pts • (P) ACTS 201, ECON 141, MATH 277

2/3 • CRN 27135 • Mon, Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ACTS 336 – General Insurance Techniques

This course provides the mathematical foundation necessary to set premiums and reserves for general insurance contracts. It provides an overview of the various techniques used in general insurance, including loss distributions, ruin theory, credibility, run-off triangles and general insurance modelling.

15 pts • (P) MATH 277

2/3 • CRN 31125 • Mon, Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

STAT 335 – Statistical Models for Actuarial Science

This course introduces a range of models used in actuarial science, including Markov chains, Markov processes and transition, survival models and estimation with graduation methods and binomial models for mortality.

15 pts • (P) MATH 277

1/3 • CRN 27136 • Mon, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 11-12 [Kelburn]

Animation and Visual Effects

DSDN 132 – Animation and Visual Effects I / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Atataunaki I

This course introduces students to the practice of digital asset creation and animation for narrative media. Students will develop basic skill sets central to animation and visual effects production, including polygonal modelling, surface shading, texturing, lighting, and animation using 3D digital content creation software. Practical skills are complemented with design principles and technical concepts related to this studio practice.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

1/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 30003 • ^ tba [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 201 – Animation and Visual Effects II / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata II

This course explores 3D design principles unique to creating animation and visual effects media, and techniques of 3D design. Students will create a series of digital artefacts for the screen. Tutorials cover development methods specific to digital content, with an emphasis on engaging in an effective design process. In lab sessions students will use 3D modelling software and 2D image manipulation software to generate compelling and innovative visual imagery that demonstrates an understanding of animation and visual effects media.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 132; CGRA 151 or acceptance into the ANFX major

1/3 • CRN 31161 • Wed 3.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 211 – Character Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Kiripuaki I

This course offers an introduction to animated storytelling through the art of character animation. We survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, from large scale studio features to experimental auteur films. In response students will create their own animated films by designing, building and rigging characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students will gain insight into animated film production workflows and will acquire the technical skills to bring their story ideas to fruition. This course will be offered for the first time in 2020.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 132; and 15 further points from the BDI or BAS Schedules

2/3 • CRN 31162 • Mon 5.30-6.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 4.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 221 – Digital 2D Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua I

This course introduces digital 2D and frame-by-frame techniques in modern animation practice. Historical and contemporary examples will be studied including classic feature films, independent shorts, music videos, and video games. Students will apply basic animation principles and learn introductory 2D techniques within a digital workflow, suitable to professional or personal practice.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses

2/3 • CRN 32097 • ^ Mon 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 3.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 231 – Stop Motion Animation / Pakiwaituhi Whakatū Nekehanga

The course explores techniques in stop-motion puppet construction, onset lighting, and animation. Students will build a fully articulated puppet and light and animate it using a combination of established industry practices such as digital and in-camera frame-by-frame techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses

Not offered in 2020

ANFX 271 – History of Animation and Visual Effects / Hītōria Pakiwaituhi, Mariko Ataata

This course explores how technology and filmmaking have utilised visual effects as an integral storytelling tool since the earliest days of cinema. Students will explore various forms including the cinema of attractions, the phenomenon of the uncanny valley and international precedents, the contemporary high-fantasy of blockbuster Hollywood films, and finally the future of the form.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ANFX 272 – Fictional Narratives – Storytelling for Design / Kōrero Pakiwaitara – Pakiwaitara Hei Hoahoa

This course explores the ideation and practical process of writing and visual development for animated media. Core principles such as structure, plot, character, world building and personal vision are explored alongside the way in which technology and transmedia practices are increasingly shaping storytelling.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 32001 • Tue 3.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

1/3 • CRN 32107 • Tue 3.30-5pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 32108 • Tue 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 301 – Animation and Visual Effects III / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata III

Advanced topics in animation will be explored in this course, particularly around newly emerging technologies and procedural processes. Students will have the opportunity to conduct research, informing their own path for exploration in one of three areas: data acquisition, procedural modelling or asset development. These explorations will be put into practice – incorporating this knowledge in a short production.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 201

1/3 • CRN 32002 • Tue, Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 311 – Character Animation II / Pakiwaituhi ā-Kiripuaki II

This course builds on Character Animation I and continues to examine animation through the art of character animation. Students survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, focusing on contemporary animation. Students will design, build, and rig characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students delve deeper into animated film production workflows and will refine the technical skills required to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 211

Not offered in 2020

Antarctic Research Centre

See also School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences

ESCI 111 – The Earth System: An Introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Sciences

An introduction to fundamental concepts in Physical Geography and Earth Sciences. The physical processes that shape and have shaped the Earth are the focus of this course. An important emphasis is on human interaction with the environment. This course provides fundamental knowledge for understanding our environment and a platform for further study. Field work in the Wellington area is included.

15 pts • (X) GEOG 111 (D) GEOG 111

1/3 • CRN 9469 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 112 – Fundamentals of Geology

An introduction to geology, Earth and planetary history, rock forming processes and geological time through the study of minerals, fossils, rocks and geological maps.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 15147 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 132 – Antarctica: Unfreezing the Continent

A broad introduction to Antarctica, including its history, exploration, weather, geology, fauna and management. Its role in the global climate system is emphasised. This course is primarily designed for non-science majors.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 9062 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 201 – Climate Change and New Zealand's Future

The Climate Change Research Institute in conjunction with the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences is offering this summer course. Designed for science and non-science students, this course provides a summary of current knowledge on climate change, the evidence and its uncertainties, and possible climate scenarios for the next 50 to 500 years. The course also discusses the influence of climate change on NZ’s society, economy and environment, and governmental strategies for adaptation and mitigation. The course is taught by staff from VUW, NIWA (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited), Ministry of the Environment, and Public Policy Research.

20 pts • (P) 30 points

3/3 • CRN 11341 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 202 – Sedimentology and Palaeontology

An introduction to features of sedimentary strata and fossils that form the basis for interpreting the geological history of a region from field observations and drill cores. The course includes flow channel studies of sediment movement in the laboratory, and a weekend field trip to gain experience in describing sedimentary strata and collecting fossils for subsequent study.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

1/3 • CRN 15137 • Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 203 – Earth Structures and Deformation

An introduction to the fields of structural geology, tectonics and solid earth geophysics with the goal of describing the structure of the earth and the mechanisms by which it deforms. The laboratory component emphasises modern field-based methods of collecting, processing and analysing geological and geophysical data.

20 pts • (P) (ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent) OR (ESCI 112 (or 111), MATH 142)

1/3 • CRN 15141 • Wed 1-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 204 – Petrology and Microscopy

This course examines all common major rock types and introduces crystallography as it pertains to optical mineralogy, with examples of a variety of common minerals and rocks in hand sample and under the microscope. The course covers the origins of common minerals and rocks and the conditions and processes that form them.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

2/3 • CRN 15138 • Tue, Thu 9-12 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 241 – Introductory Field Geology

An introduction to field techniques in geology held at the Geology department's field station at Onekaka, near Takaka, Northwest Nelson. In 2020 this field course is offered 22-29 February 2020, and/or 11-18 April 2020 (depending on enrolments/staff availability), and/or 18-25 April 2020 (also depending on enrolments/staff availability). Students will be instructed to sign up for one of these offerings.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

block dates/3 • CRN 17287 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 301 – Global Change: Earth Processes and History

A study of modern and past Earth environments and the key processes that have shaped them. This course focuses on understanding and interpreting evidence from the geological record for environmental change and using this knowledge to help predict future variability, with specific focus on Antarctica, Southwest Pacific and New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 202; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further points from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193); (C) ESCI 341 or GEOG 323

1/3 • CRN 15139 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 302 – Tectonics and Structural Geology

An introduction to the fundamental concepts, principles and methods in global tectonics and structural geology. The laboratory part of the course emphasises practical methods of structural analysis and interpretation based on outcrop, microscopic and geophysical data sets. It includes two all-day field trips.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 203, 341, 342; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193); (X) ESCI 340

2/3 • CRN 15145 • Mon, Thu 12-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 303 – Petrology and Geochemistry

The course introduces fundamental concepts, principles and methods in geochemistry and the application of geochemical tools to geochronology, igneous, metamorphic rocks and processes. The formation, classification and geochemical behaviour of elements, isotopes and anaylytical methods in geochemistry. The application of geochemical tools is examined and the principles of geochronology applied.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 204; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 15140 • Mon, Fri 9-12 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 304 – Petroleum Geology

This course introduces all aspects of the composition, origin and accumulation of hydrocarbons and the main exploration procedures and analytical techniques. It covers concepts such as play and sequence stratigraphy, before focusing on more detailed aspects of reservoir and seal types. Types of petroleum accumulation are described, ranging from standard oil and gas, to unconventional accumulations such as gas hydrates and shale oil and gas. Carbon capture and storage are also introduced along with discussion of issues such as fracking and the future of oil and gas. Practical work comprises exercises that introduce petroleum analytical techniques and are designed to foster an understanding of how exploration proceeds.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 301; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

Not offered in 2020

ESCI 305 – Applied Geophysics

This course covers the use of geophysical data acquisition, processing and interpretation for exploring the Earth's interior. Topics include gravity, electrical and magnetic surveying and the fields of simple bodies, refraction seismology, reflection survey data interpretation, the use of GPS for surveying and geodesy, and the use of surface waves for determination of shear wave velocities for engineering and seismic hazard purposes.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 15146 • ^ Mon, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 341 – Sedimentary Field Geology

Field sedimentary mapping in the hills east of Martinborough, covering the basics of mapping sedimentary sequences in an area of simple deformation. A map, cross- section and stratigraphic columns are prepared and an environmental analysis of the section is produced in the field. Only one stream will be offered in 2020. This will run from 12-19 February 2020. Students will be required to attend a half-day workshop on 10 February 2020 in CO304.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 241; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 28413 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 342 – Structural Field Geology

Field mapping and analysis of geological structures, including folds, thrust and active strike-slip faults. Students measure structural data, produce maps and cross-sections of an area on the Kaikoura coast, South Island, which provides a dramatic window into the tectonic evolution of NZ's landmass over the last 100 million years. Only one stream will be offered in 2020. This will run from 21-28 February 2020. All students will be required to attend a half-day workshop on 31 January 2020.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 203, 241; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 15142 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 343 – Volcanic Field Geology

Methods and techniques for studying volcanic geology in the field. This course runs from Whakapapa in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) of the central North Island. It examines the products of andesite and basalt eruptions from the Tongariro National Park volcanoes and some rhyolitic products of Taupo volcano. The course takes place in the mid-trimester break (18-25 April 2020).

10 pts • (P) ESCI 204, 241; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 17289 • ^ [Kelburn]

lab, tut tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 344 – Field Geophysics

Methods and techniques for field geophysical surveys. Also taught as GPHS 344. This field trip is held in the mid- trimester break (13-17 April 2020) along with supporting lectures.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (C) ESCI 305

block dates/3 • CRN 17288 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 349 – Earth Sciences – International Field Course

This international field course in earth sciences aims to examine key geographical, geological and/or geophysical localities. The course will offer a variable but unique insight, understanding and experience of earth science in the field beyond that which already exists in New Zealand. This course is offered in alternate years and will run in the USA from 18 November 2019 to 18 December 2019. Numbers are limited, apply by 1 April 2019. An extra fee beyond that for the course, covering travel and subsistence costs applies and is to be met by the student.

20 pts • (P) 60 points of 200-level ESCI or GEOG including either ESCI 241 or GEOG 223; (X) ESCI 449

Not offered in 2020

Anthropology (Cultural)

ANTH 101 – Foundations of Society and Culture

This course introduces students to the subject by focusing on how anthropologists understand and explain social and cultural differences. We will explore a range of contemporary topics through a set of key questions that form the foundation of the discipline and are essential to both further study in Anthropology and an appreciation of world cultures.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 266 • Mon, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 102 – Social and Cultural Diversity

This course introduces students to the study of social and cultural diversity by exploring culture and its role in our lives. Topics include ritual, symbolism, the body, exchange, belief, inequality, globalisation, kinship, gender and class. Case studies are drawn from New Zealand, the Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 267 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 201 – Gender, Sexuality and Kinship

This course examines anthropological approaches to kinship, sexuality and gender. It will explore the shifting social norms surrounding gender, sexuality, the family and relatedness across diverse cultural settings. It will reveal how practices of gender, sexuality and kinship intersect with new reproductive technologies, media, nationalism, capitalism, colonisation, class and race.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further points from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 30010 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 204 – Modern Anthropological Thought

This course explores inspiring and influential ideas in recent Anthropology by discussing the writings of some of the discipline's greatest thinkers. Among the topics considered are: symbolism and the interpretation of cultures; culture and globalisation; ethnography and morality; culture and history; culture and evolution; culture and power; culture and experience.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts; from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 271 • Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 208 – Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development

This course will examine the cultural encounters and human experiences that emerge out of contemporary human rights regimes, humanitarian interventions, development projects, and global politics. Taking case studies from a range of different cultural settings, it will focus on how culture and politics shapes these global practices, and how different groups understand, respond to and challenge these interventions.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

ANTH 209 – Conflict and Reconciliation

This course focuses on anthropological approaches to conflict and reconciliation, exploring the relationship between the two, and considering how we as anthropologists approach these topics at local, national, and international levels. These themes are addressed through material that examines societies in conflict, post-conflict peace-building, nationalism, and state building. The course will also examine theories of social suffering and studies that explore local interpretations of history, politics, violence, and power. A variety of ethnographies will be considered.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 274 • Mon, Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 210 – Environmental Anthropology

This course explores human relationships with ecological and material environments. It will examine diverse cultural perceptions of and approaches to the environment, the relationship between nature and culture, and anthropology’s contribution to contemporary ecological and climate debates.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

ANTH 213 – Ritual and Collective Life

How do communities give meaning and order to the world? What binds us together in collective relations with one another? This course offers an introduction to the anthropology of ritual. It will consider the ways rituals give order to social life, how they are used as public performances, how they generate political power, and how they are used to challenge established modes of living and being. The course examines a range of examples from New Zealand and beyond.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 13073 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 215 – Special Topic: Capitalism, Culture, and Inequality

This course introduces a variety of topics associated with economic anthropology by examining the various forms that capitalism takes within different cultural contexts, how it produces inequalities, and the varied ways that people and cultures respond to, appropriate and resist the economic systems of today's global world.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; X ANTH 315 (in 2017- 18)

1/3 • CRN 13112 • Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 301 – Science, Technology and Culture

Science and technology are fundamental parts of all cultures. In this course, we examine how diverse sciences and technologies shape peoples’ interpretations of the world, their relations with one another, and their understandings of themselves. Considering issues like the relationship between indigenous knowledges and science, robotics, social media, medicine and biotechnology, and climate and environment, we ask what science is, how technology functions, and what place science and technology have in our own lives and societies.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ANTH 314 in 2018-2019

1/3 • CRN 32069 • Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 307 – Medical Anthropology

This course explores what roles our cultural beliefs and practices play in shaping our understandings of health, wellbeing, illness and medicine. We ask how culture mediates our experiences of our bodies, our emotions and diseases, and how local and global inequalities affect health outcome. The course takes a comparative approach, asking students to consider cultural approaches to disease categories, illness experiences, and systems of healing in their own societies and communities as well as in a range of globally diverse settings.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299; (X) ANTH 315 (2011-2014)

2/3 • CRN 27015 • Tue 12-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 308 – Anthropology in Oceania

The major theme running through this course will be deep engagements between indigenous cultural orders and western political, economic and religious systems. Most of the ethnographic examples will be from the South Pacific but we will also explore more generally relationships between globalisation and localisation. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299

Not offered in 2020

ANTH 312 – The Challenges of Ethnography

This course will explore how anthropologists carry out research, the challenges of conducting ethnographic research, and the kinds of knowledge ethnography allows us to build. It will consider the ethics and politics of researching people’s lives and representing their communities. It will also reveal how anthropologists and their research partners work collaboratively in the production of knowledge, and how is this knowledge applied in communities, workplaces and governments. This course will take a practice-based approach to learning, and will also explore case studies from New Zealand and beyond.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

Not offered in 2020

ANTH 314 – Special Topic: Social Lives of Buildings

Buildings participate in the creation, reproduction and transformation of social relations; like people, our buildings have social lives. Buildings are forms of technology, but they are also deeply meaningful constructions which shape us as we shape them. This course adopts a broad comparative view of the ways that a wide range of buildings – from tents to castles, tree-houses to retirement villages – participate in the making of social lives.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299

1/3 • CRN 6102 • Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

seminar tba

ANTH 315 – Special Topic: Anthropology for Liberation

How can Anthropology advance human emancipation from racism, gender inequality, class disparities, and other forms of oppression and exploitation? In this course we will consider what it means to approach anthropology from a decolonising perspective, and explore what an anthropology for liberation might look like in theory and practice, drawing on examples from Asia, Oceania, and Latin America.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299; X ANTH 215 in 2017

2/3 • CRN 6103 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 316 – Visual Anthropology

This course will consider the use of visual media in both the practice and production of ethnography by examining how visual representations are both products of cultural norms, values and actions and Considering the development of visual anthropology, this course will ask questions such as: what does seeing visual Anthropology, the analysis of scripts and picture mean? How are visual and other sensory media used to communicate? How do visual representations influence social relationships and actions? Can visual anthropology help produce a more publically accessible anthropology? This course may include visits to research institutes in Wellington.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

1/3 • CRN 13080 • Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 317 – Migration, Culture and Identity

In this course we explore migration as both empirical phenomenon and subject of anthropological study. We compare the intentions, outcomes and experiences of migrants, considering citizenship, belonging, and the nation-state, and look critically at recent models of transnationalism and diaspora which have challenged earlier ideas about migration and culture.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

Not offered in 2020

Applied Linguistics

See also Linguistics and TESOL

LALS 201 – Understanding Language Learning and Teaching

This course examines the processes involved in learning first and second/foreign languages, including the study of bilingualism, focusing on the implications for language learners and teachers. The course is useful for students who wish to optimise their own language learning practices and/or pursue a career in language education.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) LING 223

1/3 • CRN 28266 • Mon, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

TSOL 202 – Vocabulary and Grammar for TESOL

The course explores the key features and patterns of English vocabulary and grammar from the perspective of the challenges they present to learners and teachers. It examines the implications for planning teaching and assessing learning. Students will evaluate the content of courses and published teaching materials.

20 pts • (P) 40 points; (X) ALIN 301

1/3 • CRN 28267 • Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

TSOL 203 – Text and Cultural Context

The course explores the language demands of written and spoken genres at school, as well as how the teacher can meet these demands. The course considers the language of schooling and the learning and teaching of languages across cultural contexts.

20 pts • (P) 40 points; (X) ALIN 302

2/3 • CRN 28268 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

TSOL 301 – Language Teaching: Principles to Practice

This course aims to develop an applied understanding of principles for language teaching and learning. It explores materials selection and design, and procedures and techniques for teaching language lessons, focusing on teaching the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Course members will participate in peer teaching and peer observation.

20 pts • (P) LALS201 and TSOL 202 or 203; 20 pts in language other than English or an equivalent second language learning experience; (X) ALIN 201

1/3 • CRN 28269 • Tue 4-6pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

TSOL 302 – Critical Perspectives on the Second Language Curriculum

This course explores the ways in which a second language curriculum is designed and developed to provide relevant learning goals, effective learning opportunities in different contexts, and assessment of how well the opportunities have been taken up and the goals have been achieved. It also examines the social and cultural impact of language education policy, and the role of English in the world today.

20 pts • (P) LING 101 or 111; 60 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule or from the BTeach Schedule (X) ALIN 202

Not offered in 2020

TSOL 303 – Special Topic: Language and Creativity

This course critically evaluates the concept of creativity and its role in language learning, language teaching, and intercultural communication. The course addresses why speakers use creative language and how creative language can be applied to language teaching pedagogy.

20 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 32216 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

Architecture

SARC 111 – Introduction to Design Processes / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Mahi Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce concepts and processes used in human environments. These concepts and processes are examined in relation to the physical, social and cultural contexts in which designers operate.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18165 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 112 – Design Processes / Ngā Tukanga

Studio-based projects explore how abstract concepts of formal and spatial composition can be used to create habitable places. Discipline-specific modules introduce concepts and processes which are particular to architecture, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts • (P) SARC 111

2/3 • CRN 18166 • tba [Kelburn]

SARC 121 – Introduction to Built Environment Technology / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Whare Hangahanga

The scientific and technological contexts within which the built environment is developed. An introduction to the forces of nature, structures, construction, environmental science and how users interact with buildings. Reference will be made to historical as well as contemporary technologies.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18167 • Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 122 – Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Tikanga Nama

Basic applied algebra, physics and statistics relevant to the study of design and the built environment.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18168 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 131 – Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Whakaora i Te Taiao Hangahanga

The definitions and macro contexts of sustainability, emphasising the roles, responsibilities and opportunities for professionals in the designed and built environment. The course covers climate and microclimate, resources, materials production, environmental impact and social equity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18169 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

SARC 151 – Introduction to Design History and Theory / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho i te ao Whakarākei

Introduction to the major historical and theoretical influences shaping the contemporary built environment.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18170 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 161 – Introduction to Design Communication / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi Ngātahi i Te Ao Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce principles, media and techniques used in the representation of three-dimensional design concepts. The studio component emphasises conventions for describing formal and spatial subjects in scaled drawings, physical models, digital models and text.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18171 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 162 – Design Communication / Te Whakarākei me te Mahi Ngātahi

Studio-based projects explore principles, media and techniques used in the representation of two and three-dimensional design concepts. Students are introduced to the communication conventions of architecture, building science, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18172 • tba [Kelburn]

ARCI 211 – Architecture Design I / Te Whakarākei Whare I

Studio-based design projects introduce the issues, concepts, vocabularies and strategies of architectural design. Exploration and representation of architectural ideas in a range of media.

15 pts • (P) BAS Part 1

1/3 • CRN 18525 • ^ Mon 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Mon, Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ARCI 212 – Architecture Design Integration I / Te Whakakotahitanga o ngā Tikanga Whakarākei Whare I

Studio-based projects explore people-environment relationships, integrating knowledge gained in the Human Environmental Science course. Architecture is examined as a means for modifying human environments in ways that affect comfort, efficiency, mood and meaning.

30 pts • (P) ARCI 211; (C) SARC 223

2/3 • CRN 18526 • Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 251 – History and Theory of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho

Introduction to the development of architectural theory and its application to the recent history of built form.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

1/3 • CRN 18527 • Tue, Fri 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 232 – Sustainable Architecture / Ngā Whare Toitū

The philosophical, conceptual and contextual basis of sustainable and regenerative design. Content includes material on the ecological and environmental challenges to society in the present and future; resource stewardship and the effective utilisation of materials; working with nature and natural systems; well-being enhancement; green, sustainable and regenerative design.

15 pts • (P) SARC 131; (X) SARC 232

2/3 • CRN 18479 • Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 251 – History of Building Technology / Ngā Whanaketanga a te Ao Hangahanga

The historical, social and economic development of construction methods, materials and systems. The impact, relevance and importance of the scientific, industrial and information technology revolutions. Trends in the international development of building technology, with a primary focus on New Zealand.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121 or 151

2/3 • CRN 18480 • Mon, Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 262 – Building Project Management Cost Planning / Te Whakahaere me te Whakamahere ā-utu i ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare

This course examines concepts of building cost planning and its theory and application in New Zealand. An overview of the principles of estimation, the standard method of measurement, schedules of quantities, elemental analysis, IT cost estimation and financial analysis.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

2/3 • CRN 18482 • Tue 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 211 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 112 or SARC 112

Not offered in 2020

SARC 212 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Te Waihanga me Ngā Momo Hangarau

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry and their creative application in the design of furniture and furnished environments.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 112 or SARC 112

2/3 • CRN 18457 • Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 221 – Building Materials and Construction / Te Waihanga me ngā Momo Rauemi

Buildings are studied as assemblages of distinct yet interrelated systems. Students explore basic materials and methods of construction, gaining insight to structural and other performance outcomes. Construction is discussed as a dimension in the overall design activity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 131

1/3 • CRN 18456 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

SARC 222 – Structural Systems / Te Whakamahinga o ngā Rauemi

Introduction to the basic structural principles and material properties that underpin the fabric of natural and constructed environments. The course presents the basic requirements for structural systems; structural form and proportion; equilibrium; strength of materials; bending and shear; combined stresses; elasticity, plasticity and ductility; elastic deformation; buckling; structural design principles; and, elementary soil mechanics.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 122, 131

1/3 • CRN 18455 • Tue, Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 223 – Human Environmental Science / Te Āhurutanga o te Taiao

The methods of achieving building environmental conditions that relate to the requirements of building users. The course covers climatic analysis and specifications of the environmental performance of buildings, together with the thermal, visual, acoustic, and aerodynamic principles of building elements; plus the services systems required to control and maintain these conditions.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121; (X) BILD 223; SARC 281 in 2014-2017

2/3 • CRN 18395 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 224 – Fire Safety Design / Te Tinihanga a Mahuika

Basic principles of design to ensure the safety of people in buildings during a fire. The implications for building form, layout and interiors on escape route design, statutory requirements, and alternative solutions as means of compliance.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

Not offered in 2020

SARC 233 – Environment and Behaviour / Ngā Huatanga o te Taiao

Study of the interaction between human behaviour and the design of the physical environment related to age, gender, culture and occupation. Content scopes across physiological, psychological, social and cultural aspects and activity patterns.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

Not offered in 2020

SARC 252 – Building Heritage Conservation / Te Tiaki i ngā Whare Toitū

An introduction to building conservation with emphasis on New Zealand's architectural heritage. The course introduces systems of assessment, interpretation, management, and documentation of culturally significant buildings. Attention is given to issues raised by contemporary modification of buildings and implications on historic integrity and/or authenticity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

Not offered in 2020

SARC 261 – Communication / Ngā Kaupapa Hangarau

Studio-based course introduces and develops the representation of design concepts of projects, with a focus on drawing and modelling by means of analogue and digital media. Emphasis is placed on developing effective graphic communication techniques for design and implementation.

15 pts • (P) SARC 161 and 162

2/3 • CRN 18348 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 311 – Architecture Design II / Te Whakarākei Whare II

Studio-based contemporary design issues related to the professional specialisations and research interests of academic staff. Introduction to design as a research-led activity and as a research methodology.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212

1/3 • CRN 18528 • Tue, Fri 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 312 – Architecture Design Integration Capstone / Te Whakakotahitanga o ngā Tikanga-Tūtohu o te Whakarākei Whare

Studio-based design projects explore the relationship between architectural concepts, structural systems, materials and construction techniques, integrating knowledge gained in the construction course. Design is presented as an integrated problem-solving process, which results in a creative synthesis of concept, aesthetics, function and technology.

30 pts • (P) ARCI 311, SARC 222 (C) SARC 321

2/3 • CRN 18529 • Mon, Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 331 – Sustainable and Regenerative Design / Te Whakarauoratanga o ngā Mahi Whakarākei

Explores sustainable and regenerative design principles and applications across a range of designed and built environments. Students are taught to operate at the leading edge of theoretical and philosophical thinking in the field and to explore and employ critical thinking and innovative solutions.

15 pts • (P) BILD 232; (X) SARC 331

1/3 • CRN 18485 • Wed 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 361 – Project Management / Ngā Kaupapa Whakahaere

The theory, practice and current technologies of project management from implementation through to delivery, including project constraints, cost planning and control, critical path, consultation, administration and quality control.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC; (X) SARC 361

2/3 • CRN 18486 • Tue 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 364 – Building Code Compliance / Ngā Ture Whakaruruhau

Means of compliance with the New Zealand Building Code, building on technical knowledge gained in other courses. Means of compliance are: Acceptable Solutions, Verification Methods and Certification, and Performance Based Design.

15 pts • (P) One of LAND/SARC 221; (X) SARC 364, SARC 464

1/3 • CRN 18477 • Wed, Fri 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 311 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Mahi Whakaaturanga

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) ARCI/INTA/LAND 212 or BILD 232 or INDN 212

1/3 • CRN 18294 • Mon 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 312 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Tikanga me ngā Tukanga Waihanga Taputapu Whare

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry.

15 pts • (P) SARC 212

1/3 • CRN 18295 • Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 320 – Topic in Digital Computation / Tātai Hangarau

.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2020

SARC 321 – Construction / Te Mahi Waihanga

Medium-scale building construction with relevant building materials, key elements, construction technologies, construction sequences and building processes.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

2/3 • CRN 18296 • Mon, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Mon, Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 323 – Colour, Pattern, Light / Ngā Āhuatanga o te Ata me te Pō

Study of colour, pattern and lighting concepts and technologies and their meaning, role and creative applications.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18297 • Wed 2.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 328 – Topic in Current Research in Architecture / Ngā Rangahau o te Wā i te Mahi Whakarākei / Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons, including film, digital and heritage representations of prisons. International examples will be drawn on, but there will be particular attention paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

1/3 • CRN 32133 • Wed 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 351 – Urban Design Theory and Practice / Te Mahi me ngā Kōrero o te Ao Kikokiko

Introduction to the history, theory and practice of urban design. Conceptual tools and practices for analyzing, designing and implementing change in the built environment of cities.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

1/3 • CRN 18299 • Tue, Fri 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 352 – Pacific Designed Environments / Ngā Taiao o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa

Introduction to issues relating to designed and built environments of the Pacific region. Examination of contemporary conditions within a wider spatial and historical framework. In addition to a central focus on the settlement of Aotearoa/New Zealand, course material extends to other cultures within the greater Pacific rim.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

2/3 • CRN 18300 • Tue 3-5pm [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 353 – History of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero o Mua o Te Mahi Whakarākei

Examines paradigm shifts in architectural thinking. Course material emphasises enduring examples of great architecture which reflect the prevailing social and cultural standards of their respective periods.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

Not offered in 2020

SARC 354 – Heritage Conservation / Ngā Mahi Tiaki i ngā Whare Whakaniko

This course introduces the why, what and how of heritage conservation. Historic and contemporary approaches to heritage conservation are discussed with recent case studies (including building visits) used as vehicles for the discussion. The purpose and role of a Conservation Plan is explored. Research methods for eliciting historical information specific to a building or interior are introduced and practised. Methods of assessing heritage significance and value and of making recommendations for conservation activity are explored.

15 pts • (P) 30 pts 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC; (X) SARC 454

1/3 • CRN 18302 • Mon 3.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 362 – Introduction to Practice and Management / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi me Te Whakahaere

Management and procurement/development, examining the theories and ideas that underpin planning, organising, directing and controlling the use of resources over time. Topics include the principles of management, organisational development, basic finance, costing, development feasibility, valuation theory and quantitative analysis relevant to the construction industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

1/3 • CRN 18304 • Mon, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 363 – Digital Representation and Documentation / Te Mahi a te Ao Hangarau

Computer applications as aids to visualisation and information management.

15 pts • (P) One of LAND/SARC 221; (X) SARC 463

Not offered in 2020

SARC 365 – Drawing / He Tuhituhi

Studio-based course covering creative and interpretive aspects of drawing with an emphasis on developing analytical and critical interrogation through manual graphic processes and across a range of subjects, media types and applied subjects. Discussed as principles and expanded upon in application, are the conventions and standards of architectural representation common to drawing practice.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 211

1/3 • CRN 18287 • ^ Thu 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 371 – International Field Study / Te Mahi a te Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed spaces and sites with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the historical and cultural contexts they are part of and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC pts; (X) SARC 471

3/3 • CRN 23053 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 386 – Special Topic: Retail Experience Architectural Design

Investigate the future of retail design relevant to the 21st century, including research concepts underlying ethical branding, products and scripting of customer journeys. Develop a design proposal for the composition and atmosphere of retail space providing extraordinary customer experience for a brand and its products.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212 or BILD 251 or INTA 212 or LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18293 • Wed 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 387 – Independent Study / Kaupapa Rangahau Motuhake

This course is a supervised programme of research and study on selected themes. Independent Study Projects are available under exceptional circumstances and must be approved by the Head of School.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 23176 • tba [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 18333 • tba [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 32233 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 388 – Psychology and Behaviour in the Built Environment / Te Mātai Hinengaro me te Whanonga i ngā Whare Hangahanga

Application of psychological theory, principles and research to the study of human interaction with the built environment across a range of settings. This course focuses on how to improve usability, health, well-being and work performance in relationship to space and place. The course covers human and environment interaction theory, systems theory, psychology and design research methods, consequences of poorly informed design decisions and environmental stressors.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc schedules (X) SARC 384, 484 (2017-2019)

Not offered in 2020

Architecture History and Theory

SARC 111 – Introduction to Design Processes / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Mahi Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce concepts and processes used in human environments. These concepts and processes are examined in relation to the physical, social and cultural contexts in which designers operate.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18165 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 112 – Design Processes / Ngā Tukanga

Studio-based projects explore how abstract concepts of formal and spatial composition can be used to create habitable places. Discipline-specific modules introduce concepts and processes which are particular to architecture, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts • (P) SARC 111

2/3 • CRN 18166 • tba [Kelburn]

SARC 121 – Introduction to Built Environment Technology / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Whare Hangahanga

The scientific and technological contexts within which the built environment is developed. An introduction to the forces of nature, structures, construction, environmental science and how users interact with buildings. Reference will be made to historical as well as contemporary technologies.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18167 • Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 122 – Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Tikanga Nama

Basic applied algebra, physics and statistics relevant to the study of design and the built environment.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18168 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 131 – Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Whakaora i Te Taiao Hangahanga

The definitions and macro contexts of sustainability, emphasising the roles, responsibilities and opportunities for professionals in the designed and built environment. The course covers climate and microclimate, resources, materials production, environmental impact and social equity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18169 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

SARC 151 – Introduction to Design History and Theory / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho i te ao Whakarākei

Introduction to the major historical and theoretical influences shaping the contemporary built environment.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18170 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 161 – Introduction to Design Communication / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi Ngātahi i Te Ao Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce principles, media and techniques used in the representation of three-dimensional design concepts. The studio component emphasises conventions for describing formal and spatial subjects in scaled drawings, physical models, digital models and text.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18171 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 162 – Design Communication / Te Whakarākei me te Mahi Ngātahi

Studio-based projects explore principles, media and techniques used in the representation of two and three-dimensional design concepts. Students are introduced to the communication conventions of architecture, building science, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18172 • tba [Kelburn]

ARCI 211 – Architecture Design I / Te Whakarākei Whare I

Studio-based design projects introduce the issues, concepts, vocabularies and strategies of architectural design. Exploration and representation of architectural ideas in a range of media.

15 pts • (P) BAS Part 1

1/3 • CRN 18525 • ^ Mon 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Mon, Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ARCI 212 – Architecture Design Integration I / Te Whakakotahitanga o ngā Tikanga Whakarākei Whare I

Studio-based projects explore people-environment relationships, integrating knowledge gained in the Human Environmental Science course. Architecture is examined as a means for modifying human environments in ways that affect comfort, efficiency, mood and meaning.

30 pts • (P) ARCI 211; (C) SARC 223

2/3 • CRN 18526 • Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 251 – History and Theory of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho

Introduction to the development of architectural theory and its application to the recent history of built form.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

1/3 • CRN 18527 • Tue, Fri 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 251 – History of Building Technology / Ngā Whanaketanga a te Ao Hangahanga

The historical, social and economic development of construction methods, materials and systems. The impact, relevance and importance of the scientific, industrial and information technology revolutions. Trends in the international development of building technology, with a primary focus on New Zealand.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121 or 151

2/3 • CRN 18480 • Mon, Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 211 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 112 or SARC 112

Not offered in 2020

SARC 212 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Te Waihanga me Ngā Momo Hangarau

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry and their creative application in the design of furniture and furnished environments.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 112 or SARC 112

2/3 • CRN 18457 • Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 221 – Building Materials and Construction / Te Waihanga me ngā Momo Rauemi

Buildings are studied as assemblages of distinct yet interrelated systems. Students explore basic materials and methods of construction, gaining insight to structural and other performance outcomes. Construction is discussed as a dimension in the overall design activity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 131

1/3 • CRN 18456 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

SARC 222 – Structural Systems / Te Whakamahinga o ngā Rauemi

Introduction to the basic structural principles and material properties that underpin the fabric of natural and constructed environments. The course presents the basic requirements for structural systems; structural form and proportion; equilibrium; strength of materials; bending and shear; combined stresses; elasticity, plasticity and ductility; elastic deformation; buckling; structural design principles; and, elementary soil mechanics.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 122, 131

1/3 • CRN 18455 • Tue, Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 223 – Human Environmental Science / Te Āhurutanga o te Taiao

The methods of achieving building environmental conditions that relate to the requirements of building users. The course covers climatic analysis and specifications of the environmental performance of buildings, together with the thermal, visual, acoustic, and aerodynamic principles of building elements; plus the services systems required to control and maintain these conditions.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121; (X) BILD 223; SARC 281 in 2014-2017

2/3 • CRN 18395 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 224 – Fire Safety Design / Te Tinihanga a Mahuika

Basic principles of design to ensure the safety of people in buildings during a fire. The implications for building form, layout and interiors on escape route design, statutory requirements, and alternative solutions as means of compliance.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

Not offered in 2020

SARC 233 – Environment and Behaviour / Ngā Huatanga o te Taiao

Study of the interaction between human behaviour and the design of the physical environment related to age, gender, culture and occupation. Content scopes across physiological, psychological, social and cultural aspects and activity patterns.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

Not offered in 2020

SARC 252 – Building Heritage Conservation / Te Tiaki i ngā Whare Toitū

An introduction to building conservation with emphasis on New Zealand's architectural heritage. The course introduces systems of assessment, interpretation, management, and documentation of culturally significant buildings. Attention is given to issues raised by contemporary modification of buildings and implications on historic integrity and/or authenticity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

Not offered in 2020

SARC 261 – Communication / Ngā Kaupapa Hangarau

Studio-based course introduces and develops the representation of design concepts of projects, with a focus on drawing and modelling by means of analogue and digital media. Emphasis is placed on developing effective graphic communication techniques for design and implementation.

15 pts • (P) SARC 161 and 162

2/3 • CRN 18348 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 311 – Architecture Design II / Te Whakarākei Whare II

Studio-based contemporary design issues related to the professional specialisations and research interests of academic staff. Introduction to design as a research-led activity and as a research methodology.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212

1/3 • CRN 18528 • Tue, Fri 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 312 – Architecture Design Integration Capstone / Te Whakakotahitanga o ngā Tikanga-Tūtohu o te Whakarākei Whare

Studio-based design projects explore the relationship between architectural concepts, structural systems, materials and construction techniques, integrating knowledge gained in the construction course. Design is presented as an integrated problem-solving process, which results in a creative synthesis of concept, aesthetics, function and technology.

30 pts • (P) ARCI 311, SARC 222 (C) SARC 321

2/3 • CRN 18529 • Mon, Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 311 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Mahi Whakaaturanga

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) ARCI/INTA/LAND 212 or BILD 232 or INDN 212

1/3 • CRN 18294 • Mon 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 312 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Tikanga me ngā Tukanga Waihanga Taputapu Whare

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry.

15 pts • (P) SARC 212

1/3 • CRN 18295 • Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 320 – Topic in Digital Computation / Tātai Hangarau

.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2020

SARC 321 – Construction / Te Mahi Waihanga

Medium-scale building construction with relevant building materials, key elements, construction technologies, construction sequences and building processes.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

2/3 • CRN 18296 • Mon, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Mon, Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 323 – Colour, Pattern, Light / Ngā Āhuatanga o te Ata me te Pō

Study of colour, pattern and lighting concepts and technologies and their meaning, role and creative applications.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18297 • Wed 2.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 328 – Topic in Current Research in Architecture / Ngā Rangahau o te Wā i te Mahi Whakarākei / Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons, including film, digital and heritage representations of prisons. International examples will be drawn on, but there will be particular attention paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

1/3 • CRN 32133 • Wed 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 351 – Urban Design Theory and Practice / Te Mahi me ngā Kōrero o te Ao Kikokiko

Introduction to the history, theory and practice of urban design. Conceptual tools and practices for analyzing, designing and implementing change in the built environment of cities.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

1/3 • CRN 18299 • Tue, Fri 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 352 – Pacific Designed Environments / Ngā Taiao o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa

Introduction to issues relating to designed and built environments of the Pacific region. Examination of contemporary conditions within a wider spatial and historical framework. In addition to a central focus on the settlement of Aotearoa/New Zealand, course material extends to other cultures within the greater Pacific rim.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

2/3 • CRN 18300 • Tue 3-5pm [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 353 – History of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero o Mua o Te Mahi Whakarākei

Examines paradigm shifts in architectural thinking. Course material emphasises enduring examples of great architecture which reflect the prevailing social and cultural standards of their respective periods.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

Not offered in 2020

SARC 354 – Heritage Conservation / Ngā Mahi Tiaki i ngā Whare Whakaniko

This course introduces the why, what and how of heritage conservation. Historic and contemporary approaches to heritage conservation are discussed with recent case studies (including building visits) used as vehicles for the discussion. The purpose and role of a Conservation Plan is explored. Research methods for eliciting historical information specific to a building or interior are introduced and practised. Methods of assessing heritage significance and value and of making recommendations for conservation activity are explored.

15 pts • (P) 30 pts 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC; (X) SARC 454

1/3 • CRN 18302 • Mon 3.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 362 – Introduction to Practice and Management / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi me Te Whakahaere

Management and procurement/development, examining the theories and ideas that underpin planning, organising, directing and controlling the use of resources over time. Topics include the principles of management, organisational development, basic finance, costing, development feasibility, valuation theory and quantitative analysis relevant to the construction industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

1/3 • CRN 18304 • Mon, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 363 – Digital Representation and Documentation / Te Mahi a te Ao Hangarau

Computer applications as aids to visualisation and information management.

15 pts • (P) One of LAND/SARC 221; (X) SARC 463

Not offered in 2020

SARC 365 – Drawing / He Tuhituhi

Studio-based course covering creative and interpretive aspects of drawing with an emphasis on developing analytical and critical interrogation through manual graphic processes and across a range of subjects, media types and applied subjects. Discussed as principles and expanded upon in application, are the conventions and standards of architectural representation common to drawing practice.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 211

1/3 • CRN 18287 • ^ Thu 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 371 – International Field Study / Te Mahi a te Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed spaces and sites with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the historical and cultural contexts they are part of and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC pts; (X) SARC 471

3/3 • CRN 23053 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 386 – Special Topic: Retail Experience Architectural Design

Investigate the future of retail design relevant to the 21st century, including research concepts underlying ethical branding, products and scripting of customer journeys. Develop a design proposal for the composition and atmosphere of retail space providing extraordinary customer experience for a brand and its products.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212 or BILD 251 or INTA 212 or LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18293 • Wed 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 387 – Independent Study / Kaupapa Rangahau Motuhake

This course is a supervised programme of research and study on selected themes. Independent Study Projects are available under exceptional circumstances and must be approved by the Head of School.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 23176 • tba [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 18333 • tba [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 32233 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 388 – Psychology and Behaviour in the Built Environment / Te Mātai Hinengaro me te Whanonga i ngā Whare Hangahanga

Application of psychological theory, principles and research to the study of human interaction with the built environment across a range of settings. This course focuses on how to improve usability, health, well-being and work performance in relationship to space and place. The course covers human and environment interaction theory, systems theory, psychology and design research methods, consequences of poorly informed design decisions and environmental stressors.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc schedules (X) SARC 384, 484 (2017-2019)

Not offered in 2020

Art History

ARTH 113 – Thinking through Art

This course introduces the field of art history through the study of key works of art. Each lecture considers how the meaning of a particular artwork changes over time. Students will be introduced to stylistic, iconographic and contextual analysis, and gain insight into central debates in the discipline.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 9919 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ARTH 114 – Art and Encounter

This course approaches art history from a global perspective to look at key episodes of cross-cultural encounter from the Renaissance to the present. Each lecture focuses on specific art works to explore the process of interaction and exchange between cultures and its role in the construction of cultural identity.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 27020 • Tue, Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 212 – History of Photography

This course aims to survey the history of photography as it develops within a number of specific thematics, from the advent of the medium in the late eighteenth century through to the present. Accordingly, it will look at photography as a cultural phenomenon as much as an art form.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts; (X) ARTH 319 before 2015

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 213 – Art in Aotearoa New Zealand

A chronological survey of the art of Aotearoa New Zealand from the 1760s to the present.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts

1/3 • CRN 7025 • Tue, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ARTH 214 – Art in the Pacific

ARTH 214 is a survey of art in Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia from pre-historical times to the mid-twentieth century. It will explore a range of critical topics including: Pacific perspectives on the nature and purpose of 'art', the role of art within different social and political formations, and indigenous artistic responses to colonialism and modernity. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts or one of (PASI 101, ANTH 101, ANTH 102, HIST 111, HIST 112)

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 216 – Byzantine and Medieval Art

A survey of early Christian, Byzantine and western medieval art from AD 300 to 1350.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts; (X) ARTH 333

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 217 – The Renaissance

A survey of Renaissance art, 1400-1600. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts; (X) ARTH 220, ARTH 330

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 218 – The Baroque

A survey of European art, 1600-1750.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts; (X) ARTH 221

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 219 – Modernism and Modernity

This course covers the major tendencies in modern European art from 1890 to 1950. It considers the emergence of major art movements like fauvism, cubism, futurism, and surrealism as a response to the changes in European society and the development of new visual vocabularies to describe modern experience.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts

1/3 • CRN 7029 • Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ARTH 222 – Neoclassicism to Impressionism

ARTH 222 surveys European art from the later 18th-century to around 1900, introducing the principal movements, the leading artists and the theoretical concerns of the period. Beginning with Neoclassicism and Romanticism, two international artistic currents that ran parallel as well as counter to each other, the course then examines Realism and Impressionism, movements which emphasised direct reportage and the rendering of nature in new ways. Particular attention will be paid to French and British art, both academic and avant-garde.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts; (X) ARTH 316 (2019)

2/3 • CRN 3475 • Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ARTH 310 – Topics in Colonial Art

Beginning with the earliest European artists visiting the Pacific, ARTH 310 investigates issues in the colonial art of Australia and New Zealand within a wider context of colonial traditions, particularly the art of the American 'frontier'. We explore the complex interrelationships between settlers and indigenous peoples, and between colonies and homeland, that inform these vibrant traditions. The course encourages close study of actual artefacts and monuments and includes a field trip to the Alexander Turnbull Library.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level ARTH pts

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 311 – Topics in Contemporary New Zealand Art

This course investigates issues that have shaped contemporary art practice in New Zealand from 1960 to the present.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level ARTH pts; (X) ARTH 411

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 313 – Topics in Renaissance Art

This course investigates key issues in Renaissance art, including changing workshop practice, the significance of the patron, primary sources, contact with other cultures, art and antiquity and art and science. 70% internal assessment, 30% examination.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level ARTH pts

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 315 – Topics in 18th-Century Art: Vision, Enlightenment and Encounter

European voyages to the Pacific in the 18th-century dramatically expanded people's awareness of the wider world: Europeans of the Pacific, and Pacific Islanders of Europe. ARTH 315 examines the meanings and contexts of art in 18th-century European and Pacific societies, and art's role in mediating encounters across cultures.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level ARTH pts

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 317 – Topics in 20th-Century Art

This course investigates 20th-century art through a range of debated issues such as: the relationship between art and power, notions of 'primitivism' and the 'other', and representations of the body.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level ARTH pts

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 319 – Topics in the History of Photography

This course examines particular topics drawn from throughout the history of photography, from the medium's conception in the late 18th century through to contemporary art practices. The course will focus on photography since the 1960s.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level ARTH pts; (X) ARTH 335 in 2010

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 335 – Special Topic: Art and the Cold War, 1945-1975

This course focuses on the visual arts from the post-WWII period to the end of the Vietnam War. It looks at the fate of modernism and avant-garde art in an era characterised by the ideological conflict between the capitalist West and communist East, decolonialisation and the emergence of the Third World, and increasing mobility and technological change.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level ARTH pts

2/3 • CRN 3483 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 336 – Topics in Pacific Art

Examines the art and visual culture of the Pacific from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Topics include decolonisation and cultural revival, art and nationhood, Indigenous modernisms and contemporary Pacific art in the global art world.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level ARTH pts

1/3 • CRN 27022 • Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

Asian Studies

ASIA 101 – Introduction to Asian Studies

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of aspects of Asia, via a focus on the relationship between Asia and New Zealand. Topics include historical contacts, economic and political relations, cultural globalisation, and immigrant communities.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 8006 • Tue, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ASIA 111 – Introduction to Asian Histories and Cultures

An introduction to the histories and cultures of selected regions of Asia, with a focus on religion, social change, patterns of thought and ways of life.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 30037 • Wed 1-3pm [Kelburn]

FHSS 110 – Exploring the World through Languages and Cultures

How do languages and cultures interrelate, and how can we read them in the world around us? This course provides students with insights into how languages and cultures shape and reflect identity by critically engaging with a wide variety of global texts and objects located in New Zealand’s capital city and beyond. Texts are studied in English translation.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

ASIA 201 – Contemporary Asian Society

An in-depth look at contemporary Asian societies with particular attention to economic, political and social change within the region and how these changes have been manifested in cultural productions.

20 pts • (P) (ASIA 101 or 111) or 40 pts from the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 6627 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ASIA 203 – Modern Korean Society

This course offers a study of contemporary Korean society and popular culture and draws on primary sources from literature, film and music. Co-taught with ASIA 304. Trimester 3: Withdrawal with refund by 12/01/2018; withdrawal without refund by 07/02/2018, after which date the permission of the Associate Dean (Students) will be required to withdraw.

20 pts • (P) (ASIA 101 or 1 or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ASIA 304

Not offered in 2020

ASIA 208 – East Asian Society and Culture through Film

This course examines East Asian cinema from the early twentieth century to the present. Selected East Asian films are studied in their historical, political and cultural context with special emphasis on issues related to nationhood, modernity, gender roles and globalisation. This course is to be taught in English and has a film viewing component.

20 pts • (P) 40 points, including at least 20 points from (ASIA, CHIN, JAPA, FILM)

Not offered in 2020

FHSS 210 – Language Study Abroad

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 100-level points at Victoria. The course is available both to students who have studied the language before and to students with no previous knowledge of the language. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 100-level and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 28218 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ASIA 301 – Nation and Nationalism in Asia

What is a nation? What is nationalism? This course provides an interdisciplinary context within which students explore these important questions as they relate to Asian Studies.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from Part A of the the BA Schedule, including at least 20 points from (ASIA, HIST, INTP)

1/3 • CRN 6628 • Mon 3-5pm [Kelburn]

ASIA 302 – Selected Topic: Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of research and study on selected themes in Asian Studies.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from the BA Schedule, a B average or better at 200-level and permission of the Programme Director

1/3 • CRN 8318 • ^ [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 11053 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ASIA 304 – Modern Korean Society

This course offers a study of contemporary Korean society and popular culture and draws on primary sources from literature, film and music. Co-taught with ASIA 203. Trimester 3: Withdrawal with refund by 12/01/2018; withdrawal without refund by 07/02/2018, after which date the permission of the Associate Dean (Students) will be required to withdraw.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ASIA 203

Not offered in 2020

FHSS 310 – Study Abroad for Language Students

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 points of relevant language acquisition courses at Victoria. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points of language study at 200-level or higher and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 25151 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Biological Sciences

See also Cell and Molecular Bioscience, Conservation Biology, Ecological Restoration, Ecology and Biodiversity, Marine Biology and Microbiology

BIOL 111 – Cell Biology

Structure and function of pro- and eukaryotic cells, an introduction to biological chemistry, cell ultrastructure and metabolism, cell division and development. An extensive introduction to cell biology. Cellular structure and function are examined, using examples from bacteria, plants and animals. A knowledge of introductory chemistry is an advantage but not essential.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 566 • Mon, Tue, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 113 – Biology of Plants

An exploration into the structure, function and biodiversity of plants and fungi, emphasising their adaptations to different environments, their interactions with other organisms and their fundamental importance to humanity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 7037 • Mon 3-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 114 – Biology of Animals

An introduction to animal structure and function. This course is largely based on the biology of mammals with a strong emphasis on human biology but comparison is made throughout with other animals.

15 pts • (X) BMSC 114

1/3 • CRN 7038 • Tue, Thu, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 132 – Biodiversity and Conservation

An introduction to the diversity, management and conservation of microbial, plant and animal communities. Using key taxa or ecosystems as examples, students will gain an appreciation of the current issues facing the world's biodiversity, and explore possible methods for conservation, including habitat restoration, translocation, and predator control.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 568 • [Distance (NZ)]

BIOL 219 – New Zealand Flora and Fauna

Understanding the unique biological history of Aotearoa, New Zealand. This course is offered in two formats. The first (CRN 8036) is second trimester and consists of lectures, laboratories and field trips while the second offering (CRN 8828) is an intensive 10-day version consisting of lectures, laboratories and field trips and is offered in the first part of the third trimester.

15 pts • (P) 60 points

2/3 • CRN 8036 • [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 8828 • [Kelburn]

BIOL 222 – Ecology and Environment

An introduction to the principles of Ecology and Environmental Science, including a required week long field trip in the mid-trimester break. The course will focus on physical and biological processes in terrestrial environments and ecosystem functioning. The field trip will introduce techniques relevant to field-based enquiry in ecological and environmental science. Also taught as GEOG 222.

20 pts • (P) STAT 193; 30 points from (BIOL 111, 113, 114, 132, ENVI/GEOG 114, ESCI/GEOG 111, ESCI 112); (X) ENVI/GEOG 222

1/3 • CRN 15180 • Mon, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn], Tue, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

BIOL 227 – Plants and Algae: Function and Diversity

Plant and algal physiology and structure with emphasis on adaptations of the whole organism; diversity and evolution of photosynthetic organisms (including blue-green bacteria, algae, and plants) and fungi.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 113

2/3 • CRN 9214 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BIOL 228 – Animal Diversity

Diversity, form, and function of animals; an overview of the taxonomic diversity of all animals; focused study of selected terrestrial and aquatic taxa, including sponges, cnidarians, annelids, molluscs, arthropods and vertebrates.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 114

1/3 • CRN 9215 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

BIOL 234 – Special Topic: Microbes and their Environments

Microbes may be small, but they are mighty. They make up ~15% of the biomass on Earth and are critical drivers of ecological processes. This course will introduce the physiological and biochemical diversity of microbes. It will also explore the important roles that microbes play in different environments (soil, water, and within hosts).

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111

2/3 • CRN 13572 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 236 – Environmental Microbiology

This course combines a review of microbial diversity with field visits to a number of different environments. The environments covered will include sea and fresh water habitats, soil, vegetation, and extreme environments such as geothermal areas and Polar sea ice. The role of microbes in the ecological, biogeochemical and bioremedial processes in different environments will be discussed. The experimental component of the course consists of site visits for the sampling of microbes from the environment and a laboratory component for the characterisation of microbes isolated. Molecular biology and bioinformatic tools will be used for identification of environmental microbes.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, 45 pts from ((BIOL, BMSC, BTEC) at 100-399, ESCI 112)

Not offered in 2020

BIOL 241 – Genetics

An introduction to the structure and behaviour of chromosomes, genes and DNA; and to the processes of heredity and the mechanisms by which genetic information is transmitted and expressed in animals (including humans), plants and micro-organisms. Introduction to population genetics and DNA technologies.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111 (X) BMSC 241

2/3 • CRN 9055 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 243 – Physiology and Pharmacology

Included in this course will be the study of the functioning and roles of the central and peripheral nervous and hormonal systems in control of cardiovascular and respiratory activity, digestion and absorption; metabolic responses to different environmental and energy demands; sensory systems; muscular physiology, etc. The emphasis is on mammalian physiology with particular reference to human functions. The elements of pharmacology are introduced in the context of modulation of normal function.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, 114; CHEM 113 or 114 (X) BMSC 243

2/3 • CRN 9057 • Mon, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 244 – Introductory Biochemistry

An introduction to the relationship between structure and function of proteins, including catalysis and its regulation; the mechanisms and roles of metabolic processes in the interconversion of molecules in animals, plants and micro-organisms.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111; CHEM 113 or 114 (X) BIOL/BMSC 239, 240, BMSC 244

1/3 • CRN 18337 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 252 – Cell and Developmental Biology

This course expands on topics introduced in first year cell biology, covering the structure and behaviour of cells in terms of underlying molecular events, and the role of cells in the physiology and development of the whole organism.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, 114 (X) BMSC 252

1/3 • CRN 9056 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 271 – Introductory Marine Ecology

An introductory course focusing on marine biology and ecology. This course introduces students to: the diversity and physiology of marine organisms; biological oceanography; the structure and function of marine ecosystems such as the deep sea, polar seas, rocky shores, mangrove forests and coral reefs and marine conservation issues.

20 pts • (P) 60 pts including BIOL 114

2/3 • CRN 9216 • Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

BIOL 314 – Island Ecology & Evolution - International Field Course in Biological Sciences

This course will put New Zealand's biota in a broader evolutionary context by investigating how our flora and fauna has evolved after reaching Lord Howe Island (LHI). A week long field trip to LHI will teach advanced principles of evolution, island ecology and conservation covered in preliminary lectures. This field trip typically takes place in the mid-year break. Note additional field costs of around $3,000 for the course.

15 pts • (P) BIOL/GEOG 222 and 15 200-level BIOL, ENVI or STAT pts or permission of Head of School (X) BIOL 414

block dates/3 • CRN 27126 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

BIOL 325 – Global Change Biology: The Ecology of Our Planet Under Stress

An introduction to the ecophysiological responses of plants and animals to environmental and anthropogenic stress, with an emphasis on the effects of changes in global climate and land use. The course focuses on biological functions as they are affected by interactions with their physical, chemical and biotic environments.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level BIOL pts

1/3 • CRN 19701 • Tue, Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 327 – Population and Community Ecology

This course will cover practical and conceptual approaches to the study of plant and animal ecology covering population dynamics, community structure and ecosystem ecology.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/GEOG 222, 15 200-level BIOL, ENVI or STAT pts

1/3 • CRN 9218 • Tue, Wed 1-3pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 328 – Behaviour and Conservation Ecology

This course will cover the behaviour and conservation ecology of animals and plants. The course will include ethology and sociobiology, and ecological, genetic and biogeographic principles relevant to biological conservation. Topics will incorporate pest control, environmental impact assessment, and conservation priority ranking. Case studies and issues of topical interest will be debated.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/ENVI 222, 15 200-level BIOL, ENVI or STAT pts

2/3 • CRN 9219 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

BIOL 329 – Evolution

Origin and development of concepts about biological history including the establishment of modern experimental methods for understanding pattern and process in the origin of new species.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241

2/3 • CRN 9220 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 340 – Genes and Genomes

Recombinant DNA technology, biotechnology, gene organisation, expression, chemical genetics and evolution in higher organisms, bioinformatics and comparative genomics.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241, 244 (X) BMSC 340

1/3 • CRN 9598 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

BIOL 370 – Field Marine Ecology

An intensive research-based course of laboratories, field trips, sampling, analysis and independent projects. This 7-day field course runs from 8 to 14 February 2020 and includes 2 nights/3 days at a remote field site. The first meeting is at VUCEL (Victoria University Coastal Ecology Lab, 396 The Esplanade, Island Bay), 8:30am SHARP. Purchase and read the COURSE MANUAL from the Student Notes Shop prior to the start of class for more details.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 271, STAT 292 (X) BIOL 272

block dates/3 • CRN 19801 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

BIOL 371 – Marine Ecology

Focusing on marine system quantitative ecology; teaching encourages students to think critically while investigating ecological processes and impacts upon population dynamics and community structure across various marine settings (e.g. soft shores, rocky and coral reefs). The course emphasises quantitative methods including design, statistical analysis and interpretation of field experiments and observational studies.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 271, STAT 292

1/3 • CRN 9221 • Wed 10-12 [Kelburn], Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 372 – Applied Marine Biology

The biology, form, and function of selected New Zealand marine invertebrate groups with special emphasis given to species of economic or cultural significance; the biological, ecological, legal, and economic background to fisheries, fisheries management and aquaculture worldwide and in New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 228, 271

2/3 • CRN 9222 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

Biomedical Science

BMSC 116 – Sex and Evolution

This course examines broad evolutionary themes in relation to mating patterns,gamete and early development. Examples will be taken from fungi, plants and a range of animals, both vertebrate and invertebrate. Human pregnancy and birth will also be examined. Tutorial workshops are an opportunity to discuss and explore selected topics in more depth. The course introduces basic aspects of human anatomy, physiology, genetics and psychology, and is thus a stepping-stone to advanced courses in these subjects.

15 pts • (X) BIOL 116

1/3 • CRN 8738 • Tue, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 117 – The Biology of Disease

The nature and origin of disease. Bacteria and viruses: structure, identification and classification. Mechanisms of infection, pathogenesis, virulence, host susceptibility, immunity, epidemiology.Control strategies, new technologies. New organisms. Invertebrate and fungal parasites. Ecological and cultural aspects of disease.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 8739 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

HLWB 103 – Introduction to Human Biology for Health

This course introduces key concepts in human biology, including anatomy and physiology in healthy people. The course will also explore the biological responses to stress, injury and disease as it affects human homeostasis.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30051 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 301 – Medical Microbiology

This course charts the development of the microbiology field up to the present day. The course features an in-depth investigation of microorganisms at the genetic and phenotypic levels and examines their role in infectious diseases. Students will acquire practical experience in the characterisation and identification of microbes using both classical and modern techniques. This course includes six 4-hour laboratory classes. Students are advised to check the laboratory class times before course enrolment.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 244 or BTEC 201

1/3 • CRN 8747 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

BMSC 323 – Systems Pathology

A description of the pathogenesis, morphology, and complications of common benign and malignant diseases.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 335 (X) BMSC 202

2/3 • CRN 8754 • Tue, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 334 – Cell and Immunobiology

The cellular and molecular basis of the immune system, its organisation, reactions and controls in health and disease. Topics covered include the activation, differentiation and control of specific cell functions and immunological methods in research.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241, 252 (X) BIOL 334

2/3 • CRN 15262 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed, Thu, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BMSC 335 – Advanced Physiology

Cellular, organismal and integrative physiology of the mammalian neural, renal, muscular, cardiovascular, and reproductive systems. Advanced topics include neuroendocrine, developmental physiology, renal excretion and the circulation. Subtopics include functional brain anatomy, motor control, cognition, and speech, renal nephron function, muscle physiology, control of coronary blood flow, exercise physiology, homeostasis in regards to energy, temperature, glucose and calcium and embryological and placental physiology.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 243; (X) BIOL 335

1/3 • CRN 15263 • Mon, Tue, Wed 8-9 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BMSC 339 – Cellular Regulation

The overall theme is a consideration of molecular processes that affect normal cell structure and function. Abnormalities, including cancer, are also described. Also taught as BIOL 339.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 244, 252; (X) BIOL 339

2/3 • CRN 15265 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 343 – Advanced Genetics

A survey of experimental approaches in genetics, from classical screens to genome-wide analyses, examining a variety of genetic model organisms and their specific applications, cytogenetics, chromosomal abnormalities and associated genetic counselling issues in humans. Fundamentals are applied to searches for complex disease genes, and understanding genetic variation in human populations.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241; (X) BIOL 343, BIOL/BMSC 341, 342

1/3 • CRN 19861 • Mon, Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 354 – Pharmacology

Drug targets, interactions and transport. Biotransformations and drug metabolism. Measurement techniques. Models for quantification of drug distribution, absorption and elimination. Formulation. Case studies.

20 pts • (P) 35 points from (BIOL/BMSC 243, 244, CHEM 115, 201)

2/3 • CRN 8756 • Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

Biotechnology

See also Biological Sciences

BTEC 101 – Introduction to Biotechnology

The aims of this course are to provide a solid understanding of the pure and applied science underlying the biotechnology industry, and to provide insight into the cultural and ethical values, and economic and political issues, that this science must align with. Particular focus in lectures will be given to the techniques and applications of recombinant biotechnology in microbes, plants & animals; harnessing natural resources; health-related biotechnology; reproductive biotechnology; environmental biotechnology; and regulation of biotechnology.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 11092 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BTEC 201 – Molecular Biotechnology

The aims of this course are to introduce the biotechnology industry, through examples of biotechnological innovation, introduction to microbial, plant and animal biotechnology, harnessing natural resources, health-related biotechnology and placing these in the context of cultural and ethical values and political issues. A key focus will be the understanding of important biotechnological processes and events at a molecular level.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, BTEC 101

2/3 • CRN 11093 • Mon, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BTEC 301 – Biotechnological Techniques and Processes

The aims of this course are to provide a solid understanding of the pure and applied science underlying the biotechnology industry, and to provide insight into the cultural and ethical values, and economic and political issues, that this science must align with. Particular focus in lectures will be given to the techniques and processes involved in development of therapeutics, vaccines, and diagnostics, and to stem cell and genetic technologies. A six-week laboratory component will provide hands-on experience with key techniques and concepts introduced in both BTEC 201 and BTEC 301.

20 pts • (P) BTEC 201

1/3 • CRN 11094 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

Biotechnology & Biodiscovery (Study Abroad)

BIOL 111 – Cell Biology

Structure and function of pro- and eukaryotic cells, an introduction to biological chemistry, cell ultrastructure and metabolism, cell division and development. An extensive introduction to cell biology. Cellular structure and function are examined, using examples from bacteria, plants and animals. A knowledge of introductory chemistry is an advantage but not essential.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 566 • Mon, Tue, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 113 – Biology of Plants

An exploration into the structure, function and biodiversity of plants and fungi, emphasising their adaptations to different environments, their interactions with other organisms and their fundamental importance to humanity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 7037 • Mon 3-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 114 – Biology of Animals

An introduction to animal structure and function. This course is largely based on the biology of mammals with a strong emphasis on human biology but comparison is made throughout with other animals.

15 pts • (X) BMSC 114

1/3 • CRN 7038 • Tue, Thu, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 132 – Biodiversity and Conservation

An introduction to the diversity, management and conservation of microbial, plant and animal communities. Using key taxa or ecosystems as examples, students will gain an appreciation of the current issues facing the world's biodiversity, and explore possible methods for conservation, including habitat restoration, translocation, and predator control.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 568 • [Distance (NZ)]

BMSC 116 – Sex and Evolution

This course examines broad evolutionary themes in relation to mating patterns,gamete and early development. Examples will be taken from fungi, plants and a range of animals, both vertebrate and invertebrate. Human pregnancy and birth will also be examined. Tutorial workshops are an opportunity to discuss and explore selected topics in more depth. The course introduces basic aspects of human anatomy, physiology, genetics and psychology, and is thus a stepping-stone to advanced courses in these subjects.

15 pts • (X) BIOL 116

1/3 • CRN 8738 • Tue, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 117 – The Biology of Disease

The nature and origin of disease. Bacteria and viruses: structure, identification and classification. Mechanisms of infection, pathogenesis, virulence, host susceptibility, immunity, epidemiology.Control strategies, new technologies. New organisms. Invertebrate and fungal parasites. Ecological and cultural aspects of disease.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 8739 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

BTEC 101 – Introduction to Biotechnology

The aims of this course are to provide a solid understanding of the pure and applied science underlying the biotechnology industry, and to provide insight into the cultural and ethical values, and economic and political issues, that this science must align with. Particular focus in lectures will be given to the techniques and applications of recombinant biotechnology in microbes, plants & animals; harnessing natural resources; health-related biotechnology; reproductive biotechnology; environmental biotechnology; and regulation of biotechnology.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 11092 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

CHEM 113 – Concepts of Chemistry

Electronic structure and properties of atoms, periodic trends, bonding, chemical equilibria and thermodynamics, acids and bases, redox reactions, organic nomenclature, isomerism, identification and reactivity of the basic organic functional groups.

15 pts • (X) CHEM 103, 104, 114, 115

1/3 • CRN 17147 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHEM 114 – Principles of Chemistry

Principles of atomic and molecular structure, thermodynamics and kinetics together with an introduction to transition metals and their applications, and to a mechanistic interpretation of organic reactivity.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 113 or 18 AS credits at NCEA Level 3 Chemistry including: AS91390, AS91391 and AS91392 or equivalent background in Chemistry (X) CHEM 104

1/3 • CRN 17148 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 17170 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

PHIL 106 – Contemporary Ethical Issues

An introduction to issues in applied ethics. Topics may include: the morality of the death penalty, war, cloning, abortion and euthanasia, and the moral status of non-human animals.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 2044 • (L1) Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 27003 • (L2) Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

BIOL 219 – New Zealand Flora and Fauna

Understanding the unique biological history of Aotearoa, New Zealand. This course is offered in two formats. The first (CRN 8036) is second trimester and consists of lectures, laboratories and field trips while the second offering (CRN 8828) is an intensive 10-day version consisting of lectures, laboratories and field trips and is offered in the first part of the third trimester.

15 pts • (P) 60 points

2/3 • CRN 8036 • [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 8828 • [Kelburn]

BIOL 227 – Plants and Algae: Function and Diversity

Plant and algal physiology and structure with emphasis on adaptations of the whole organism; diversity and evolution of photosynthetic organisms (including blue-green bacteria, algae, and plants) and fungi.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 113

2/3 • CRN 9214 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BIOL 241 – Genetics

An introduction to the structure and behaviour of chromosomes, genes and DNA; and to the processes of heredity and the mechanisms by which genetic information is transmitted and expressed in animals (including humans), plants and micro-organisms. Introduction to population genetics and DNA technologies.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111 (X) BMSC 241

2/3 • CRN 9055 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 243 – Physiology and Pharmacology

Included in this course will be the study of the functioning and roles of the central and peripheral nervous and hormonal systems in control of cardiovascular and respiratory activity, digestion and absorption; metabolic responses to different environmental and energy demands; sensory systems; muscular physiology, etc. The emphasis is on mammalian physiology with particular reference to human functions. The elements of pharmacology are introduced in the context of modulation of normal function.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, 114; CHEM 113 or 114 (X) BMSC 243

2/3 • CRN 9057 • Mon, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 244 – Introductory Biochemistry

An introduction to the relationship between structure and function of proteins, including catalysis and its regulation; the mechanisms and roles of metabolic processes in the interconversion of molecules in animals, plants and micro-organisms.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111; CHEM 113 or 114 (X) BIOL/BMSC 239, 240, BMSC 244

1/3 • CRN 18337 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 252 – Cell and Developmental Biology

This course expands on topics introduced in first year cell biology, covering the structure and behaviour of cells in terms of underlying molecular events, and the role of cells in the physiology and development of the whole organism.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, 114 (X) BMSC 252

1/3 • CRN 9056 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BTEC 201 – Molecular Biotechnology

The aims of this course are to introduce the biotechnology industry, through examples of biotechnological innovation, introduction to microbial, plant and animal biotechnology, harnessing natural resources, health-related biotechnology and placing these in the context of cultural and ethical values and political issues. A key focus will be the understanding of important biotechnological processes and events at a molecular level.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, BTEC 101

2/3 • CRN 11093 • Mon, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

PHIL 202 – Ethics

This course is an examination of the 20th century approaches to ethics. Topics that may be discussed include: What is the nature of ethics and morality? Are our ethical judgments systematically mistaken? How and why have we evolved to make moral judgments?

20 pts • (P) 40 PHIL pts; (X) PHIL 302 prior to 2014

1/3 • CRN 3589 • Wed 9-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

BIOL 340 – Genes and Genomes

Recombinant DNA technology, biotechnology, gene organisation, expression, chemical genetics and evolution in higher organisms, bioinformatics and comparative genomics.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241, 244 (X) BMSC 340

1/3 • CRN 9598 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

BMSC 301 – Medical Microbiology

This course charts the development of the microbiology field up to the present day. The course features an in-depth investigation of microorganisms at the genetic and phenotypic levels and examines their role in infectious diseases. Students will acquire practical experience in the characterisation and identification of microbes using both classical and modern techniques. This course includes six 4-hour laboratory classes. Students are advised to check the laboratory class times before course enrolment.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 244 or BTEC 201

1/3 • CRN 8747 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

BMSC 323 – Systems Pathology

A description of the pathogenesis, morphology, and complications of common benign and malignant diseases.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 335 (X) BMSC 202

2/3 • CRN 8754 • Tue, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 334 – Cell and Immunobiology

The cellular and molecular basis of the immune system, its organisation, reactions and controls in health and disease. Topics covered include the activation, differentiation and control of specific cell functions and immunological methods in research.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241, 252 (X) BIOL 334

2/3 • CRN 15262 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed, Thu, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BMSC 339 – Cellular Regulation

The overall theme is a consideration of molecular processes that affect normal cell structure and function. Abnormalities, including cancer, are also described. Also taught as BIOL 339.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 244, 252; (X) BIOL 339

2/3 • CRN 15265 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 343 – Advanced Genetics

A survey of experimental approaches in genetics, from classical screens to genome-wide analyses, examining a variety of genetic model organisms and their specific applications, cytogenetics, chromosomal abnormalities and associated genetic counselling issues in humans. Fundamentals are applied to searches for complex disease genes, and understanding genetic variation in human populations.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241; (X) BIOL 343, BIOL/BMSC 341, 342

1/3 • CRN 19861 • Mon, Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 354 – Pharmacology

Drug targets, interactions and transport. Biotransformations and drug metabolism. Measurement techniques. Models for quantification of drug distribution, absorption and elimination. Formulation. Case studies.

20 pts • (P) 35 points from (BIOL/BMSC 243, 244, CHEM 115, 201)

2/3 • CRN 8756 • Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

BTEC 301 – Biotechnological Techniques and Processes

The aims of this course are to provide a solid understanding of the pure and applied science underlying the biotechnology industry, and to provide insight into the cultural and ethical values, and economic and political issues, that this science must align with. Particular focus in lectures will be given to the techniques and processes involved in development of therapeutics, vaccines, and diagnostics, and to stem cell and genetic technologies. A six-week laboratory component will provide hands-on experience with key techniques and concepts introduced in both BTEC 201 and BTEC 301.

20 pts • (P) BTEC 201

1/3 • CRN 11094 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

CHEM 301 – Organic Chemistry

Advanced topics in organic chemistry such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in structure elucidation, reaction intermediates, pericyclic reactions, organometallics in synthesis, retrosynthetic analysis, carbohydrate chemistry and biosynthesis.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 201

1/3 • CRN 9058 • Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

CHEM 305 – Chemistry Synthesis Laboratory

The synthesis and purification of compounds with identification and analysis employing spectroscopic methods. This programme provides for the development of advanced laboratory skills and the use of sophisticated laboratory techniques designed to illustrate research principles and methodology in synthetic chemistry. NOTE: Two 4-hour laboratory sessions per week should be selected in MyAllocator.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 201, 205

1/3 • CRN 9059 • [Kelburn]

Building Science

SARC 111 – Introduction to Design Processes / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Mahi Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce concepts and processes used in human environments. These concepts and processes are examined in relation to the physical, social and cultural contexts in which designers operate.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18165 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 112 – Design Processes / Ngā Tukanga

Studio-based projects explore how abstract concepts of formal and spatial composition can be used to create habitable places. Discipline-specific modules introduce concepts and processes which are particular to architecture, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts • (P) SARC 111

2/3 • CRN 18166 • tba [Kelburn]

SARC 121 – Introduction to Built Environment Technology / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Whare Hangahanga

The scientific and technological contexts within which the built environment is developed. An introduction to the forces of nature, structures, construction, environmental science and how users interact with buildings. Reference will be made to historical as well as contemporary technologies.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18167 • Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 122 – Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Tikanga Nama

Basic applied algebra, physics and statistics relevant to the study of design and the built environment.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18168 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 131 – Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Whakaora i Te Taiao Hangahanga

The definitions and macro contexts of sustainability, emphasising the roles, responsibilities and opportunities for professionals in the designed and built environment. The course covers climate and microclimate, resources, materials production, environmental impact and social equity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18169 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

SARC 151 – Introduction to Design History and Theory / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho i te ao Whakarākei

Introduction to the major historical and theoretical influences shaping the contemporary built environment.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18170 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 161 – Introduction to Design Communication / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi Ngātahi i Te Ao Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce principles, media and techniques used in the representation of three-dimensional design concepts. The studio component emphasises conventions for describing formal and spatial subjects in scaled drawings, physical models, digital models and text.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18171 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 162 – Design Communication / Te Whakarākei me te Mahi Ngātahi

Studio-based projects explore principles, media and techniques used in the representation of two and three-dimensional design concepts. Students are introduced to the communication conventions of architecture, building science, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18172 • tba [Kelburn]

BILD 223 – Human Environmental Science / Te Āhurutanga o te Taiao

Methods of achieving environmental conditions to meet the requirements of building users. The course covers climatic analysis and specifications of environmental performance, together with the thermal, visual, acoustic, and aerodynamic principles of building elements; plus the services systems required to control and maintain these conditions.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121 (X) SARC 223; SARC 281 (2014-2017);

2/3 • CRN 30213 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 231 – Environmental Engineering Systems / Ngā Tikanga Pūngao

This course examines types of environmental engineering systems used in buildings and urban settings, outlining the principles underlying their design and selection, together with their planning implications. Systems to be covered include: energy supply; heating, ventilating and air conditioning; electricity distribution; lighting; water supply and drainage; waste disposal and recycling.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

1/3 • CRN 18478 • Tue 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 232 – Sustainable Architecture / Ngā Whare Toitū

The philosophical, conceptual and contextual basis of sustainable and regenerative design. Content includes material on the ecological and environmental challenges to society in the present and future; resource stewardship and the effective utilisation of materials; working with nature and natural systems; well-being enhancement; green, sustainable and regenerative design.

15 pts • (P) SARC 131; (X) SARC 232

2/3 • CRN 18479 • Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 251 – History of Building Technology / Ngā Whanaketanga a te Ao Hangahanga

The historical, social and economic development of construction methods, materials and systems. The impact, relevance and importance of the scientific, industrial and information technology revolutions. Trends in the international development of building technology, with a primary focus on New Zealand.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121 or 151

2/3 • CRN 18480 • Mon, Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 261 – Building Project Management Economics / Te Whakahaere i te Ōhanga o ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare

Economic problems and the tools of economic analysis, demand, supply, competition, structure, profitability and production in the New Zealand building and construction industry. The impact of Government policy, investment evaluation and lifecycle costing of buildings.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 100-level SARC

1/3 • CRN 18481 • Wed 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 262 – Building Project Management Cost Planning / Te Whakahaere me te Whakamahere ā-utu i ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare

This course examines concepts of building cost planning and its theory and application in New Zealand. An overview of the principles of estimation, the standard method of measurement, schedules of quantities, elemental analysis, IT cost estimation and financial analysis.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

2/3 • CRN 18482 • Tue 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 211 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 112 or SARC 112

Not offered in 2020

SARC 212 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Te Waihanga me Ngā Momo Hangarau

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry and their creative application in the design of furniture and furnished environments.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 112 or SARC 112

2/3 • CRN 18457 • Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 221 – Building Materials and Construction / Te Waihanga me ngā Momo Rauemi

Buildings are studied as assemblages of distinct yet interrelated systems. Students explore basic materials and methods of construction, gaining insight to structural and other performance outcomes. Construction is discussed as a dimension in the overall design activity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 131

1/3 • CRN 18456 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

SARC 222 – Structural Systems / Te Whakamahinga o ngā Rauemi

Introduction to the basic structural principles and material properties that underpin the fabric of natural and constructed environments. The course presents the basic requirements for structural systems; structural form and proportion; equilibrium; strength of materials; bending and shear; combined stresses; elasticity, plasticity and ductility; elastic deformation; buckling; structural design principles; and, elementary soil mechanics.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 122, 131

1/3 • CRN 18455 • Tue, Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 223 – Human Environmental Science / Te Āhurutanga o te Taiao

The methods of achieving building environmental conditions that relate to the requirements of building users. The course covers climatic analysis and specifications of the environmental performance of buildings, together with the thermal, visual, acoustic, and aerodynamic principles of building elements; plus the services systems required to control and maintain these conditions.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121; (X) BILD 223; SARC 281 in 2014-2017

2/3 • CRN 18395 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 224 – Fire Safety Design / Te Tinihanga a Mahuika

Basic principles of design to ensure the safety of people in buildings during a fire. The implications for building form, layout and interiors on escape route design, statutory requirements, and alternative solutions as means of compliance.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

Not offered in 2020

SARC 233 – Environment and Behaviour / Ngā Huatanga o te Taiao

Study of the interaction between human behaviour and the design of the physical environment related to age, gender, culture and occupation. Content scopes across physiological, psychological, social and cultural aspects and activity patterns.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

Not offered in 2020

SARC 252 – Building Heritage Conservation / Te Tiaki i ngā Whare Toitū

An introduction to building conservation with emphasis on New Zealand's architectural heritage. The course introduces systems of assessment, interpretation, management, and documentation of culturally significant buildings. Attention is given to issues raised by contemporary modification of buildings and implications on historic integrity and/or authenticity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

Not offered in 2020

SARC 261 – Communication / Ngā Kaupapa Hangarau

Studio-based course introduces and develops the representation of design concepts of projects, with a focus on drawing and modelling by means of analogue and digital media. Emphasis is placed on developing effective graphic communication techniques for design and implementation.

15 pts • (P) SARC 161 and 162

2/3 • CRN 18348 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 321 – Sustainable Engineering Systems Design / Ngā Punaha Whakarauora i te Taiao

The interaction between buildings and the environment in the achievement of comfort, performance and sustainability and the design of appropriate sustainable engineering systems at the building scale.

15 pts • (P) BILD 231, 232

2/3 • CRN 18483 • Mon, Thu 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 322 – Structures / Ngā Āhuatanga Whare

Qualitative analysis of indeterminate structures; introduction to earthquake resistant design of buildings; structural loads and load paths; advanced reinforced concrete, timber and structural steel design and construction concepts.

15 pts • (P) SARC 222

2/3 • CRN 18484 • Wed 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 331 – Sustainable and Regenerative Design / Te Whakarauoratanga o ngā Mahi Whakarākei

Explores sustainable and regenerative design principles and applications across a range of designed and built environments. Students are taught to operate at the leading edge of theoretical and philosophical thinking in the field and to explore and employ critical thinking and innovative solutions.

15 pts • (P) BILD 232; (X) SARC 331

1/3 • CRN 18485 • Wed 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 361 – Project Management / Ngā Kaupapa Whakahaere

The theory, practice and current technologies of project management from implementation through to delivery, including project constraints, cost planning and control, critical path, consultation, administration and quality control.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC; (X) SARC 361

2/3 • CRN 18486 • Tue 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 362 – Construction Law / Ngā Ture Waihanga

The New Zealand legal system relating to land, buildings and the construction industry, including the law of torts, copyright, property, contracts, professional liability and arbitration.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

1/3 • CRN 18476 • Mon, Thu 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 364 – Building Code Compliance / Ngā Ture Whakaruruhau

Means of compliance with the New Zealand Building Code, building on technical knowledge gained in other courses. Means of compliance are: Acceptable Solutions, Verification Methods and Certification, and Performance Based Design.

15 pts • (P) One of LAND/SARC 221; (X) SARC 364, SARC 464

1/3 • CRN 18477 • Wed, Fri 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 311 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Mahi Whakaaturanga

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) ARCI/INTA/LAND 212 or BILD 232 or INDN 212

1/3 • CRN 18294 • Mon 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 312 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Tikanga me ngā Tukanga Waihanga Taputapu Whare

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry.

15 pts • (P) SARC 212

1/3 • CRN 18295 • Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 320 – Topic in Digital Computation / Tātai Hangarau

.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2020

SARC 321 – Construction / Te Mahi Waihanga

Medium-scale building construction with relevant building materials, key elements, construction technologies, construction sequences and building processes.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

2/3 • CRN 18296 • Mon, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Mon, Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 323 – Colour, Pattern, Light / Ngā Āhuatanga o te Ata me te Pō

Study of colour, pattern and lighting concepts and technologies and their meaning, role and creative applications.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18297 • Wed 2.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 328 – Topic in Current Research in Architecture / Ngā Rangahau o te Wā i te Mahi Whakarākei / Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons, including film, digital and heritage representations of prisons. International examples will be drawn on, but there will be particular attention paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

1/3 • CRN 32133 • Wed 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 351 – Urban Design Theory and Practice / Te Mahi me ngā Kōrero o te Ao Kikokiko

Introduction to the history, theory and practice of urban design. Conceptual tools and practices for analyzing, designing and implementing change in the built environment of cities.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

1/3 • CRN 18299 • Tue, Fri 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 352 – Pacific Designed Environments / Ngā Taiao o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa

Introduction to issues relating to designed and built environments of the Pacific region. Examination of contemporary conditions within a wider spatial and historical framework. In addition to a central focus on the settlement of Aotearoa/New Zealand, course material extends to other cultures within the greater Pacific rim.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

2/3 • CRN 18300 • Tue 3-5pm [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 353 – History of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero o Mua o Te Mahi Whakarākei

Examines paradigm shifts in architectural thinking. Course material emphasises enduring examples of great architecture which reflect the prevailing social and cultural standards of their respective periods.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

Not offered in 2020

SARC 354 – Heritage Conservation / Ngā Mahi Tiaki i ngā Whare Whakaniko

This course introduces the why, what and how of heritage conservation. Historic and contemporary approaches to heritage conservation are discussed with recent case studies (including building visits) used as vehicles for the discussion. The purpose and role of a Conservation Plan is explored. Research methods for eliciting historical information specific to a building or interior are introduced and practised. Methods of assessing heritage significance and value and of making recommendations for conservation activity are explored.

15 pts • (P) 30 pts 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC; (X) SARC 454

1/3 • CRN 18302 • Mon 3.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 362 – Introduction to Practice and Management / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi me Te Whakahaere

Management and procurement/development, examining the theories and ideas that underpin planning, organising, directing and controlling the use of resources over time. Topics include the principles of management, organisational development, basic finance, costing, development feasibility, valuation theory and quantitative analysis relevant to the construction industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

1/3 • CRN 18304 • Mon, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 363 – Digital Representation and Documentation / Te Mahi a te Ao Hangarau

Computer applications as aids to visualisation and information management.

15 pts • (P) One of LAND/SARC 221; (X) SARC 463

Not offered in 2020

SARC 365 – Drawing / He Tuhituhi

Studio-based course covering creative and interpretive aspects of drawing with an emphasis on developing analytical and critical interrogation through manual graphic processes and across a range of subjects, media types and applied subjects. Discussed as principles and expanded upon in application, are the conventions and standards of architectural representation common to drawing practice.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 211

1/3 • CRN 18287 • ^ Thu 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 371 – International Field Study / Te Mahi a te Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed spaces and sites with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the historical and cultural contexts they are part of and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC pts; (X) SARC 471

3/3 • CRN 23053 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 386 – Special Topic: Retail Experience Architectural Design

Investigate the future of retail design relevant to the 21st century, including research concepts underlying ethical branding, products and scripting of customer journeys. Develop a design proposal for the composition and atmosphere of retail space providing extraordinary customer experience for a brand and its products.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212 or BILD 251 or INTA 212 or LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18293 • Wed 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 387 – Independent Study / Kaupapa Rangahau Motuhake

This course is a supervised programme of research and study on selected themes. Independent Study Projects are available under exceptional circumstances and must be approved by the Head of School.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 23176 • tba [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 18333 • tba [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 32233 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 388 – Psychology and Behaviour in the Built Environment / Te Mātai Hinengaro me te Whanonga i ngā Whare Hangahanga

Application of psychological theory, principles and research to the study of human interaction with the built environment across a range of settings. This course focuses on how to improve usability, health, well-being and work performance in relationship to space and place. The course covers human and environment interaction theory, systems theory, psychology and design research methods, consequences of poorly informed design decisions and environmental stressors.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc schedules (X) SARC 384, 484 (2017-2019)

Not offered in 2020

Business (Study Abroad)

ECON 130 – Microeconomic Principles

An introduction to economic principles and their application to issues facing households, businesses and government in the New Zealand economy and the international economic environment. Note: CRNs 17450 and 15517 are for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts • (X) ECON 113

1/3 • CRN 10034 • (L1) Wed, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 10035 • (L2) Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 10036 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 8827 • Mon, Wed, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ECON 141 – Macroeconomic Principles

An introduction to macroeconomics, including fiscal and monetary policies, the international sector, and analysis of income-expenditure, IS-MPR and aggregate demand-aggregate supply models.

15 pts • (X) ECON 140

1/3 • CRN 27005 • Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27008 • Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

INFO 101 – Introduction to Information Systems

An examination of the role of information systems in the business operations, managerial decision-making and strategy of modern organisations. The course introduces the fundamental concepts of computer-based information systems acquisition and use. INFO 101, CRN 15976 is for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 10038 • (L7) Mon, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 10060 • (L6) Mon, Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 8723 • (L2) Mon, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 8724 • (L3) Mon, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut, w/shop tba

MARK 101 – Principles of Marketing

An introduction to the study of marketing and its role in developing a strategic customer/client focus within commercial, public sector and not-for-profit organisations. Summer CRN 19872 is offered by distance mode and students are expected to be on campus for the final examination.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 8507 • (L2) Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 10047 • (L3) Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 16017 • (L5) Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 16018 • (L6) Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 19872 • [Distance (NZ)]

tut tba

MGMT 101 – Introduction to Management

This introductory course in management offers a broad perspective on modern management in the business, public and voluntary sectors, and examines key issues likely to face managers in the near future. Note:MGMT 101, CRN 13949 is for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 8508 • (L1) Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 16019 • (L4) Wed, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 10048 • (L2) Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 10049 • (L3) Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

QUAN 102 – Statistics for Business

An introduction to techniques useful in business research or practice. Topics include sampling, graphs and diagrams, measures of location and dispersion, correlation and simple regression, probability, estimation and hypothesis testing. Note: QUAN 102 CRNs 1482, 5010, 7212 have lectures and tutorials at Kelburn; CRNs 4501, 16016, 32186 are online with tutorials at Kelburn campus. CRNs 17433 and 17434 are for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts • (X) MATH 277, STAT 193

1/3 • CRN 1482 • (L1) Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 4501 • (L2) tba [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 5010 • (L3) Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 16016 • (L5) tba [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 7212 • (L4) Mon, Tue, Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 32186 • (L8) tba [Kelburn]

tut tba

ECON 201 – Intermediate Microeconomics

This course in intermediate microeconomic analysis includes demand theory and applications of consumer behaviour, analysis of market structures, strategic behaviour, introductory welfare economics and analysis of public goods and externalities.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130; QUAN 111 (or MATH 141/142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 1194 • Mon, Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 202 – Open-economy Macroeconomics

Applications of an open economy macroeconomic model to macroeconomic issues and policy, including the interdependence of macroeconomic activity and markets, the roles of expectations variables and other dynamic adjustment mechanisms, the significance of international events, exchange rate regimes, inflation, unemployment.

15 pts • (P) ECON 141 (or 140)

2/3 • CRN 1196 • Wed, Fri 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 212 – Macroeconomics: Growth, Stability and Crises

An introduction to dynamic macroeconomic processes and recurrent problems, including the recent global instability. Themes covered include the theory of economic growth, productivity, business cycle theory and the causes of banking crises, exchange rates and the international transmission of these processes.

15 pts • (P) ECON 141 (or 140)

Not offered in 2020

HRIR 207 – The Future of Work

Workforces are changing at a rapid pace with various predictions regarding the future nature of work. In this interdisciplinary course, students will critically examine the changing nature of the work and employment from a range of perspectives including Sociology, History, Philosophy, Media Studies, Design and Management. The course traces the history of work and employment, and considers the contemporary challenges facing workers and their employers in the context of labour market and wider social changes. Students will critically evaluate a range of views on these changes, and apply their understandings to a specific challenge presented by a Wellington organisation. This course is co-taught with FHSS207.

15 pts • (P) 60 points; (X) FHSS 205 in 2017, FHSS 207

1/3 • CRN 30143 • Mon 10.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

IBUS 201 – Principles of International Business

An introductory course in international business, providing comprehensive coverage of the issues facing firms in international markets. This course focuses on the international business environment and strategy.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130 or 30 pts from the BCom, BTM or BA schedules.

1/3 • CRN 8771 • Thu 10.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

3/3 • CRN 10994 • Tue, Thu 12.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

IBUS 212 – International Management

A comprehensive understanding of management issues faced by firms in international markets. Topics include culture, organisational behaviour and human resource management, in an international context.

15 pts • (P) MGMT 101 or 30 pts from the BCom, BTM or BA schedules.

1/3 • CRN 15282 • Mon 12.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 19791 • Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

MARK 201 – Digital Marketing Management

This course adopts an analytical and problem solving approach to the development and implementation of marketing activities and plans in today's digital world. Themes include sustainability, using information to drive decisions, branding, new product development and marketing metrics.

15 pts • (P) MARK 101

1/3 • CRN 18790 • Tue, Fri 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 18625 • Mon 3.30-5.30pm [Pipitea]

MARK 202 – Consumer Behaviour

The course examines consumers and their consumption-related behaviours, which includes the acquisition, usage and disposition of goods, services and experiences. It focuses on understanding consumers as individuals, as well as consumers within a sociocultural environment.

15 pts • (P) MARK101

1/3 • CRN 508 • Tue, Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 18789 • Tue, Fri 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

MARK 203 – Market Research

Examines the key role of collecting, interpreting and analysing information to assist marketing managers in formulating marketing strategy. Market research methods and information technologies are covered in detail.

15 pts • (P) MARK 101, QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 18787 • Thu 8.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 509 • Fri 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

WRIT 202 – Writing at Work

This course focuses on the knowledge needed to produce effective documents in business and government. Employers seek and reward effective writers, and WRIT 202 develops abilities in professional writing genres that include investigative reports, proposals, and workplace communication analyses. Withdrawal with refund by TBD, withdrawal without refund by TBD, after which date the permission of the Associate Dean (Students) will be required to withdraw.

20 pts • (P) 65 points

3/3 • CRN 15447 • Fri 9-12 [Kelburn]

ECON 309 – International Economics

Theories of international specialisation; trade and growth with consideration given to both the postive and normative effects of government policies relating to international trade. The course will also include an introduction to theories of current accounts and determinants of exchange rates in relations to international financial policies.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201, 202

1/3 • CRN 1206 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

IBUS 305 – Dynamic Strategy and Structure in International Business

This course explores the dynamic relationship between organisational capabilities, strategy formulation and the corresponding structure employed within international business, examining strategies for growth through internationalisation, exporting, co-operative inter-firm agreements and evolution of traditional hierarchical structures.

15 pts • (P) IBUS 201 or 212 or MGMT 205

1/3 • CRN 9243 • Tue 11.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 19792 • Thu 11.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

IBUS 312 – Managing and Communicating Across Cultures

This course explores how cultural values influence workplace behaviours of individuals in different nations. The theories are applied to: managing people; increasing effectiveness of diverse teams; negotiating; selecting and training expatriates and dealing with culture shock.

15 pts • (P) IBUS 201 (or 212)

2/3 • CRN 19793 • Mon 9.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

Chemistry

See also Biomedical Science

CHEM 113 – Concepts of Chemistry

Electronic structure and properties of atoms, periodic trends, bonding, chemical equilibria and thermodynamics, acids and bases, redox reactions, organic nomenclature, isomerism, identification and reactivity of the basic organic functional groups.

15 pts • (X) CHEM 103, 104, 114, 115

1/3 • CRN 17147 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHEM 114 – Principles of Chemistry

Principles of atomic and molecular structure, thermodynamics and kinetics together with an introduction to transition metals and their applications, and to a mechanistic interpretation of organic reactivity.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 113 or 18 AS credits at NCEA Level 3 Chemistry including: AS91390, AS91391 and AS91392 or equivalent background in Chemistry (X) CHEM 104

1/3 • CRN 17148 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 17170 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHEM 115 – Structure and Spectroscopy

This course will be a skills-based approach to structural elucidation in chemistry and will introduce the principles of solid state chemistry, crystal structures, Bragg's Law, crystallography; the basic concepts of the common forms of chemical spectroscopy; IR, NMR, adsorption and emission spectroscopy.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 114 or (A- or better in CHEM 113 and concurrent enrolment in CHEM 114) (X) CHEM 204

2/3 • CRN 17149 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHEM 191 – Introductory Chemistry

This online summer bridging course may be used either to provide the basic chemical concepts and laboratory skills desirable for the study of chemistry at university level or as a refresher course for those who have studied chemistry in the past. It is highly recommended for BBmedSc students who do not have an adequate background in chemistry. While CHEM 191 is designed for students with little or no previous experience of chemistry, it may be taken for credit by any student who has not already passed a higher level chemistry course. It is offered in two streams: November to February and January to February.

15 pts • (X) CHEM 113, 114

3/3 • CRN 7193 • (L1) tba [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 23006 • (L2) tba [Kelburn]

CHEM 201 – Organic Chemistry

The organic chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic families of compounds and the influence of electronic factors on reactivity. The influence of molecular shape and chirality on reactivity is examined.

15 pts • (P) (CHEM 114, 115) or equivalent background

2/3 • CRN 8607 • Mon, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHEM 202 – Inorganic and Materials Chemistry

The principles and application of the chemistry of the elements, including molecular and solid state chemistry, structure determination and applied chemistry; computational chemistry; the chemistry of materials including those associated with advanced technologies.

15 pts • (P) (CHEM 114, 115) or equivalent background

1/3 • CRN 8608 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

CHEM 203 – Physical and Process Chemistry

Describing and understanding chemical systems and reactivity is explored through thermodynamics, kinetics and computational chemistry. Optical spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure and behaviour. The introduction of surfaces or enhanced interactions between molecules modifies chemical reactivity as explored in surface chemistry and electrolyte behaviour. Real-world examples illustrate chemical applications.

15 pts • (P) (CHEM 114, 115) or equivalent background

2/3 • CRN 7598 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

CHEM 205 – Chemical Synthesis - Laboratory Component

An opportunity to develop practical skills, competence and confidence in the chemistry laboratory with particular reference to the synthesis and purification of molecules and compounds, functional group transformations; physical, chemical and spectroscopic characterisation, and multi-step syntheses. The programme provides an introduction to the nature of research involving organic and inorganic bench chemistry. NOTE: Only 1 x 4-hour laboratory session per week to be selected from the list of 5 options and 1 x 2-hour laboratory session is also required.

15 pts • (P) (CHEM 114, 115) or equivalent background

2/3 • CRN 8610 • [Kelburn]

CHEM 206 – Chemical Methods and Processes - Laboratory Component

An opportunity to develop practical skills, competence and confidence in the chemistry laboratory with particular reference to experimental methods and procedures in chemistry and materials science including the measurement and characterisation of chemical phenomena, properties and systems; and chemical processes and their emulation.

15 pts • (P) (CHEM 114, 115) or equivalent background

1/3 • CRN 8611 • [Kelburn]

CHEM 225 – Analytical Chemistry

The major methods of chemical analysis used by analytical chemists are presented. The emphasis in the lectures and the practical component is on the analysis of real samples and the solving of practical and environmental problems.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 114 or equivalent background

1/3 • CRN 6730 • Mon, Wed, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

CHEM 301 – Organic Chemistry

Advanced topics in organic chemistry such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in structure elucidation, reaction intermediates, pericyclic reactions, organometallics in synthesis, retrosynthetic analysis, carbohydrate chemistry and biosynthesis.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 201

1/3 • CRN 9058 • Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

CHEM 302 – Inorganic and Materials Chemistry

Advanced topics in molecular and solid state inorganic chemistry including bio-inorganic, organometallic and materials chemistry, and techniques associated with the elucidation of chemical structure and reactivity.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 202

2/3 • CRN 7600 • Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

CHEM 303 – Physical and Process Chemistry

Advanced topics in physical and processes chemistry including electrochemistry, colloids and surfaces, quantum chemistry, electronic properties of solids, solid state chemistry, ceramics, nanomaterials, aspects of chemical engineering and chemical process and technology development, examples of chemical and materials industries.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 203

1/3 • CRN 7602 • Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CHEM 305 – Chemistry Synthesis Laboratory

The synthesis and purification of compounds with identification and analysis employing spectroscopic methods. This programme provides for the development of advanced laboratory skills and the use of sophisticated laboratory techniques designed to illustrate research principles and methodology in synthetic chemistry. NOTE: Two 4-hour laboratory sessions per week should be selected in MyAllocator.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 201, 205

1/3 • CRN 9059 • [Kelburn]

CHEM 306 – Chemistry Materials and Methods Laboratory

An introduction to advanced techniques and instrumentation used in modern inorganic chemistry, materials science and physical chemistry. The emphasis is on synthetic methods and instrumental techniques for structure determination and material characterisation, and the principles of measurement. A short research project is carried out.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 202, 203, 206

2/3 • CRN 9060 • [Kelburn]

Chinese

ASIA 111 – Introduction to Asian Histories and Cultures

An introduction to the histories and cultures of selected regions of Asia, with a focus on religion, social change, patterns of thought and ways of life.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 30037 • Wed 1-3pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 101 – Chinese Language 1A

This is a beginners Chinese (Mandarin) course developing basics in reading, writing, speaking and listening in Modern Standard Chinese, using pinyin and simplified characters. Various aspects of Chinese culture will also be introduced. This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. ------------------------------------------------------------ CHIN 101 CRN 17166 is a blended or mixed mode course specifically designed for students who would not otherwise be able to enrol in the course due to full-time employment or other daytime commitments. The three hours of traditional face-to-face lectures will be replaced by web-based online material. Students who enrol for this option will attend a special face-to-face tutorial and audiovisual class in a two-hour block taught outside traditional teaching hours at the Pipitea Campus. It is not intended for students who are enrolled to study on the Kelburn campus or who can attend most of the regular lecture times. Numbers are limited as this is a trial mode.

20 pts • (X) prior knowledge as determined by the academic teaching staff in Chinese

1/3 • CRN 17138 • Tue, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

CHIN 102 – Chinese Language 1B

This course is a continuation of CHIN 101, further developing students' Chinese (Mandarin) language skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening at an elementary level. Various aspects of Chinese culture will also be introduced.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 101

2/3 • CRN 17044 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 112 – Introduction to Chinese Civilisation

This is a survey course introducing some of the salient features of Chinese civilisation from prehistoric times to the present century. Topics include literature, thought and scholarship, religious beliefs, art, and the cultural and social achievements of the main dynasties. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

FHSS 110 – Exploring the World through Languages and Cultures

How do languages and cultures interrelate, and how can we read them in the world around us? This course provides students with insights into how languages and cultures shape and reflect identity by critically engaging with a wide variety of global texts and objects located in New Zealand’s capital city and beyond. Texts are studied in English translation.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

CHIN 201 – Chinese Language 2A

This course builds on the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills acquired in CHIN 102. Special attention is placed on developing students’ ability to communicate in understanding of Chinese language and culture through discussions on selected cultural topics.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 102; (X) CHIN 211

1/3 • CRN 31095 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 202 – Chinese Language 2B

As for CHIN 201, with further development of students' Chinese communication skills and their understanding of Chinese language and culture.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 201 or 211; (X) CHIN 212

2/3 • CRN 31096 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 213 – Modern Chinese Literature

A study of selected 20th-century poems, plays and short stories studied in their social and historical context. Emphasis is given to the craft of literary translation.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 201 or 211

1/3 • CRN 6741 • Mon 10-12 [Kelburn], Wed 12-2pm [Kelburn]

FHSS 210 – Language Study Abroad

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 100-level points at Victoria. The course is available both to students who have studied the language before and to students with no previous knowledge of the language. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 100-level and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 28218 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CHIN 301 – Chinese Language 3A

This course builds on the language skills acquired at 200 level. Cultural topics reinforce understanding of the language and people.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 202 or 212; (X) CHIN 311

1/3 • CRN 31097 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed, Thu, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 302 – Chinese Language 3B

The further study of language skills with translation both from and into Chinese, and communication in Chinese.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 301 or 311; (X) CHIN 312

2/3 • CRN 31098 • Tue, Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHIN 313 – Classical Chinese Language and Literature

An introductory course in the classical language, employing selected historical and philosophical texts from the pre-Qin and Han periods. Students are also instructed in the use of a range of sinological reference materials.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 202 or 212

2/3 • CRN 6621 • Wed, Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 314 – Advanced Chinese Composition and Translation

A course in advanced Chinese language, designed for native speakers of Chinese, that gives emphasis to written Chinese composition, both formal and informal, along with practical translation both to and from Chinese.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 302 or 312

3/3 • CRN 9911 • Mon 1-3pm [Kelburn]

FHSS 310 – Study Abroad for Language Students

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 points of relevant language acquisition courses at Victoria. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points of language study at 200-level or higher and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 25151 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Classical Studies, Greek and Latin

CLAS 102 – Greek Art: Myth and Culture

A survey of the development of Greek art and architecture, and what it tells us about the myths, lives and beliefs of the culture that produced it, from the Dark Ages to the end of the Hellenistic period. Illustrated with slides and with reference to Classics' own collection of Greek pottery. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 104 – The Greeks

This course offers a general introduction to ancient Greek history and culture. It tells the story of the Greeks from the Bronze Age to the coming of Rome, pausing along the way to consider the Greeks' achievements in various cultural and intellectual endeavours. 70% internal assessment, 30% examination.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 105 – Roman History and Society

The history of Rome from its origins to its fall – by way of a fast moving survey concentrating on Roman imperialism, republican ideologies, the overthrow of the republic by Caesar and Augustus, and the difficulties of coping with emperors. Special attention is given to ancient literary sources and the problems they throw up.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 106 – Ancient Civilisations: the Greeks and the Romans

The origins of Western culture in Ancient Europe: an introduction to ancient Greek and Roman civilization – history, war and conquest, politics, society, and culture.

20 pts • (X) CLAS 104, 105

2/3 • CRN 30076 • Mon, Wed, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 111 – Myth and Mythologies

CLAS 111 is a study of ancient myth in literature (poetry, drama, historiography, and other genres) and art. We will explore different ways of interpreting myths and seek to understand the meaning of myths in their contexts. Prominent themes include creation, gods, heroes, sex/gender, violence, and civilization.

20 pts • (X) CLAS 204, 304

1/3 • CRN 27016 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

GREE 101 – Introduction to Greek

An introduction to ancient Greek for beginners, with emphasis on the acquisition of basic reading skills.

20 pts • (X) GREE 112

1/3 • CRN 32058 • Mon, Tue, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GREE 102 – Elementary Greek

A study of ancient Greek, assuming basic reading skills, with emphasis on the reading of texts in Attic Greek.

20 pts • (P) GREE 101 or 112; (X) GREE 113

2/3 • CRN 32057 • Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

GREE 112 – Introduction to Greek

An introduction to ancient Greek for beginners, with emphasis on the acquisition of basic reading skills.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

GREE 113 – Elementary Greek

A study of ancient Greek, assuming basic reading skills, with emphasis on the reading of texts in Attic Greek.

20 pts • (P) GREE 112

Not offered in 2020

LATI 101 – Introduction to Latin

An introduction to the Latin Language for beginners, with emphasis on the acquisition of basic reading skills.

20 pts • (X) LATI 103

1/3 • CRN 32050 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

LATI 102 – Elementary Latin

A study of Latin, assuming basic reading skills, with emphasis on the reading of selected texts.

20 pts • (P) LATI 101 or 103 or a required standard in Latin; (X) LATI 104

2/3 • CRN 32051 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

LATI 103 – Introduction to Latin

An introduction to the Latin language for beginners, with emphasis on the acquisition of basic reading skills.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

LATI 104 – Elementary Latin

A study of Latin, assuming basic reading skills, with emphasis on the reading of selected texts.

20 pts • (P) LATI 103 or a required standard in Latin

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 203 – Greek and Roman Drama

A study of the Greek and Roman dramatists with special emphasis on the theatrical techniques of the authors and the means of production in the ancient theatre. Co-taught with CLAS 303. Offered in alternate years. 50% internal assessment, 50% examination.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 303

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 207 – Roman Social History

A study of the main features of Roman social history from the time of Augustus to AD 200. Topics include class structure, law, education, the family, slavery, poverty and public entertainment. Offered in alternate years.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 307

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 208 – Greek Society

A study of the main features of Greek society with special emphasis on Athens of the Classical period. Topics include the life cycle, population, class structure, economy, democracy, slavery, warfare and festivals.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 308

2/3 • CRN 807 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

CLAS 210 – Greek and Roman Epic

The development of Classical Epic, from Homer to Vergil and his successors. What is distinctive about epic artistry and the connection of epic poetry to the societies that value it. Co-taught with CLAS 310. Offered in alternate years. 50% internal assessment, 50% examination.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 310

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 211 – Myth and Storytelling

A study of the diverse functions of myth and storytelling in Greek and Roman literature and society, and the intersection of mythical and rational modes of thought.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 311

1/3 • CRN 6652 • Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 212 – Special Topic: Alexander to Augustus

This course surveys the transformation of the Mediterranean world – politically, economically, culturally – entrained by the rise of Macedon under Philip II and Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE, the formation of Hellenistic kingdoms after the death of Alexander (Ptolemaic Egypt, Seleucid Syria, Antigonid Macedon, Pergamum; Pontus), and the Romans’ eventual conquest of the eastern Mediterranean, signalled by the fall of Egypt in 30 BCE.

20 pts • (P) 40 points

1/3 • CRN 9130 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CLAS 214 – Special Topic: Wine, Sex, Drama, Madness, Death: Dionysos

An in-depth survey of ancient and modern understandings of Dionysos (AKA Bacchus), a god of wine, theatre, ecstasy, and the afterlife. Special attention is paid to Greek art, comedy and tragedy, epic, cult, and mystery religion, as well as representations of Dionysos from New Zealand and overseas.

20 pts • (P) 40 points; (X) CLAS 214, 314 in 2017.

3/3 • CRN 27307 • Tue, Thu 12-2pm [Kelburn]

GREE 201 – Intermediate Greek

An integrated course of literature and language.

20 pts • (P) GREE 102 or 113; (X) GREE 215

1/3 • CRN 32061 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

GREE 202 – Greek Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 201 or 215 ; (X) GREE 216

2/3 • CRN 32059 • Mon, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

GREE 215 – Intermediate Greek

An integrated course of literature and language.

20 pts • (P) GREE 113

Not offered in 2020

GREE 216 – Greek Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 215

Not offered in 2020

LATI 201 – Latin Literature and Language A

An integrated course of literature and language designed to enhance the ability of students to read Latin more easily and develop an appreciation of Latin Literature.

20 pts • (P) LATI 102 or 104 or a required standard in Latin; (X) LATI 213

1/3 • CRN 32052 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

LATI 202 – Latin Literature and Language B

An integrated course of literature and language to build on LATI 201 and further develop reading skills and literary appreciation.

20 pts • (P) LATI 201 or 213; (X) LATI 214

2/3 • CRN 32053 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

LATI 213 – Latin Literature and Language A

An integrated course of literature and language designed to enhance the ability of students to read Latin more easily and develop an appreciation of Latin Literature.

20 pts • (P) LATI 104 or a required standard in Latin

Not offered in 2020

LATI 214 – Latin Literature and Language B

An integrated course of literature and language to build on LATI 213 and further develop reading skills and literary appreciation.

20 pts • (P) LATI 213

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 301 – Death, Dying and Disposal in Ancient Greece

This course examines ancient Greek attitudes a attitudes and practices regarding death and dying through a wide range of different material, including material culture, literature, and historical sources. Topics include burial practices, 'good' and 'bad' deaths, mythical explorations of death, philosophical approaches, and views of the afterlife.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200-299; (X) CLAS 214 (2015), CLAS 314 (2015, 2018)

1/3 • CRN 32056 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

CLAS 303 – Greek and Roman Drama

A study of the Greek and Roman dramatists with special emphasis on the theatrical techniques of the authors and the means of production in the ancient theatre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 203

2/3 • CRN 813 • Tue, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

CLAS 307 – Roman Social History

A study of the main features of Roman social history from the time of Augustus to AD 200. Topics include class structure, law, education, the family, slavery, poverty and public entertainment. Co-taught with CLAS 207: reading supplementary to that for CLAS 207 is required, and a deeper and more extensive knowledge of the subject is expected in in-term work and the final examination. Offered in alternate years. 50% internal assessment, 50% examination.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 207

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 308 – Greek Social History

A study of the main features of Greek society with special emphasis on Athens of the Classical period. Topics include the life cycle, population, class structure, economy, democracy, slavery, warfare and festivals. Co-taught with CLAS 208: reading supplementary to that for CLAS 208 is required, and a deeper and more extensive knowledge of the subject is expected in in-term work and the final examination. Offered in alternate years. 50% internal assessment, 50% examination.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 208

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 310 – Greek and Roman Epic

The development of Classical Epic, from Homer to Vergil and his successors. What is distinctive about epic artistry and the connection of epic poetry to the societies that value it that value it. Offered in alternate years.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 210

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 311 – Myth and Storytelling

A study of the diverse functions of myth and storytelling in Greek and Roman literature and society, and the intersection of mythical and rational modes of thought. Co-taught with CLAS 211: reading supplementary to that for CLAS 211 is required, and a deeper and more extensive knowledge of the subject is expected in in-term work and the final examination. Offered in alternate years. 50% internal assessment, 50% examination.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 211

Not offered in 2020

CLAS 314 – Special Topic: Zenobia: Warrior Queen

This course focuses on Zenobia, queen of the third-century CE Palmyrene empire. Using literary and material evidence, it will consider Zenobia’s Palmyra and its broad trade networks, the role of powerful women in Roman and Syrian worlds, the imperial rivalries between Roman and Iranian empires, and the continuing legacy of Zenobia and Palmyra.

20 pts • (P) 40 points from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299

2/3 • CRN 27308 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

CLAS 320 – Greek Field Trip

A study of various Greek archaeological sites with special emphasis on sites in Crete. Co-taught with CLAS 420. Note: A maximum of 20 students can be accepted for this and CLAS 420 in any year. An extra fee beyond that for a 20-point course will apply.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 420

3/3 • CRN 8807 • ^ [Greek Field Trip]

tut tba

^ Limited entry course

GREE 301 – Advanced Greek Literature A

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 202 or 216; (X) GREE 315

1/3 • CRN 32060 • Mon, Tue, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GREE 302 – Advanced Greek Literature B

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 202 or GREE 216; (X) GREE 316

2/3 • CRN 32085 • Tue, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

GREE 315 – Advanced Greek Literature A

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 216

Not offered in 2020

GREE 316 – Advanced Greek Literature B

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 216

Not offered in 2020

LATI 301 – Advanced Latin Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language, and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) LATI 202 or LATI 214; (X) LATI 330

1/3 • CRN 32054 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

LATI 302 – Advanced Latin Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) LATI 202 or LATI 214; (X) LATI 331

2/3 • CRN 32055 • Mon, Tue, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

LATI 330 – Advanced Latin Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language, and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) LATI 214

Not offered in 2020

LATI 331 – Advanced Latin Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) LATI 214

Not offered in 2020

Climate, Environment & Biodiversity (Study Abroad)

BIOL 132 – Biodiversity and Conservation

An introduction to the diversity, management and conservation of microbial, plant and animal communities. Using key taxa or ecosystems as examples, students will gain an appreciation of the current issues facing the world's biodiversity, and explore possible methods for conservation, including habitat restoration, translocation, and predator control.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 568 • [Distance (NZ)]

BTEC 101 – Introduction to Biotechnology

The aims of this course are to provide a solid understanding of the pure and applied science underlying the biotechnology industry, and to provide insight into the cultural and ethical values, and economic and political issues, that this science must align with. Particular focus in lectures will be given to the techniques and applications of recombinant biotechnology in microbes, plants & animals; harnessing natural resources; health-related biotechnology; reproductive biotechnology; environmental biotechnology; and regulation of biotechnology.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 11092 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ESCI 111 – The Earth System: An Introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Sciences

An introduction to fundamental concepts in Physical Geography and Earth Sciences. The physical processes that shape and have shaped the Earth are the focus of this course. An important emphasis is on human interaction with the environment. This course provides fundamental knowledge for understanding our environment and a platform for further study. Field work in the Wellington area is included.

15 pts • (X) GEOG 111 (D) GEOG 111

1/3 • CRN 9469 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 132 – Antarctica: Unfreezing the Continent

A broad introduction to Antarctica, including its history, exploration, weather, geology, fauna and management. Its role in the global climate system is emphasised. This course is primarily designed for non-science majors.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 9062 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

GEOG 112 – Introduction to Human Geography and Development Studies

An introduction to the basic concepts and processes of human geography and development, using case studies from the Asia Pacific region and New Zealand's place within it.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 1651 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

GEOG 114 – Environment and Resources: the Foundations

This course integrates the physical, social, economic, and political factors associated with environmental change. First, the course introduces the earth systems associated with environmental change (both natural and human induced). Second, the course explore the social, political and economic implications of contemporary environmental issues and human-environment relations.

15 pts • (X) ENVI 114

1/3 • CRN 7021 • Tue, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

PHYS 131 – Energy and Environmental Physics

This course uses basic physical concepts to study energy, Earth's energy resources and the physical environment. The advantages, disadvantages and environmental impact of various renewable and non-renewable energy resources are investigated, with particular emphasis on the New Zealand situation. Other environmental topics covered include thermal radiation, the greenhouse effect and global warming, atmospheric circulation and climate patterns, properties of the ozone layer, noise pollution, the physics of earthquake and extreme weather hazards, radiation ... and more.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 1177 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab, tut tba

SARC 131 – Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Whakaora i Te Taiao Hangahanga

The definitions and macro contexts of sustainability, emphasising the roles, responsibilities and opportunities for professionals in the designed and built environment. The course covers climate and microclimate, resources, materials production, environmental impact and social equity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18169 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 210 – Environmental Anthropology

This course explores human relationships with ecological and material environments. It will examine diverse cultural perceptions of and approaches to the environment, the relationship between nature and culture, and anthropology’s contribution to contemporary ecological and climate debates.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

BIOL 219 – New Zealand Flora and Fauna

Understanding the unique biological history of Aotearoa, New Zealand. This course is offered in two formats. The first (CRN 8036) is second trimester and consists of lectures, laboratories and field trips while the second offering (CRN 8828) is an intensive 10-day version consisting of lectures, laboratories and field trips and is offered in the first part of the third trimester.

15 pts • (P) 60 points

2/3 • CRN 8036 • [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 8828 • [Kelburn]

BIOL 228 – Animal Diversity

Diversity, form, and function of animals; an overview of the taxonomic diversity of all animals; focused study of selected terrestrial and aquatic taxa, including sponges, cnidarians, annelids, molluscs, arthropods and vertebrates.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 114

1/3 • CRN 9215 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

ESCI 241 – Introductory Field Geology

An introduction to field techniques in geology held at the Geology department's field station at Onekaka, near Takaka, Northwest Nelson. In 2020 this field course is offered 22-29 February 2020, and/or 11-18 April 2020 (depending on enrolments/staff availability), and/or 18-25 April 2020 (also depending on enrolments/staff availability). Students will be instructed to sign up for one of these offerings.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

block dates/3 • CRN 17287 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

GEOG 214 – Environment and Resources: New Zealand Perspectives

This course examines major environmental issues and challenges New Zealand faces today. The course highlights policy and management frameworks in place to address these environmental issues. Students also critically appraise how well current policy and management mechanisms achieve the goal of environmental sustainability.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 114 or 15 approved points; (X) ENVI 214

2/3 • CRN 6004 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

GEOG 217 – Human Geography: Approaching Our World

This course explores the evolution of human geography and its relevance to local and global issues over time. We will explore and compare different human geography approaches to our world and apply them to various spheres of human geography (e.g. nature, economics, politics). Students will be introduced to key ideas, concepts and thinkers of the discipline over time.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 112; ENVI/GEOG 114 or 15 approved 100-level pts

2/3 • CRN 26056 • Mon, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 220 – Hydrology and Climate

This course provides the skills and training necessary to explore and understand the core hydrological and climatic processes that cause change within the environment, particularly the role of water. It will help you to understand why climate varies spatially, and why vegetation has such an important influence on the availability and timing of moisture and stream flow. It will also examine how hydrological and climatic systems respond to human interaction and environmental change. The emphasis will be on providing the skills necessary to interpret the processes controlling the spatial and temporal variability in climate and water availability.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 114, ESCI/GEOG 111, 15 100-level MATH or STAT points

2/3 • CRN 17169 • Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

SARC 221 – Building Materials and Construction / Te Waihanga me ngā Momo Rauemi

Buildings are studied as assemblages of distinct yet interrelated systems. Students explore basic materials and methods of construction, gaining insight to structural and other performance outcomes. Construction is discussed as a dimension in the overall design activity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 131

1/3 • CRN 18456 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

SARC 223 – Human Environmental Science / Te Āhurutanga o te Taiao

The methods of achieving building environmental conditions that relate to the requirements of building users. The course covers climatic analysis and specifications of the environmental performance of buildings, together with the thermal, visual, acoustic, and aerodynamic principles of building elements; plus the services systems required to control and maintain these conditions.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121; (X) BILD 223; SARC 281 in 2014-2017

2/3 • CRN 18395 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

SCIS 212 – Energy, Society and the Future

This course overviews different energy sources, past, present (including thermal, gravity and fluid, and solar) and future, and examines associated scientific, environmental, economic and social issues including issues specific to New Zealand and Maori. On completion, students will be able to assess energy-related issues and arguments with reference to sound scientific and historical information.

15 pts • (P) 60 100-level points (X) SCIE 201 in 2013-2015; SCIE 212 in 2016-2017

2/3 • CRN 30118 • [Distance (NZ)]

TOUR 250 – Managing Visitor Impacts

A systematic introduction to the management of tourism impacts with emphasis on social and cultural systems, economy and the physical environment. The course covers a range of analytical approaches, including environmental impact analysis, social assessment, and economic multiplier analysis.

20 pts • (P) 40 TOUR pts

Not offered in 2020

BIOL 325 – Global Change Biology: The Ecology of Our Planet Under Stress

An introduction to the ecophysiological responses of plants and animals to environmental and anthropogenic stress, with an emphasis on the effects of changes in global climate and land use. The course focuses on biological functions as they are affected by interactions with their physical, chemical and biotic environments.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level BIOL pts

1/3 • CRN 19701 • Tue, Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

ENSC 301 – Topics in Environmental Science

Topics in environmental science that may include: environmental toxicology, Antarctica and environmental change, greenhouse effect environmental risk assessment, mathematical modelling of environmental problems; human health and ecology, atmosphere and ocean dynamics and natural resource management. This course will allow students to integrate their science discipline into an environmental framework and discuss, analyse and apply these ideas.

20 pts • (P) 90 pts of 200-level study in approved subjects from the Science schedule; (C) ENSC 302 or 303 and admission to the major in Environmental Science.

1/3 • CRN 18345 • Mon, Thu 12-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ESCI 301 – Global Change: Earth Processes and History

A study of modern and past Earth environments and the key processes that have shaped them. This course focuses on understanding and interpreting evidence from the geological record for environmental change and using this knowledge to help predict future variability, with specific focus on Antarctica, Southwest Pacific and New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 202; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further points from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193); (C) ESCI 341 or GEOG 323

1/3 • CRN 15139 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 344 – Field Geophysics

Methods and techniques for field geophysical surveys. Also taught as GPHS 344. This field trip is held in the mid- trimester break (13-17 April 2020) along with supporting lectures.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (C) ESCI 305

block dates/3 • CRN 17288 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

GEOG 314 – Advanced Environment and Resources: Global Issues

Building on GEOG 114 and 214 this course takes a global perspective to explore: pressures on resources that result from a global economy; cultural, societal and historical influences that shape how we value, use and manipulate resources and the environment; interdisciplinary approaches to addressing contemporary environmental problems.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 214 (X) ENVI 314

2/3 • CRN 6011 • Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

GEOG 321 – Ice and Climate

An overview of the climate system and the cryosphere, focussing on interactions between the two, covering (1) comprehensive treatment of climate processes over the 2000 years leading into the modern era of anthropogenic influence; (2) case studies of ice-climate interactions; recent behaviour of ice sheets, mountain glaciers and sea ice.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 220, one of (BIOL/GEOG 222, GEOG 223, 224); 15 further pts from MATH 132-177, PHYS 131 or (STAT 193 or equivalent) not previously taken

2/3 • CRN 26057 • Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

INFO 381 – Special Topic: Adv Web Application Development

Using a project-based approach in an intensive studio mode delivery, students will gain experience in developing an IT solution using a full stack web development framework. This course briefly introduces front-end web development and agile principles and practices of agile development. It focuses primarily on back-end web technologies and the experience of developing a minimum viable product.

15 pts • (P) B or better in INFO226

3/3 • CRN 11107 • Mon 9.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

INTP 302 – International Politics of the Environment

This course introduces the study of global environmental politics. It focuses on the international relations of climate change, environmental protection, pollution, resource management, energy security, food and other issues of environmental concern. It applies international relations theory, including environmental and green political theory, to analyse today’s most important environmental challenges.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from INTP 200-299; POLS 200-299

2/3 • CRN 28010 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

PHYS 343 – Topics in Applied Physics

Students will study four topics in applied physics. Topics may include: heat and the global greenhouse, fluids, percolation and pollution management, medical imaging techniques, solar technology, wind and wave energy resources, weather systems and climate change, applications of opto-electronic devices and applications of nuclear physics.

15 pts • (P) 30 200-level PHYS points

2/3 • CRN 18317 • Mon, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SCIS 301 – ST: Historical Issues in Science in Society

This course explores a range of environmental, scientific, and technological issues through the 19th and 20th centuries in Aotearoa New Zealand and the wider Asia-Pacific region. Topics and issues, explored through a historical lens, may include: nuclear technology, matauranga Māori, public engagement with science, science and agriculture, health, human responses to climate and climate change, conservation, pest management, and the role of gardens and parks. On completion, students will be able to put current issues in a historical context.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points

1/3 • CRN 30127 • [Distance (NZ)]

Commerce

FCOM 111 – Government, Law and Business

This course sets the context for the BCom degree acquainting students with the legal and governmental environment that New Zealand firms operate in.

15 pts • (X) FCOM 110

1/3 • CRN 17242 • (L1) Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 17243 • (L2) Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 17244 • (L3) Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 17245 • (L4) Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 28422 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

FCOM 201 – Special Topic: Politics & Policies of Wellbeing

This course examines the intellectual origins of ‘wellbeing' and how the notion is informing contemporary debates in politics and in public policy both in Aotearoa/New Zealand and other jurisdictions.

15 pts • (P) 30 points at 100 level in any degree.

3/3 • CRN 6381 • Tue, Thu 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

Commercial Law

COML 111 – Law for Business

A general introduction to the legal issues encountered in small and start-up businesses. A wide variety of legal issues will be covered in this context, including the business structure, contract law, consumer law, the law relating to property, including intellectual property and dispute resolution and business failure.

15 pts

3/3 • CRN 9659 • Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 203 – Legal Environment of Business

An overview of the legal system and the legislative process with an emphasis on their impact on the business environment, including elements of contract, administrative law and the law of organisations.

15 pts • (P) FCOM 111; (X) two of LAWS 121-123

1/3 • CRN 6748 • Wed, Fri 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 896 • Tue, Thu 4.30-5.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 204 – Law of Organisations

An examination of the law of business organisations.

15 pts • (P) COML 203 or 35 LAWS pts; (X) COML 303, LAWS 360, 361

1/3 • CRN 18159 • Tue, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 19764 • Mon, Wed 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 205 – Consumer Law

The law relating to consumers.

15 pts • (P) COML 203 or 35 LAWS pts

2/3 • CRN 18309 • Mon 10.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 302 – The Law of Work

The law governing the relationship between employees and employers; collective bargaining and organisations of workers in New Zealand; and selected areas of international and comparative Labour Law.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts; (X) LAWS 355

1/3 • CRN 902 • Wed, Fri 8.30-9.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 304 – Competition Law

The law relating to restrictive trade practices, and business acquisitions under the Commerce Act 1986.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCA pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts; ECON 130; (X) LAWS 356 (1995 or after)

Not offered in 2020

COML 306 – Law of International Business

This course examines the law and practice affecting international business, including New Zealand's multilateral trading relationships, the law affecting international commercial transactions including international sales, methods of doing business abroad and the international protection of intellectual property rights.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts; (X) LAWS 354 (1995 or after)

2/3 • CRN 910 • Wed, Fri 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 307 – Legal Issues for e-Commerce

Selected aspects of the law relating to e-commerce, including electronic transactions, intellectual property, privacy, consumer payment and protection, cross-border concerns and tax implications.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts

Not offered in 2020

COML 308 – Marketing Law

This course examines selected legal issues affecting the marketing of a new product, from its inception and development to its promotion and distribution. To a lesser extent, legal issues affecting the marketing of a new service are also considered.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts

2/3 • CRN 6734 • Tue, Fri 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 309 – Banking Law and Regulation in New Zealand

Selected areas from the law of banking, including bank-customer relationship, negotiable instruments, liability of paying and collecting banks, debit/credit/smart cards, electronic payments, securities for bank lending, letters of credit, and the Reserve Bank and its functions.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts; (X) LAWS 352 (1995 or after)

1/3 • CRN 9006 • Tue, Thu 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

COML 310 – Business Contracts

The law relating to business contracts.

15 pts • (P) COML 203 or 35 LAWS pts; (X) COML 305, LAWS 211

1/3 • CRN 18310 • Mon, Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 19737 • Mon, Thu 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 312 – Intellectual Property and Business Innovation

This course provides students with an understanding of intellectual property laws that are essential tools for success in an innovation-based business. The course includes lectures on the patent system, trade secrets, copyright, registered designs, trade marks and intellectual property management for business.

15 pts • (P) COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts or 15 approved 200-level pts; (X) COML 321 (2017-2019), LAWS 353

1/3 • CRN 32037 • Mon, Wed 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea], [Pipitea]

COML 320 – Special Topic: Law, Decision-Making and Public Health

This course focuses on decision-making, policy and public health from a legal perspective.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts.

2/3 • CRN 15515 • Tue 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea], Thu 10.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

COML 322 – Approved Personal Course of Study

A customised course in an approved area or application of commercial law.

15 pts • (P) COML 203

Not offered in 2020

Communication

COMS 101 – Introduction to Communication Studies

The course provides students with a foundation in the theoretical principles and practices of communication. It introduces theories of how communication shapes and responds to human relationships in different interpersonal, digital/online, organisational, bicultural and intercultural contexts. This includes critical reflection on how communication processes can reproduce or challenge power relations. The factors influencing the efficacy in communication in different situations will also be discussed and analysed. Theoretical learning is applied through oral, written and/or non-verbal/visual modes of communication.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 32023 • Tue 4-6pm [Kelburn]

ENGL 172 – Reading and Writing Poetry

An introduction to between 50 and 100 poems by poets ranging from Shakespeare to Anne Carson. Students will also be introduced to some of the best critical readings on individual poems, and selected essays by leading poetry critics. Finally, students will learn the basic skills needed to write good poetry. The course will teach skills in both critical and creative writing.

20 pts • (X) FHSS 101 2016-2018

2/3 • CRN 32024 • (L1) Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 32222 • (L2) Mon, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ENGL 172 – Reading and Writing Poetry

An introduction to between 50 and 100 poems by poets ranging from Shakespeare to Anne Carson. Students will also be introduced to some of the best critical readings on individual poems, and selected essays by leading poetry critics. Finally, students will learn the basic skills needed to write good poetry. The course will teach skills in both critical and creative writing.

20 pts • (X) FHSS 101 2016-2018

LCCM 171 – The Art of Writing: Literary and Creative Communication

Even in a modern world dominated by visual and digital media, written communication remains the most essential and powerful tool not only in the university but in all social and professional contexts. This course draws on traditions of literary and creative writing to teach the skills of clear, persuasive, and imaginative written communication. You will analyse and create critical and personal forms of writing which may include the essay, the review, the blog, the social media post, the memoir and the polemic. The course complements the academic writing skills taught in WRIT 101.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 32025 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn]

COMS 201 – Approaches to Communication Research

This course aims to develop students' critical academic literacy by providing an overview of the principal theories and methods used to conduct research into media industries, texts, audiences and platforms. The course introduces scientific versus humanistic paradigms, and quantitative versus qualitative methods. Political economy and cultural studies traditions are compared and contrasted, and Māori approaches to communication research are discussed.

20 pts • (P) COMS 101

Not offered in 2020

COMS 202 – Communication and Society

This course examines the relationship between communication media and the broader social context of politics, culture and economics. The historical evolution of specific communication and media technologies and systems and their relationship to historical and contemporary social change is analysed. This includes consideration of the characteristics of cultures based on different modalities of communication (e.g. oral, print, mass and digital) as well as the political and economic possibilities afforded by particular technological forms. This course is offered for the first time in 2021.

20 pts • (P) COMS 101, MDIA 102

Not offered in 2020

COMS 203 – Organisational Communication

This course covers a range of perspectives on organisational communication, including analysis of: organisational systems and structures; information networks and flows; power-relations and conflict; and cultural forms. This includes consideration of the practical and ethical issues arising from digital communication and information technologies, and the use of social media in contemporary organisations. Organisational communication practices within Māori and Pasifika contexts are also considered. This course will be offered for the first time in 2021.

20 pts • (P) COMS 101, MDIA 102

Not offered in 2020

ICOM 201 – Approaches to Intercultural Communication

This course is designed for students with experience in the study of languages and cultures to explore theories and practices of intercultural communication, which they will then apply in case studies with a view to identifying effective communicative strategies in intercultural interactions. Topics covered include stereotyping and cross-cultural social media. This course is offered for the first time in 2021.

20 pts • (P) 40 points from 100-199 CHIN, FREN, GERM, GREE, ITAL, JAPA, LATI, MAOR, NZSL, SAMO, SPAN

Not offered in 2020

Communication Design

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design / Hoahoa ā-Whakairoiro

This course explores the basics of graphic design through a hands-on visual identity project. Students will learn about logos, typography, colour palettes, style guides, and more. It provides a good introduction to Communication Design skills. Students will learn about professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of materials that express the visual identity and voice of a brand.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30061 • Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 201 – Animation and Visual Effects II / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata II

This course explores 3D design principles unique to creating animation and visual effects media, and techniques of 3D design. Students will create a series of digital artefacts for the screen. Tutorials cover development methods specific to digital content, with an emphasis on engaging in an effective design process. In lab sessions students will use 3D modelling software and 2D image manipulation software to generate compelling and innovative visual imagery that demonstrates an understanding of animation and visual effects media.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 132; CGRA 151 or acceptance into the ANFX major

1/3 • CRN 31161 • Wed 3.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 211 – Character Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Kiripuaki I

This course offers an introduction to animated storytelling through the art of character animation. We survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, from large scale studio features to experimental auteur films. In response students will create their own animated films by designing, building and rigging characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students will gain insight into animated film production workflows and will acquire the technical skills to bring their story ideas to fruition. This course will be offered for the first time in 2020.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 132; and 15 further points from the BDI or BAS Schedules

2/3 • CRN 31162 • Mon 5.30-6.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 4.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 221 – Digital 2D Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua I

This course introduces digital 2D and frame-by-frame techniques in modern animation practice. Historical and contemporary examples will be studied including classic feature films, independent shorts, music videos, and video games. Students will apply basic animation principles and learn introductory 2D techniques within a digital workflow, suitable to professional or personal practice.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses

2/3 • CRN 32097 • ^ Mon 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 3.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 231 – Stop Motion Animation / Pakiwaituhi Whakatū Nekehanga

The course explores techniques in stop-motion puppet construction, onset lighting, and animation. Students will build a fully articulated puppet and light and animate it using a combination of established industry practices such as digital and in-camera frame-by-frame techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses

Not offered in 2020

ANFX 271 – History of Animation and Visual Effects / Hītōria Pakiwaituhi, Mariko Ataata

This course explores how technology and filmmaking have utilised visual effects as an integral storytelling tool since the earliest days of cinema. Students will explore various forms including the cinema of attractions, the phenomenon of the uncanny valley and international precedents, the contemporary high-fantasy of blockbuster Hollywood films, and finally the future of the form.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ANFX 272 – Fictional Narratives – Storytelling for Design / Kōrero Pakiwaitara – Pakiwaitara Hei Hoahoa

This course explores the ideation and practical process of writing and visual development for animated media. Core principles such as structure, plot, character, world building and personal vision are explored alongside the way in which technology and transmedia practices are increasingly shaping storytelling.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 32001 • Tue 3.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

COMD 201 – Type & Image I / Te Momo me te Whakaahua I

This course is about working with type. Students will learn the anatomy, rules and techniques of typography, the history of type development and how this informs the use of type in contemporary communication. They will become familiar with both historical and contemporary typographic styles and genres and develop a critical eye for the complexities of typography. There will be an intensive study of typographic hierarchies and expressive typography through practical exercises.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the COMD major

1/3 • CRN 30072 • ^ Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 211 – Drawing II / Tuhi Pikitia II

This course will allow students to practice traditional and contemporary approaches to both observational and imaginative drawing. In addition to building on skills and techniques developed in DSDN 152 Drawing I, students will be encouraged to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 152 and 15 further points from the BDI or BAS Schedules

1/3 • CRN 30073 • Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

COMD 231 – Illustration / Pikitia Whakaari

In this course students will learn to illustrate and use illustration thoughtfully and effectively in a range of media. Historical and contemporary approaches will be studied from various perspectives: aesthetic, social, and commercial. Students will develop and complete illustration project briefs using a range of digital and physical tools and techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS Schedules or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30074 • ^ Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 241 – Visual Narratives / Ngā Paki Ataata

This course focuses on the structure and methods of effective storytelling, as expressed visually. Readings provide a broad survey of stories that employ visual narratives in innovative or instructive ways. Techniques are drawn from comics, books, graphic novels, film, children's books, and animation. Students learn how to tell a story using visual language.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM courses or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30075 • ^ Mon 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 251 – Information Design / Hoahoa ā-Pārongo

This course addresses the demand for well-designed visual presentation of data in the information age. The course is interdisciplinary, combining skills from graphic design, interaction design, and data science. Students practice information design skills with applications beyond the traditional design professions. Students will shape data-driven messages in order to make knowledge accessible visually. This course will first be offered in 2021.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 261 – Motion Design I / Hoahoa ā-Nekehanga I

This course introduces basic concepts of motion design and time-based media in communication and graphic environments. Topics covered include introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery, graphic animation, as well as creative strategies and workflow. Students will apply concepts from motion design to time-based projects and outputs.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32098 • ^ Tue, Thu 3.30-5pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

1/3 • CRN 32107 • Tue 3.30-5pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 32108 • Tue 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 301 – Animation and Visual Effects III / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata III

Advanced topics in animation will be explored in this course, particularly around newly emerging technologies and procedural processes. Students will have the opportunity to conduct research, informing their own path for exploration in one of three areas: data acquisition, procedural modelling or asset development. These explorations will be put into practice – incorporating this knowledge in a short production.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 201

1/3 • CRN 32002 • Tue, Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 311 – Character Animation II / Pakiwaituhi ā-Kiripuaki II

This course builds on Character Animation I and continues to examine animation through the art of character animation. Students survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, focusing on contemporary animation. Students will design, build, and rig characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students delve deeper into animated film production workflows and will refine the technical skills required to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 211

Not offered in 2020

COMD 301 – Communication Design Capstone

Starting from seminar-style discussions, students will develop their own briefs that address an advanced communication design problem, building and expanding upon individual skills and interests. This course first runs in 2020.

20 pts • (P) 60 points from COMD 200-399

Not offered in 2020

COMD 302 – Type & Image II / Te Momo me te Whakaahua II

Students will build on the typographic principles learnt in COMD 201 Type & Image I and apply them to more ambitious projects. They will hone and refine their critical eye for typography and delve deeper into its anatomy, materiality, and complexities. There will be an intensive study of typographic hierarchies and expressive typography through practical exercises. Projects will introduce opportunities to work within constraints and also to challenge traditional typographic rules.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including COMD 201

2/3 • CRN 32099 • ^ Wed 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 321 – Advertising in Aotearoa

Students will learn the historical developments in advertising along with current practises, used to maximise the potential for promoting products/services or addressing a contemporaneously vital issue. Working from graphic design and illustration principles, students will develop a comprehensive advertising campaign as a final project. This course will first run in 2020.

20 pts • (P) COMD 201, 231

Not offered in 2020

COMD 325 – Print Media Now: Design for Publications / Arapāho Mātātuhi o Nāianei: Hoahoa mō ngā Whakaputanga

This course introduces students to specialist print design skills and knowledge. Print will be explored in many contexts, from hot metal and letterpress processes through the University’s own letterpress workshop, through to contemporary in-studio processes, such as silkscreen printing and risograph printing. There will be a particular emphasis on the craft of book design, taking a broad view of what defines a book – from simple zine-making through to more complex artefacts.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 32101 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 331 – Concept Art and World Building / Toi Ariā me te Waihanga ā-Ao

In this course students will use a variety of techniques to craft concepts and visual images that convey speculative or fictional worlds. Contemporary and historical approaches to concept art will be critically analysed. World building across media (illustration, graphic novels, film, animation, books, and games) will be explored through examples and exercises.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM/THEA/WRIT courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 335 – Comics and Graphic Novels / Pukawaituhi me ngā Pakimaero Waituhi

This course examines formal aspects of comics and graphic novels, their historical development, visual vocabulary, and narrative applications. Readings provide examples of effective graphic storytelling and survey theoretical and practical approaches to the form. Students will develop and complete their own comics.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM/THEA/WRIT courses or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32104 • ^ Mon 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 342 – Generative Graphic Design / Hoahoa Waihanga Whakairoiro

Students will use a design process, set of instructions, or computer programme, to generate a solution that blends design artistry with artificially generated output. This blend of traditional and emerging techniques will produce surprising outcomes. Students will create and analyse generative works. The purpose of the course is to explore how generative techniques can add to a design practice.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 351 – Writing for Design / Tuhituhi mō te Hoahoa

Students taking this course will develop a command of writing styles for use in creative practice. Projects will delve into self-reflective and exploratory writing about design, as well as critical interpretation. The course will also cover writing techniques that serve creative practice, such as client briefs, feedback and reports.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI schedule or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 30081 • Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

COMD 361 – Motion Design II / Hoahoa ā-Nekehanga II

This course expands upon the basic concepts mastered in COMD 261 Motion Design I, introducing specialised skills and blended techniques. Weekly screenings of contemporary motion design work will be used as a basis for discussion and analysis of intermediate motion design principles. Through applied practice, students will explore specialised design, motion, and narrative communication in a series of self-designed and directed projects. This course will first be offered in 2021.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including COMD 261

Not offered in 2020

COMD 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent student work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 382 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent student work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 390 – Communication Design Capstone: Plan, Produce, Publish / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Kōrero Hoahoa: Whakamahere, Whakatinana, Whakaputa

In this course students produce a final work to demonstrate the skills and knowledge gained in Communication Design. Students complete a large studio-based project or portfolio demonstrating design mastery. In seminar-style discussions, students develop their own briefs or portfolio goals that address advanced problems or questions in communication design. Projects are published, and engagement with a community beyond the school is a goal of the work in this course.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including COMD 201 (X) COMD 301

2/3 • CRN 32105 • ^ Mon 10.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Computer Graphics

CGRA 151 – Introduction to Computer Graphics

Introduces necessary background, fundamental concepts, and basic algorithms of Computer Graphics, including human visual perception, representation of colour and images, representation of 2D and 3D spaces, manipulation, movement and drawing of 2D and 3D objects. Students will use an appropriate modern programming language to investigate many of the ideas presented in the lectured material.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112 or DSDN 142; 15 pts from (ENGR 121, MATH 100-199) or 16 AS credits NCEA Level 3 mathematics (or equivalent)

2/3 • CRN 28221 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

DSDN 132 – Animation and Visual Effects I / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Atataunaki I

This course introduces students to the practice of digital asset creation and animation for narrative media. Students will develop basic skill sets central to animation and visual effects production, including polygonal modelling, surface shading, texturing, lighting, and animation using 3D digital content creation software. Practical skills are complemented with design principles and technical concepts related to this studio practice.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

1/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 30003 • ^ tba [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MATH 151 – Algebra

An introduction to linear algebra, including matrices and vectors, systems of linear equations, complex numbers, eigenvectors, and algebraic structures.

15 pts • (P) 16 achievement standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics (or equivalent) or MATH 132

1/3 • CRN 17161 • Tue, Thu, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

MATH 161 – Discrete Mathematics and Logic

Logic underlies all of mathematics. In this course we will introduce the basic notions of logic, and discuss what makes some arguments good (or valid), while other arguments are invalid. This leads to a definition of a mathematical proof, particularly mathematical induction. Other topics include sets, relations, functions, elementary counting principles, properties of divisibility of the integers, and polynomials. The second half of the course introduces the fundamental concepts of graph theory, which is the study of networks.

15 pts • (P) Approved level of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Calculus or one of (ENGR 121-123, B+ or better in MATH 132, MATH 141-177, QUAN 111) or equivalent background in mathematics.

2/3 • CRN 17162 • Tue, Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

CGRA 251 – Computer Graphics

This course addresses the central algorithms, mathematical knowledge and programming for Computer Graphics. It will include topics such as geometry manipulation and computing, curvature and graphics applications of linear algebra and numerical integration. Students will implement algorithms using scripting tools and develop simple plugins for 3D computer graphics tools.

15 pts • (P) CGRA 151, NWEN 241; ENGR 121 or MATH 151 or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 28399 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

CGRA 350 – Real-time 3D Computer Graphics

This course addresses graphics programming for real-time 3D graphics. It covers graphics APIs, in particular OpenGL, and the graphics processing pipeline (including geometry processing, viewing, projection, transformation, illumination, texture mapping). It also addresses display hardware and graphics cards. Please note: this course will run for the first time in 2018

15 pts • (P) CGRA 251, COMP 261, NWEN 241

2/3 • CRN 28400 • Tue, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CGRA 351 – Visual Effects Programming

This course addresses the complete process of generating a computer graphics visual effects shot, from motion capture, through rigging and rendering, to compositing into a recorded video scene. The project work emphasises the algorithms and programming aspects of building a pipeline. The course will involve group work, done in conjunction with Media Design students, working with a variety of advanced Computer Graphics tools. Please note: this course runs for the first time in 2018.

15 pts • (P) CGRA 251, MDDN 241; COMP 261 or NWEN 241

Not offered in 2020

CGRA 352 – Image-based Graphics

Image-based graphics brings together the power visual media content to produce vivid, compelling, and meaningful computer graphics. This course studies ways of manipulating and combining images and videos, including image filtering, image manipulation, and video processing.

15 pts • (P) CGRA 251; COMP 261 or NWEN 241

1/3 • CRN 30096 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

MDDN 311 – Postproduction and Special Effects

Digital media products such as film special effects and games often require the creation of novel visual experiences while working within large professional graphics software packages. In this course students will gain experience stretching the boundaries of these packages, including the use of programmed extension and generative approaches.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 132, MDDN 211, 20 further pts from MDDN 200-level

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 342 – Creative Coding III / Waehere ā-Auaha III

Creative Coding III builds on the content taught in Creative Coding I and II and extends the use of procedural and parameterised design strategies. Students will be taught advanced computer graphics and data mapping techniques in order to create dynamic visuals and assets for use in screen-based media.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including MDDN 242

2/3 • CRN 28190 • ^ Mon, Thu 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 343 – Advanced Computer Game Design

Advanced techniques in computer game design and examination of the emerging areas of computer gaming and professional practice. The course focuses on a production-based approach where students build their own computer games using 3D tools for modelling, interactive animation and experiences that are immersive.

20 pts • (P) Two courses from ANFX 201, MDDN 243, 241, 242

Not offered in 2020

Computer Science

See also Software Engineering and Network Engineering, and (for postgraduate level) Logic and Computation

CGRA 151 – Introduction to Computer Graphics

Introduces necessary background, fundamental concepts, and basic algorithms of Computer Graphics, including human visual perception, representation of colour and images, representation of 2D and 3D spaces, manipulation, movement and drawing of 2D and 3D objects. Students will use an appropriate modern programming language to investigate many of the ideas presented in the lectured material.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112 or DSDN 142; 15 pts from (ENGR 121, MATH 100-199) or 16 AS credits NCEA Level 3 mathematics (or equivalent)

2/3 • CRN 28221 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

COMP 102 – Introduction to Computer Program Design

This course introduces the fundamentals of programming in a high-level programming language (Java), using an object oriented approach to program design. Students develop their programming skills by constructing computer programs for a variety of applications. The course provides a foundation for all later courses in computer science, and develops programming skills useful for students in many other disciplines.

15 pts • (X) COMP 112

1/3 • CRN 943 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 9792 • Mon, Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

lab, tut tba

COMP 103 – Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms

This course focuses on the techniques for designing, building and analysing computer programs that deal with large collections of data. The course addresses techniques for programming with collections of data, and the data structures and algorithms needed to implement these collections. The course expands programming skills and provides an understanding of the principles of data abstraction, algorithm design, and the analysis of algorithms fundamental to computer science.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112

2/3 • CRN 945 • Tue, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31041 • Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

lab tba

COMP 112 – Introduction to Computer Science

This course introduces a range of important concepts and topics across Computer Science, Software Engineering and Network Engineering. Students will also gain a solid foundation of programming skills in object oriented programming. The course is an entry point to the BE(Hons) and BSc in Computer Science for students who already have basic programming skills.

15 pts • (P) 14 AS level 3 NCEA credits in Digital Technology including 6 credits in Computer Programming, or COMP 132, or equivalent programming experience (X) COMP 102

1/3 • CRN 26034 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

COMP 132 – Programming for the Natural and Social Sciences

This course addresses the fundamental programming skills required to process, transform, analyse and present data. The course will explore a range of kinds of data, kinds of analysis and kinds of visualisation that can be performed on the data, and give students expertise in a variety of programming techniques and tools to accomplish this analysis and visualisation. The practical assignments will enable students to develop programming skills that they will be able to apply in many different fields of study. The course does not assume any background in programming.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30095 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

CYBR 171 – Cybersecurity Fundamentals

This course examines how cybersecurity affects individuals and society and aims to develop understanding that the concept of cybersecurity goes beyond technology to include people, information, and processes. It will examine key concepts as well as current issues and debates about how to respond to cybersecurity. Note that this course will involve using a range of security tools but does not involve programming. Students will also write short essays related to current debates around cybersecurity issues.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30039 • Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 121 – Engineering Mathematics Foundations

An introduction to the range of mathematical techniques employed by engineers, including functions and calculus, linear algebra and vector geometry, probability and statistics. There is an emphasis on applications and modelling.

15 pts • (P) 16 AS credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics (or equivalent) or MATH 132; (X) Any pair (MATH 141/QUAN 111, MATH 151/161/177)

1/3 • CRN 26052 • Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 31158 • Mon, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENGR 122 – Engineering Mathematics with Calculus

Further mathematical techniques employed by electronic and computer systems engineers, with emphasis on methods of calculus, differential equations and linear Algebra. There is an emphasis on engineering applications and use of software.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 or MATH 141; (X) the pair (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 26053 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGR 123 – Engineering Mathematics with Logic and Statistics

Mathematical techniques employed by network and software engineers, including methods of combinatorics, logic, probability and decision theory. The course emphasises engineering applications of these techniques.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 (X) the pair MATH 161, (MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193);

2/3 • CRN 27044 • Mon, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31159 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 131 – Programming for Software Development

This course is the primary entry point for graduate students wishing to enter the Master of Software Development programme within the Wellington ICT Graduate School. Students will learn to design, read, write and debug small programs while using standard programming tools. The course will be taught as an intensive full time 5 week block course.

15 pts • (P) Applied for MSwDev; (X) COMP 102, 103, 112

Not offered in 2020

COMP 261 – Algorithms and Data Structures

This course covers a range of algorithms and data structures building on the fundamental structures and algorithms from COMP 103. The major areas covered are: graph algorithms, graphics algorithms and advanced data structures. This course takes a practical approach focusing on the implementation of a wide variety of algorithms.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103, ENGR 123 or MATH 161

1/3 • CRN 18314 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 271 – Secure Programming

This course addresses the concepts, techniques and tools required for developing software that reliably preserves the security properties of the information and systems they protect. The course covers common software vulnerabilities, specifying security requirements, secure design principles and techniques for evaluating software security. Practical work will involve developing and evaluating the security of C and Java programs. NB: this course will first run in 2019.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, NWEN 241

2/3 • CRN 30040 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

NWEN 241 – Systems Programming

This course considers the issues raised when programming at a low-level, for example in embedded systems, OS system level, or network protocol stacks. It includes an introduction to C language programming and motivating examples related to a wide variety of applications of system programming.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18315 • Tue, Thu, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 243 – Network Applications

The course provides a broad introduction to computer networks and a basic understanding of network application programming, with an emphasis on the working principles and application of computer networks. It covers a range of topics including basic data communication and computer network concepts, protocols, networked computing concepts and principles, network applications development and network security. The course features an interactive laboratory component with projects examining modern networking technologies such as, GPS enabled mobile phone applications, multimedia and distributed applications. The course assumes some familiarity with C programming.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103, NWEN 241

2/3 • CRN 19863 • Mon, Tue, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 221 – Software Development

This course develops a deeper understanding of object- oriented programming and associated practices. The focus is on programming techniques at the micro scale. Topics include: inheritance, polymorphism, genericity, error handling, testing and debugging. A sequence of short assignments will develop the key ideas and practices; rigour in testing will be developed through (automated) assessment of programme correctness.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18318 • Tue, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 225 – Software Design

This course develops a strong understanding of object-oriented design. Students will study modelling and programming techniques that support the analysis, design and development of large and maintainable programs. Students will work together in groups on an engineering problem and use a variety of best practices (e.g. Design Patterns) and notations (e.g. UML). Students will use specialized tools to apply these techniques in practical work.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 221; (X) SWEN 222

2/3 • CRN 30043 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

COMP 304 – Programming Languages

This course addresses the principles of programming language design and use. It introduces different models of computation and the programming languages based on them, particularly functional programming and logic programming. It then examines a range of underlying issues in programming languages, such as semantics of programming languages, type systems, and control in programming languages.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261

1/3 • CRN 964 • Mon, Wed, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

COMP 307 – Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

This course addresses key ideas and techniques of artificial intelligence (AI). It provides a brief introduction to the history of AI and fundamental search techniques, as well as introducing important machine learning topics and algorithms with their applications, including neural networks, and addresses a selection of other important topics in AI.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221; ENGR 123 or MATH 151 or 161; (X) COMP 420

1/3 • CRN 968 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

COMP 309 – Machine Learning Tools and Techniques

This course explores a range of machine learning tools and techniques for analysing data and automatically generating applications. The course will address tools for classification, regression, clustering and text mining, and techniques for preprocessing data and analysing the results of machine learning tools. Students will gain practical experience in applying a range of tools to a range of different data sets from different domains.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or (DATA 201 and DATA 202) or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221

2/3 • CRN 30098 • Mon, Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

COMP 312 – Simulation and Stochastic Models

Simulation and modelling of stochastic systems, covering examples from Operations Research and Computer Science, including queues, networks and computer systems. Design, analysis and validation of simulation experiments. Previous experience with computer programming is required before starting this course.

15 pts • (P) one course from (COMP 102, 112, 132, DATA 202); one course from (ENGR 123, MATH 177, 277, STAT 292), 15 further 200-level COMP, DATA, MATH, NWEN, STAT or SWEN pts; (X) OPRE 354. (D) DATA 304

1/3 • CRN 10444 • Tue, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

COMP 313 – Computer Game Development

The course will investigate tools, techniques and concepts for building interactive computer games, including software engineering techniques, HCI principles, AI methods and design strategies. The course will be co-taught with Media Design and will involve a substantial group project consisting of students from both disciplines.

15 pts • (P) 30 pts from (COMP 261, NWEN 241, 243, SWEN 222, 225)

2/3 • CRN 25049 • ^ Wed 7-9pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

COMP 361 – Design and Analysis of Algorithms

This course examines techniques for developing correct and efficient algorithms for some important classes of problems in Computer Science. It explores methods for designing algorithms, including greedy algorithms, divide and conquer, dynamic programming and graph algorithms. It covers techniques for demonstrating the correctness of algorithms and for analysing their efficiency.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261

1/3 • CRN 26060 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

CYBR 371 – System and Network Security

This course addresses key concepts, techniques and tools needed to provide security in computer and communications systems. Topics include the need for security, system and network security threats such as malware or denial-of-service attacks, secure systems design, identity management, authentication, access control, and computer network defence. Practical work will involve developing operating system and network security tools such as keyloggers as well as choosing and implementing appropriate security controls to meet a small organisation's network security needs. The examination will be related to the lecture material and learning during the assignments.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, NWEN 241, 243

1/3 • CRN 32072 • Tue, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 372 – Applications of Cryptography

Cryptographic mechanisms are widely deployed for communication and data protection. This course addresses how cryptographic mechanisms can be effectively used within larger security systems and how cryptographic mechanisms can be vulnerable in deployed systems. Topics covered include cryptographic primitives, cryptographic protocols, cryptanalytic techniques on primitives and protocols in deployed systems and attacks based upon common errors in use of libraries. Practical work will include best practice use of cryptographic libraries and attacks.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171; CYBR 271 or COMP 261; NWEN 243

2/3 • CRN 32078 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 373 – Human and Organisational Security

This course addresses how the behaviour and values of people as individuals or within an organisation affects cyber security threats and mitigation strategies. Topics include social engineering, cultural considerations, the insider threat, security usability, and risk management.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 371

2/3 • CRN 32079 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 301 – Operating Systems Design

This course addresses the design and implementation of operating sytems, and examines fundamental concepts such as resource management, concurrency, protection and security. Examples drawn from a range of modern operating systems illustrate these concepts and project work provides practical experience in the design and implementation of operating systems.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 342 (or 242)

2/3 • CRN 17180 • Tue, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 302 – Computer Network Design

This course addresses the principles, architectures and protocols that have shaped the development of the Internet and modern networked applications. It examines network design principles, underlying protocols, technologies and architectures of the TCP/IP protocol stack. Topics include the design of transport protocols, routing protocols, logical link control, medium access control and physical media.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 243; ENGR 123 or (MATH 161, one of MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 17181 • Tue, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

NWEN 303 – Concurrent Programming

This course examines a range of techniques for programming multi-threaded and distributed applications. Topics include synchronisation mechanisms used for programs that communicate via shared memory and message passing techniques for programs that communicate across a network. Practical work involves implementing programs using these techniques in a modern concurrent language, such as Java.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 123 or MATH 161; SWEN 221; 15 points from (COMP 261, CYBR 271, NWEN 241, 243)

1/3 • CRN 17182 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

NWEN 304 – Advanced Network Applications

This course introduces technologies, algorithms and systems for developing secure, scalable and reliable web server applications. Specific emphasis will be placed on application development middleware, computer security, network protocols and distributed systems. Particularly a variety of topics ranging from fundamental to advanced technologies for developing RESTful web applications, including MVC, distributed authentication and authorization, secure data communication, web caching and content replication, will be covered in lectures.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 123 or MATH 161, NWEN 243; COMP 261 or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221

2/3 • CRN 19864 • Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

NWEN 342 – Computer Organisation

The course develops an understanding of the structure of computers and how they execute programs. The course introduces the fundamentals of assembly language programming, data representation and computer arithmetic. It then develops an understanding of microprocessor architecture at the hardware level. Topics include digital electronics, arithmetic and logic unit (ALU), data paths, pipelining, memory hierarchy, I/O and motivating examples of computer systems. NB: this course runs for the first time in 2019.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, ENGR 123 or MATH 161 (X) NWEN 242

Not offered in 2020

SWEN 301 – Structured Methods

This course introduces the processes, practices, and tools required to engineer medium to large software systems. Topics include software craft, architecture, design, implementation, testing, maintenance, quality assurance, configuration management, and open source development. Practical work will use integrated development environments, automation, and domain specific languages.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 225 (or both 222 and 223)

1/3 • CRN 17183 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 303 – User Interface Design

This course addresses the design and engineering of user interfaces. It presents principles and guidelines for design and covers a range of design processes. It presents techniques for testing user interfaces, and considers a variety of user interface styles and interface devices.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 221

1/3 • CRN 17185 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 11-12 [Kelburn]

SWEN 304 – Database System Engineering

The course addresses fundamental principles underlying databases and database management systems. It covers the structure and principles of the relational data model, including SQL, and the principled design of the relational database schema. It also addresses issues in database transaction procession, concurrency control, recovery, and the complexity of query processing.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 221; ENGR 123 or MATH 161

1/3 • CRN 17186 • Mon, Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 324 – Software Correctness

This course is concerned with the development of correct software, especially the use of formal requirements and specifications to develop high-integrity software. This has applications in several areas, such as safety-critical systems (e.g. commercial airliners, space systems, etc) and high-performance concurrent systems. The course will examine a range of principles and techniques which underpin a rigorous approach to the specification and implementation of software. A sequence of assignments and labs will see a range of tools being used to specify small software systems, and to check that they meet their requirements. NB: this course is first running in 2019.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103; ENGR 123 or MATH 161; 30 200-level COMP/NWEN/SWEN points; (X) SWEN 224

2/3 • CRN 30044 • Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 325 – Software Development for Mobile Platforms

This course addresses the concepts, techniques, and tools required for developing applications within software frameworks for mobile platforms. Topics include the concepts and principles underlying software frameworks, the design and implementation of client-server applications, principles of user experience design for frameworks, the design and implementation of client-server applications, principles of user experience design for mobile applications, and key concepts in reliability, privacy, security and safety critical systems. Practical work will involve the design, implementation and testing of a range of mobile applications.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 243, SWEN 225 (or 222)

2/3 • CRN 30041 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 326 – Safety-Critical Systems

This course addresses the concepts, techniques and tools required for developing computer systems that are applicable where safety and reliability is paramount. Topics include the concepts and principles underlying safety critical systems, design and implementation techniques for ensuring correctness, reliability, privacy, security, dependability, survivability, and safe failure. Practical work will involve the design, implementation, and analysis of simple safety critical applications, with examples taken from mobile, web, and embedded systems deployed in healthcare, robotics, and autonomous vehicles.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, SWEN 225 (or 222)

1/3 • CRN 30042 • Mon, Wed, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

COMP 420 – Artificial Intelligence

This course addresses concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence (AI). It provides a brief overview of AI history and search techniques, as well as covering important machine learning topics and algorithms with their applications, including neural networks and evolutionary algorithms. Other topics include probability and Bayesian networks, planning and scheduling. The course will also consider a selection of other current topics in AI.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level COMP, SWEN or NWEN pts; (X) COMP 307

1/3 • CRN 32151 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

COMP 440 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 15202 • [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27190 • [Kelburn]

COMP 441 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 15203 • [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 23169 • [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 29145 [Kelburn]

Creative Arts & Communication (Study Abroad)

ARTH 113 – Thinking through Art

This course introduces the field of art history through the study of key works of art. Each lecture considers how the meaning of a particular artwork changes over time. Students will be introduced to stylistic, iconographic and contextual analysis, and gain insight into central debates in the discipline.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 9919 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ARTH 114 – Art and Encounter

This course approaches art history from a global perspective to look at key episodes of cross-cultural encounter from the Renaissance to the present. Each lecture focuses on specific art works to explore the process of interaction and exchange between cultures and its role in the construction of cultural identity.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 27020 • Tue, Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn]

DSDN 132 – Animation and Visual Effects I / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Atataunaki I

This course introduces students to the practice of digital asset creation and animation for narrative media. Students will develop basic skill sets central to animation and visual effects production, including polygonal modelling, surface shading, texturing, lighting, and animation using 3D digital content creation software. Practical skills are complemented with design principles and technical concepts related to this studio practice.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

1/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 30003 • ^ tba [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding I / Waehere ā-Auaha I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon, Thu 8.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Mon, Thu 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 17155 • ^ tba [Distance (NZ)]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 144 – Photographics / Ngā Whakaahuatanga

This course is an introduction to the photographic design principles, theories and methodologies. Through the completion of three projects, students will acquire a fundamental understanding of digital photography techniques.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17128 • ^ Tue 12.30-2pm [Te Aro], Tue 2-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 2.30-4pm [Te Aro], Thu 4-5.30pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 17156 • ^ Tue 3-4.30pm [Te Aro], Tue 4.30-6pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5pm [Te Aro], Thu 5-6.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 17157 • ^ tba [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design / Hoahoa ā-Whakairoiro

This course explores the basics of graphic design through a hands-on visual identity project. Students will learn about logos, typography, colour palettes, style guides, and more. It provides a good introduction to Communication Design skills. Students will learn about professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of materials that express the visual identity and voice of a brand.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30061 • Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

FILM 101 – Introduction to Film Analysis

This course examines how cinema creates meaning through formal elements such as narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound and editing. It introduces students to key concepts and terms in Film Studies. It develops their textual analysis skills and explores different practices of interpretation.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 9914 • Mon 3-6pm [Kelburn], Tue 12-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

FILM 102 – Film Movements and Contexts

This course involves a critical exploration of several important stages in the history of cinema. These periods will be examined within a range of artistic, cultural, historical, material and/or theoretical contexts.

20 pts • (X) FILM 231

2/3 • CRN 26086 • Mon 12-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-3pm [Kelburn]

MDIA 102 – Media, Society and Politics

This course examines relationships between media, society and politics in an era of technological change. Topics include the evolution of mass-media, the concentration of media ownership, the role of public media, digital media industries, news media and politics, and media effects.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 9181 • Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

MDIA 103 – Popular Media Culture

This course is an introduction to the study of popular media culture, with reference to the relationship between cultural theory and selected popular media forms. The course centres on critically examining the production and consumption of popular media culture. Particular attention is paid to issues relating to the social function and value of popular media culture.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 10432 • Thu 12-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

MUSC 105 – Music Now: Understanding Music Through the Lens of the 20th-21st Centuries

A study of the range of musical experiences that define contemporary musical consciousness, from development in art, popular, and world musics across the 20th and 21st centuries, to the changing role of performers and performance. Historical, critical and ethnographic approaches will be introduced.

20 pts • (X) MUSC 106

1/3 • CRN 15568 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 9-11 [Kelburn]

MUSC 150 – Music in Global Contexts

An introduction to music in world cultures. A survey of examples from the Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Americas that examines music within its cultural context, and an introduction to the study of ethnomusicology.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 15610 • [Distance (NZ)]

PERF 151 – Māori Music Performance

Introductory performance study of Māori music and its cultural contexts.

15 pts • (X) MUSC151

Not offered in 2020

THEA 101 – The Live Act: Introduction to Theatre

This course examines the phenomenon of live performance across cultures and time periods, from the opera house to the black box to the street. Topics include: Shakespeare, Indigenous and Asian Performance, realism, dance, puppetry, musicals, digital performance and performance art.  Plays and performances will be explored dramaturgically and practically in tutorials.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 11150 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

THEA 113 – Playing for Real (Acting and Performance Skills)

This course introduces key performance skills which provide foundations for various acting methods, and transfer to other contexts, such as public-speaking. Skills developed include: vocal technique, text analysis and delivery, openness to fellow players and ensemble, working an audience, impulse and improvisation, working with props, costumes and staging configurations.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 27041 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 212 – History of Photography

This course aims to survey the history of photography as it develops within a number of specific thematics, from the advent of the medium in the late eighteenth century through to the present. Accordingly, it will look at photography as a cultural phenomenon as much as an art form.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts; (X) ARTH 319 before 2015

Not offered in 2020

ARTH 219 – Modernism and Modernity

This course covers the major tendencies in modern European art from 1890 to 1950. It considers the emergence of major art movements like fauvism, cubism, futurism, and surrealism as a response to the changes in European society and the development of new visual vocabularies to describe modern experience.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ARTH pts

1/3 • CRN 7029 • Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CMPO 286 – Studio Recording and Production

Development of skills and exploration of concepts in music technology, with a focus on key approaches to studio recording, mixing and audio production, as well as developing critical perspectives on music technology.

15 pts • (P) CMPO 181 or 186; (X) CMPO 283

2/3 • CRN 30152 • Wed 9-12 [Kelburn]

COMD 211 – Drawing II / Tuhi Pikitia II

This course will allow students to practice traditional and contemporary approaches to both observational and imaginative drawing. In addition to building on skills and techniques developed in DSDN 152 Drawing I, students will be encouraged to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 152 and 15 further points from the BDI or BAS Schedules

1/3 • CRN 30073 • Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 251 – Design Psychology

Students will address how designs affect our cognitive system. It will discuss state of the art theories and approaches for designing with affective states, behaviour, expectations and desires in mind. There will be a strong aesthetic and creative goal in mind through research and design projects.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 111

Not offered in 2020

FILM 202 – Cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand

This course focuses on the cinema and visual culture of Aotearoa New Zealand from different cultural, aesthetic, historical, industrial and economic perspectives.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 237

Not offered in 2020

FILM 205 – Film Genre

This course will examine one or more film genres from an aesthetic, historical, cultural, and/or economic perspective.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 338

1/3 • CRN 26090 • Mon 1-4pm [Kelburn], Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

MDIA 202 – Multiplatform Television

This course examines TV industries and genres in today's digital and transnational contexts. Through the analysis of indicative platforms, providers, and programmes - examples drawn from the United States, United Kingdom and New Zealand - MDIA 202 examines the key characteristics of television in the multiplatform era.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level MDIA pts

Not offered in 2020

MDIA 203 – Visual Culture

This course is concerned both with visual artifacts and with vision as a social and cultural process. Thus, it considers the relationship between different visual regimes, or ways of seeing, and visual technologies, texts, and genres. It is also concerned with the historically specific understandings of what it means to see and be seen that make the visual world and our experiences in it intelligible.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level MDIA pts

Not offered in 2020

MDIA 205 – Popular Music Studies

A critical introduction to the study of popular music, with an emphasis on post-1950s rock and pop music and related genres. Topics covered include the international and New Zealand music industry; music audiences, scenes, subcultures, and fans; new technologies and new media; as well as cultural and identity politics.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from (MDIA 100-109, MUSC 105-150)

1/3 • CRN 10433 • Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

PASI 202 – Globalisation and Popular Culture in the Pacific

Why do popular cultures matter? How might they be important for learning about Pacific places and peoples in an era of globalisation? In this course, students examine popular cultures as dynamic sites for Pacific engagements with processes of globalisation.

20 pts • (P) PASI 101 and 20 approved pts

1/3 • CRN 10427 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

THEA 211 – From Whare Tapere to the Globe: Theatre of Aotearoa/New Zealand

A study of the diverse theatrical practices of theatre in Aotearoa New Zealand from the pre-colonial era to the present. There will be a core focus on how on how cultural identities have been formed and expressed through performance and playwriting. The course focuses on work from tangata whenua, diasporic and settler cultures across a variety of genres; from realist to devised, dance drama and street theatre.

20 pts • (P) 20 THEA pts or 40 pts from Part A of the BA schedule; (X) THEA 321

1/3 • CRN 27042 • Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ARTH 336 – Topics in Pacific Art

Examines the art and visual culture of the Pacific from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Topics include decolonisation and cultural revival, art and nationhood, Indigenous modernisms and contemporary Pacific art in the global art world.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level ARTH pts

1/3 • CRN 27022 • Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

FILM 302 – Cinema and Representation

This course examines how cinema represents issues such gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality and/or class in a critical manner. Topics will vary. In 2019 the course will focus on feminist, queer and transgender film criticism and cinemas. The course will introduce theories of representation and spectatorship central to feminist, queer and transgender film studies, survey their applications to a diverse set of films, and examine provocative depictions of sexuality, identity and society onscreen.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts or 40 PASI pts; (X) FILM 336

Not offered in 2020

FILM 304 – Film Cultures B

This course is an advanced study of a film culture or linked film cultures that are fostered through shared production, distribution and exhibition practices and that emerge from particular cultural or subcultural contexts. It explores the relationship of film and culture across national/transnational or cross-cultural frames.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 233, 333 in 2011-13

1/3 • CRN 26096 • Mon 10-1pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn]

FILM 306 – The Art of Film

This course examines the artistic dimensions of cinema at an advanced level. It may focus on specific film styles, aspects of the medium, individual directors, avant-garde and experimental cinema, or historical trends. In 2018 the course will examine Film Studies debates about post-classical Hollywood cinema. it will consider topics such as intensified continuity, complex narratives, and stylistic excess alongside key filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, Michael Mann, Kathryn Bigelow and Tony Scott.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 238

Not offered in 2020

MDIA 301 – Media Theory and Cultural Production

This course focuses on the relationship between critical social theory and the impact of the media on the production of culture.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from MDIA 200-299

1/3 • CRN 9567 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

MDIA 304 – News Media and the Cultural Industries

This course initially introduces students to the history, theories, genres, and culture of news media; thereafter, it considers contemporary news texts and practices in terms of the contexts of globalisation, changes to the cultural field of journalism/media, and the advent of digital technologies.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from MDIA 200–299

2/3 • CRN 9917 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

MDIA 306 – Media, Gender and Sexuality

This course examines the representations, contexts, and politics of gender, sexuality and the media. By interrogating the discourses of gender and sexuality as they are 'mediated' in a variety of forms (including television, film, popular music, social media, advertising), we will examine the construction and disruption of categories of gender and sexual identity, and their intersection with other identity frameworks.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from MDIA 200–299

1/3 • CRN 10437 • Wed 3-5pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

MDIA 309 – Mobile and Ubiquitous Media

This course examines the definition, development, and normalisation of ubiquitous media. Students will trace the genealogy of ubiquitous media by examining the emergence of the network society, the development of social media, mobile media and apps, and the pervasiveness of big data and algorithms. They will then critically examine the relationship between ubiquitous media and a range of sociocultural issues including identity, space/place, digital labour, and commercialisation.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from MDIA 200–299

Not offered in 2020

MUSC 351 – Studies in Music and Dance of Oceania

Study of select cultures from Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia and in-depth consideration of music and dance practices from a range of historical, ethnographic, or critical frameworks.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level pts from MUSC, PASI, or MAOR (X) MUSC 251

2/3 • CRN 15663 • Tue 10-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

THEA 321 – Special Topic: From Whare Tapere to the Globe: Theatre of Aotearoa/New Zealand

A study of the diverse theatrical practices of theatre in Aotearoa New Zealand from the pre-colonial era to the present. There will be a core focus on how cultural identities have been formed and expressed through performance and playwriting. The course focuses on work from tangata whenua, diasporic and settler cultures across a variety of genres; from realist to devised, dance drama and street theatre.

20 pts • (P) 20 THEA pts or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) THEA 211

1/3 • CRN 9153 • Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

studio tba

Creative Writing

See also Writing (Academic and Professional)

ENGL 172 – Reading and Writing Poetry

An introduction to between 50 and 100 poems by poets ranging from Shakespeare to Anne Carson. Students will also be introduced to some of the best critical readings on individual poems, and selected essays by leading poetry critics. Finally, students will learn the basic skills needed to write good poetry. The course will teach skills in both critical and creative writing.

20 pts • (X) FHSS 101 2016-2018

2/3 • CRN 32024 • (L1) Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 32222 • (L2) Mon, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

FHSS 103 – Great Ideas

Great Ideas is a course reflecting on some of the most exciting, important and revolutionary ideas that have shaped society and culture as it is today. It also considers how those ideas have an ongoing influence. It’s an interdisciplinary course looking at topics across the humanities, arts and social sciences.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 29009 • tba [Distance (NZ)]

3/3 • CRN 29011 • tba [Distance (NZ)]

CREW 253 – Poetry Workshop - He Rotarota

A workshop course in writing poetry which also involves wide reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

2/3 • CRN 9493 • ^ Thu 3-6pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 254 – Short Fiction Workshop - He Kōrero Paki

A workshop course in writing short fiction which also involves wide reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9495 • ^ Mon 2-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 9496 • ^ Fri 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 255 – Writing for the Young- He Tuhinga mā ngā Tamariki

A workshop course in writing for children which also involves wide reading of children's literature.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9497 • ^ Fri 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 257 – Creative Nonfiction Workshop- He Kōrero Pono

A workshop course in writing creative nonfiction (e.g. memoirs, travel writing) which also involves representative reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

2/3 • CRN 9499 • ^ Mon 4-7pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 258 – Iowa Prose Workshop - He Tuhinga no Tawahi

A topic in creative writing. Course materials will be an additional cost.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts, and an appropriate standard in written composition.

3/3 • CRN 17403 • ^ Tue, Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 259 – Iowa Poetry Workshop - He Rotarota nō Tāwāhi

A topic in creative writing. Course materials will be an additional cost.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts, and an appropriate standard in written composition.

3/3 • CRN 17404 • ^ Tue, Thu 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 260 – Māori and Pasifika Creative Writing Workshop- Te Hiringa a Tuhi

This creative writing workshop is a practical paper for students who wish to produce fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry or scriptwriting which is informed by Māori or Pasifika perspectives, cultures and origins, the process of colonisation, or questions of identity and belonging. However, this is not a prescriptive list, and students are free to write creatively in ways that do not directly address these subjects. The writing workshop will form the heart of this course, with students also reading and discussing Māori, Pasifika and other writers of colour.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 200-level and approval of the Programme Director (X) CREW 256 (2014-2018)

2/3 • CRN 31060 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 350 – Special Topic: World-Building Workshop

An advanced and innovative workshop for writers interested in long-form narrative (especially speculative fiction). Students will collaboratively develop a single story while working individually on the different components of successful world-building, including characterisation, structure, point-of-view, dialogue and pace. The course is aimed at novelists as well as writers for film and television. The workshop will encourage them to become skilled readers of classic world-building texts as well as knowing, confident and daring storytellers alert to the clichés and strictures of genre while responsive to its energy. There will be weekly written exercises which students will present in class for feedback.

20 pts • (P) 40 Points at 200 level and an appropriate standard in written composition

1/3 • CRN 29031 • ^ Fri 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 351 – Writing for Television Workshop - He Tuhinga mō te Pouaka Whakaata

A workshop course in writing television drama - including sketch comedy, sitcom, soap and series drama.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9500 • ^ Thu 4-7pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 352 – Science Writing Workshop - He Tuhinga Pūtaiao

An advanced creative writing workshop focusing on science subjects.

20 pts • (P) 60 points at 200 level and approval of the Programme Director

Not offered in 2020

CREW 353 – Writing for Theatre Workshop - He Tuhinga Whakaari

A workshop in the art and craft of writing scripts for live performance.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts at 200-level and permission of Programme Director

2/3 • CRN 26036 • ^ Wed 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 354 – Long-Form Fiction

This advanced creative writing workshop is a practical course for students who wish to produce long-form fiction (10,000+ word stories). Through the workshopping of each other’s fiction and the close reading of published literary texts, students will explore aspects of craft such as sustaining tension and integrating multiple storylines. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts at 200-level and approval of the Programme Director

1/3 • CRN 32039 • ^ Mon 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Criminology

CRIM 111 – Introduction to Criminology

CRIM 111 is a broad-based introduction to key criminological concepts, debates and theories. The first half explores a wide range of theoretical explanations for crime/criminality. The second explores the attempts to measure crime, media representations of crime and the social dimensions or correlates of crime including ethnicity, class, gender and age.

20 pts • (P) 20 ANTH, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PUBL, SOSC or SPOL pts or 15 PSYC pts; (X) CRIM 211, 214

2/3 • CRN 26079 • (L1) Mon, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27182 • (L2) Mon, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 202 – Crime in Aotearoa New Zealand

This course critically examines criminal offending in Aotearoa New Zealand. The course considers patterns of offending and victimization in relation to historical events, political ideologies and social relations, and highlights processes of criminalisation in the news media and on behalf of ‘moral entrepreneurs’. The course draws on case studies and guest speakers to illustrate key issues.

20 pts • (P) CRIM 111 (or 211 or 214); and one further course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SOSC or SPOL); (X) CRIM 212

1/3 • CRN 31047 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 203 – Criminal Justice in Aotearoa New Zealand

While providing an overview of the development and implementation of criminal justice, this course critically examines the significant social, political, economic and cultural contexts in which ‘justice’ is undertaken in Aotearoa New Zealand. The course explores how criminal justice measures are differentially experienced, and considers how justice could be done differently.

20 pts • (P) as for CRIM 202; (X) CRIM 212

2/3 • CRN 31048 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 204 – Current Issues in Criminology

The course will consider issues of current criminological concern, here in New Zealand and globally. Students will be encouraged to think about the full range of crimes and social harms associated with these issues. Human rights will be introduced as a way of thinking about harms perpetrated by the state. There will be a focus on applying theory and research. The course aims to develop students who know how to interpret and respond to real life events in ways that promote security and social justice.

20 pts • (P) as for CRIM 202; (X) CRIM 219 2017-2018

1/3 • CRN 31049 • Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 216 – Drugs, Risk and Play

This course will examine the place of drugs, both legal and illegal, in contemporary society through a critical exploration of the socially constructed boundaries between use and misuse. The course will also critically interrogate the use of drugs in a recreational setting, focusing on the socially constructed boundaries between recreational and 'problem' drug use, as well as the separation between licit and illicit use.

20 pts • (P) as for CRIM 202

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 217 – Criminal Psychology

CRIM 217 provides an introduction to psychological approaches to understanding and preventing criminal behaviour. Topics covered include violent offending sexual offending, collective violence, drug use, crime prevention, and rehabilitation.

20 pts • (P) as for CRIM 202

2/3 • CRN 25011 • Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

CRIM 218 – Discrimination and Criminal Justice

Students will critically examine the nature and extent of discrimination experienced by particular groups in the criminal justice system with particular focus on indigenous people, minority ethnic groups, women and Muslims. Key concepts explored include: power; prejudice; discrimination, non-discrimination and anti-discrimination; social construction; othering; 'race'; labelling; prejudice and stereotyping.

20 pts • (P) as for CRIM 202

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 303 – Special Topic: Prisons in Aotearoa New Zealand

This course examines issues of state punishment and incarceration in Aotearoa New Zealand. A central focus is the record growth in the country’s prison population over the last four decades. These changes are viewed in relation to broader social issues of colonialism and post-colonialism, shifting public values and morality, and contemporary patterns of inequality. Alternatives to incarceration are evaluated and explored.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL.

2/3 • CRN 28181 • Mon 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 311 – Policing

A critical examination of policing in modern society. Topics will include the history of the police and policing, the evolution of policing methods and strategies, police culture and discretion, issues of gender and ethnicity, and police accountability.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL) (X) CRIM 215, LAWS 309

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 312 – Punishment and Modern Society

The historical development of modern punishment, with particular reference to New Zealand, and its relationship to broader social and political change.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 313 – Women, Crime and Social Control

The study of women's involvement and experiences within the criminal justice system and its social control implications. Topics include women as offenders, women as victims, and women as criminal justice professionals.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 314 – Special Topic: Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is the trade of human beings, most commonly for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation or forced labour. This course explores the various forms of human trafficking, its causes, characteristics and consequences as well as the physical, psychological and emotional harm experienced by victims of human trafficking. Topics covered will include sex trafficking, mail-order brides, labour trafficking, organ removal, forced begging, and other forms of trafficking. The course will also explore and evaluate the role of the state and non-governmental organisations in addressing trafficking problems.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

1/3 • CRN 9345 • (L1) Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 32228 • (L2) Thu 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

CRIM 315 – White-Collar Crime

This course will examine white-collar crime, using case study examples to look at well-known case studies of individual white-collar crimes, corporate crimes, and political crimes. Understanding these 'crimes of the powerful' is a key part of contemporary criminology. We will consider the main explanations of the causes of white-collar crimes, and discuss the merits of various methods of policing, regulating and punishing powerful offenders. The limits of criminology and the criminal law as policy tools for controlling elite deviance will be critically evaluated.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC, SPOL) (X) CRIM 314 (2016-19)

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 316 – Criminological Theory

A study of various theories of crime causation and their implications for understanding criminal behaviour.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

2/3 • CRN 6016 • Wed 4-6pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CRIM 322 – Crime, Deviance and Popular Culture

This course examines the relationship between popular cultural, criminal, and deviant practices. In addition to studying examples of the criminalisation of cultural practices, students will focus on how far popular cultural representations of crime and deviance reflect the 'reality' of crime and deviance in contemporary society. Popular cultural representations of crime and deviance as a mirror reflecting societal attitudes and stereotypes of race, masculinity and femininity in relation to crime and deviance will be examined. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of research which has attempted to examine and explain the ways in which cultural, criminal and deviant practices may come together.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 323 – State Crime

This course examines theoretical, social, political, and legal perspectives on state crime. Through case-study material, state crime is shown to be diverse, destructive and, often, hidden. The course evaluates how state officials join with other actors to commit crimes, and analyses the range of response to these events.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 324 – Sexual Violence

This course is designed to introduce students to the issues and concepts central to an understanding of sexual violence. The focus of the course is on the study of adult rape/sexual assault and child sexual abuse. The course explores the causes, characteristics and consequences of sexual violence, examining issues for both the victims and offenders of these crimes. Topics covered may include theories of sexual offending, criminal justice system responses, victim impacts and survival, rape prevention, and offender treatment programmes.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

1/3 • CRN 18023 • (L1) ^ Thu 10-12 [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 30198 • (L2) Wed 10-12 [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CRIM 325 – Drugs, Risk and Play

This course will examine the place of drugs, both legal and illegal, in contemporary society through a critical exploration of the socially constructed boundaries between use and misuse. The course will also critically interrogate the use of drugs in a recreational setting, focusing on the socially constructed boundaries between recreational and 'problem' drug use, as well as the separation between licit and illicit use.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL); (X) CRIM 216

2/3 • CRN 25009 • Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

CRIM 326 – Criminological Research Methods

CRIM 326 will provide an introduction to research methods in criminology. The course will present different approaches to studying crime and explore the important ethical issues in doing criminological research. Note: this course is strongly recommended for students wishing to progress to Honours level study.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

1/3 • CRN 25010 • Mon 9-11 [Kelburn]

CRIM 327 – Biosocial criminology

This course provides an introduction to the biosocial approach in criminology. The role of evolution, genetics and neurobiology in understanding criminal behaviour will be examined and implications for the criminal justice system will be explored. A key focus will be on how biological factors can be integrated with social and cultural factors to provide a more complete understanding of key findings in criminology. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the implications of a biosocial approach for crime prevention, offender rehabilitation, and criminal responsibility.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

Not offered in 2020

Cultural Anthropology

ANTH 101 – Foundations of Society and Culture

This course introduces students to the subject by focusing on how anthropologists understand and explain social and cultural differences. We will explore a range of contemporary topics through a set of key questions that form the foundation of the discipline and are essential to both further study in Anthropology and an appreciation of world cultures.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 266 • Mon, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 102 – Social and Cultural Diversity

This course introduces students to the study of social and cultural diversity by exploring culture and its role in our lives. Topics include ritual, symbolism, the body, exchange, belief, inequality, globalisation, kinship, gender and class. Case studies are drawn from New Zealand, the Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 267 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 201 – Gender, Sexuality and Kinship

This course examines anthropological approaches to kinship, sexuality and gender. It will explore the shifting social norms surrounding gender, sexuality, the family and relatedness across diverse cultural settings. It will reveal how practices of gender, sexuality and kinship intersect with new reproductive technologies, media, nationalism, capitalism, colonisation, class and race.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further points from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 30010 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 204 – Modern Anthropological Thought

This course explores inspiring and influential ideas in recent Anthropology by discussing the writings of some of the discipline's greatest thinkers. Among the topics considered are: symbolism and the interpretation of cultures; culture and globalisation; ethnography and morality; culture and history; culture and evolution; culture and power; culture and experience.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts; from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 271 • Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 208 – Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development

This course will examine the cultural encounters and human experiences that emerge out of contemporary human rights regimes, humanitarian interventions, development projects, and global politics. Taking case studies from a range of different cultural settings, it will focus on how culture and politics shapes these global practices, and how different groups understand, respond to and challenge these interventions.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

ANTH 209 – Conflict and Reconciliation

This course focuses on anthropological approaches to conflict and reconciliation, exploring the relationship between the two, and considering how we as anthropologists approach these topics at local, national, and international levels. These themes are addressed through material that examines societies in conflict, post-conflict peace-building, nationalism, and state building. The course will also examine theories of social suffering and studies that explore local interpretations of history, politics, violence, and power. A variety of ethnographies will be considered.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 274 • Mon, Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 210 – Environmental Anthropology

This course explores human relationships with ecological and material environments. It will examine diverse cultural perceptions of and approaches to the environment, the relationship between nature and culture, and anthropology’s contribution to contemporary ecological and climate debates.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

ANTH 213 – Ritual and Collective Life

How do communities give meaning and order to the world? What binds us together in collective relations with one another? This course offers an introduction to the anthropology of ritual. It will consider the ways rituals give order to social life, how they are used as public performances, how they generate political power, and how they are used to challenge established modes of living and being. The course examines a range of examples from New Zealand and beyond.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 13073 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 215 – Special Topic: Capitalism, Culture, and Inequality

This course introduces a variety of topics associated with economic anthropology by examining the various forms that capitalism takes within different cultural contexts, how it produces inequalities, and the varied ways that people and cultures respond to, appropriate and resist the economic systems of today's global world.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; X ANTH 315 (in 2017- 18)

1/3 • CRN 13112 • Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 301 – Science, Technology and Culture

Science and technology are fundamental parts of all cultures. In this course, we examine how diverse sciences and technologies shape peoples’ interpretations of the world, their relations with one another, and their understandings of themselves. Considering issues like the relationship between indigenous knowledges and science, robotics, social media, medicine and biotechnology, and climate and environment, we ask what science is, how technology functions, and what place science and technology have in our own lives and societies.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ANTH 314 in 2018-2019

1/3 • CRN 32069 • Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 307 – Medical Anthropology

This course explores what roles our cultural beliefs and practices play in shaping our understandings of health, wellbeing, illness and medicine. We ask how culture mediates our experiences of our bodies, our emotions and diseases, and how local and global inequalities affect health outcome. The course takes a comparative approach, asking students to consider cultural approaches to disease categories, illness experiences, and systems of healing in their own societies and communities as well as in a range of globally diverse settings.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299; (X) ANTH 315 (2011-2014)

2/3 • CRN 27015 • Tue 12-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 308 – Anthropology in Oceania

The major theme running through this course will be deep engagements between indigenous cultural orders and western political, economic and religious systems. Most of the ethnographic examples will be from the South Pacific but we will also explore more generally relationships between globalisation and localisation. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299

Not offered in 2020

ANTH 312 – The Challenges of Ethnography

This course will explore how anthropologists carry out research, the challenges of conducting ethnographic research, and the kinds of knowledge ethnography allows us to build. It will consider the ethics and politics of researching people’s lives and representing their communities. It will also reveal how anthropologists and their research partners work collaboratively in the production of knowledge, and how is this knowledge applied in communities, workplaces and governments. This course will take a practice-based approach to learning, and will also explore case studies from New Zealand and beyond.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

Not offered in 2020

ANTH 314 – Special Topic: Social Lives of Buildings

Buildings participate in the creation, reproduction and transformation of social relations; like people, our buildings have social lives. Buildings are forms of technology, but they are also deeply meaningful constructions which shape us as we shape them. This course adopts a broad comparative view of the ways that a wide range of buildings – from tents to castles, tree-houses to retirement villages – participate in the making of social lives.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299

1/3 • CRN 6102 • Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

seminar tba

ANTH 315 – Special Topic: Anthropology for Liberation

How can Anthropology advance human emancipation from racism, gender inequality, class disparities, and other forms of oppression and exploitation? In this course we will consider what it means to approach anthropology from a decolonising perspective, and explore what an anthropology for liberation might look like in theory and practice, drawing on examples from Asia, Oceania, and Latin America.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299; X ANTH 215 in 2017

2/3 • CRN 6103 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 316 – Visual Anthropology

This course will consider the use of visual media in both the practice and production of ethnography by examining how visual representations are both products of cultural norms, values and actions and Considering the development of visual anthropology, this course will ask questions such as: what does seeing visual Anthropology, the analysis of scripts and picture mean? How are visual and other sensory media used to communicate? How do visual representations influence social relationships and actions? Can visual anthropology help produce a more publically accessible anthropology? This course may include visits to research institutes in Wellington.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

1/3 • CRN 13080 • Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 317 – Migration, Culture and Identity

In this course we explore migration as both empirical phenomenon and subject of anthropological study. We compare the intentions, outcomes and experiences of migrants, considering citizenship, belonging, and the nation-state, and look critically at recent models of transnationalism and diaspora which have challenged earlier ideas about migration and culture.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

Not offered in 2020

Cybersecurity

CYBR 171 – Cybersecurity Fundamentals

This course examines how cybersecurity affects individuals and society and aims to develop understanding that the concept of cybersecurity goes beyond technology to include people, information, and processes. It will examine key concepts as well as current issues and debates about how to respond to cybersecurity. Note that this course will involve using a range of security tools but does not involve programming. Students will also write short essays related to current debates around cybersecurity issues.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30039 • Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 271 – Secure Programming

This course addresses the concepts, techniques and tools required for developing software that reliably preserves the security properties of the information and systems they protect. The course covers common software vulnerabilities, specifying security requirements, secure design principles and techniques for evaluating software security. Practical work will involve developing and evaluating the security of C and Java programs. NB: this course will first run in 2019.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, NWEN 241

2/3 • CRN 30040 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

CYBR 371 – System and Network Security

This course addresses key concepts, techniques and tools needed to provide security in computer and communications systems. Topics include the need for security, system and network security threats such as malware or denial-of-service attacks, secure systems design, identity management, authentication, access control, and computer network defence. Practical work will involve developing operating system and network security tools such as keyloggers as well as choosing and implementing appropriate security controls to meet a small organisation's network security needs. The examination will be related to the lecture material and learning during the assignments.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, NWEN 241, 243

1/3 • CRN 32072 • Tue, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 372 – Applications of Cryptography

Cryptographic mechanisms are widely deployed for communication and data protection. This course addresses how cryptographic mechanisms can be effectively used within larger security systems and how cryptographic mechanisms can be vulnerable in deployed systems. Topics covered include cryptographic primitives, cryptographic protocols, cryptanalytic techniques on primitives and protocols in deployed systems and attacks based upon common errors in use of libraries. Practical work will include best practice use of cryptographic libraries and attacks.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171; CYBR 271 or COMP 261; NWEN 243

2/3 • CRN 32078 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 373 – Human and Organisational Security

This course addresses how the behaviour and values of people as individuals or within an organisation affects cyber security threats and mitigation strategies. Topics include social engineering, cultural considerations, the insider threat, security usability, and risk management.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 371

2/3 • CRN 32079 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn]

Data Science

DATA 101 – Introduction to Data Science

This course addresses the basics of working with data, including sources and types of data, wrangling and cleaning data, analysing and visualising data, assessing data quality, and communicating results derived from data. Issues of accuracy, privacy, legal and ethics in data collection, transmission, storage and use are introduced, including specific aspects of Maori data sovereignty relevant to data science.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 31056 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn]

DATA 201 – Techniques of Data Science

Computational techniques relevant to data science, including basic machine learning. Mathematical and statistical techniques underlying data generation, analysis and modelling. Privacy and ethical dimensions of data science.

15 pts • (P) DATA 101, one of (COMP 102, 112, 132, INFO 151), one of (ENGR 123, MATH 177, QUAN 102, STAT 193).

1/3 • CRN 31057 • Tue, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

DATA 202 – Data Management and Programming

An introduction to practical aspects of data management for those who work with data sources. Students will apply programming and data management techniques using a high-level language and SQL. Web scraping, data transformation, data cleaning, summary and visualisation.

15 pts • (P) One of (COMP 102, 112, 132, the pair (INFO 151, 226)); (X) SCIE 201 in 2017/18

2/3 • CRN 31058 • Mon, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn]

DATA 301 – Data Science in Practice

A capstone course in data science. The course will introduce interactive displays, infographics and dashboards, focussing on communication, reporting and visualisation. It will bring together techniques in statistical and mathematical modelling with programming as well as social and ethical perspectives on data science.

15 pts • (P) DATA 201, one of (DATA 202, SCIE 201 in 2017/8)

2/3 • CRN 32011 • Mon, Wed, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

DATA 303 – Statistics for Data Science

This course develops aspects of statistical modelling and inference underpinning data science, including binary, count and ordinal data. The role of data and modelling in decision making is examined in a variety of contexts.

15 pts • (P) DATA 202 (or SCIE 201 in 2017-18), one of (MATH 277, QUAN 203, STAT 292).

1/3 • CRN 32012 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

DATA 304 – Simulation and Stochastic Models

Simulation and modelling of stochastic systems, covering examples from Operations Research and Computer Science, including queues, networks and computer systems. Design, analysis and validation of simulation experiments. Previous experience with computer programming is required before starting this course.

15 pts • (P) one course from (COMP 102, 112, 132, DATA 202); one course from (ENGR 123, MATH 177, 277, STAT 292); 15 further 200-level COMP, DATA, MATH, NWEN, STAT or SWEN pts; (X) OPRE 354. (D) COMP 312

1/3 • CRN 32013 • Tue, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

DATA 351 – Data Science Internship

Students will complete an approved and supervised project in a public, private or non-profit organisation with established data science work stream. It will enable students to gain professional work experience in the application of data science and to develop teamwork and communication skills in a relevant organisation.

15 pts • (P) DATA 201, one of (MATH 277, STAT 292), one of (DATA 202, QUAN 203, SCIE 201 in 2017/18), 15 further 200-level points all with B+ average

2/3 • CRN 32015 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

Data Science (Study Abroad)

COMP 112 – Introduction to Computer Science

This course introduces a range of important concepts and topics across Computer Science, Software Engineering and Network Engineering. Students will also gain a solid foundation of programming skills in object oriented programming. The course is an entry point to the BE(Hons) and BSc in Computer Science for students who already have basic programming skills.

15 pts • (P) 14 AS level 3 NCEA credits in Digital Technology including 6 credits in Computer Programming, or COMP 132, or equivalent programming experience (X) COMP 102

1/3 • CRN 26034 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

DATA 101 – Introduction to Data Science

This course addresses the basics of working with data, including sources and types of data, wrangling and cleaning data, analysing and visualising data, assessing data quality, and communicating results derived from data. Issues of accuracy, privacy, legal and ethics in data collection, transmission, storage and use are introduced, including specific aspects of Maori data sovereignty relevant to data science.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 31056 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 123 – Engineering Mathematics with Logic and Statistics

Mathematical techniques employed by network and software engineers, including methods of combinatorics, logic, probability and decision theory. The course emphasises engineering applications of these techniques.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 (X) the pair MATH 161, (MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193);

2/3 • CRN 27044 • Mon, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31159 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-2pm [Kelburn]

INFO 151 – Databases

This course introduces the principles of database definition, design, access and implementation. It shows how databases support modern data processing systems. Students will be able to create a data model from a business situation, implement a database from that data model and use query language such as SQL to access data.

15 pts • (X) INFO 241, 341

1/3 • CRN 27094 • Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 27095 • Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

MATH 151 – Algebra

An introduction to linear algebra, including matrices and vectors, systems of linear equations, complex numbers, eigenvectors, and algebraic structures.

15 pts • (P) 16 achievement standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics (or equivalent) or MATH 132

1/3 • CRN 17161 • Tue, Thu, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

MATH 161 – Discrete Mathematics and Logic

Logic underlies all of mathematics. In this course we will introduce the basic notions of logic, and discuss what makes some arguments good (or valid), while other arguments are invalid. This leads to a definition of a mathematical proof, particularly mathematical induction. Other topics include sets, relations, functions, elementary counting principles, properties of divisibility of the integers, and polynomials. The second half of the course introduces the fundamental concepts of graph theory, which is the study of networks.

15 pts • (P) Approved level of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Calculus or one of (ENGR 121-123, B+ or better in MATH 132, MATH 141-177, QUAN 111) or equivalent background in mathematics.

2/3 • CRN 17162 • Tue, Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

MATH 177 – Probability and Decision Modelling

An introduction to probability models in statistics, decision making and operations research including key concepts of probability, random variables and their distributions, decision theory and utility theory. Goodness of fit tests are used to check the validity of fitted models.

15 pts • (P) Approved level of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Calculus or one of (ENGR 122, 123, MATH 141, QUAN 111) or equivalent background in mathematics.

2/3 • CRN 19803 • Tue, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SARC 122 – Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Tikanga Nama

Basic applied algebra, physics and statistics relevant to the study of design and the built environment.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18168 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

STAT 193 – Statistics in Practice

An applied statistics course for students who will be advancing in other disciplines as well as those majoring in Statistics. It is particularly suitable for students majoring in Biological Science subjects, Geography, Linguistics, Health, Psychology and social sciences such as Education and is also suitable for students taking BCom subjects. Offered as 2 streams in the first trimester (CRNs 1791 & 11333) and the second trimester (CRNs 4442 & 6164). Offered in the third trimester (CRN 17069).

15 pts • (X) MATH 277, QUAN 102

1/3 • CRN 1791 • (L3) Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 11333 • (L4) Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 4442 • (L1) Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 6164 • (L2) Tue, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 17069 • Tue, Thu, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

BIOL 241 – Genetics

An introduction to the structure and behaviour of chromosomes, genes and DNA; and to the processes of heredity and the mechanisms by which genetic information is transmitted and expressed in animals (including humans), plants and micro-organisms. Introduction to population genetics and DNA technologies.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111 (X) BMSC 241

2/3 • CRN 9055 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

COMP 261 – Algorithms and Data Structures

This course covers a range of algorithms and data structures building on the fundamental structures and algorithms from COMP 103. The major areas covered are: graph algorithms, graphics algorithms and advanced data structures. This course takes a practical approach focusing on the implementation of a wide variety of algorithms.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103, ENGR 123 or MATH 161

1/3 • CRN 18314 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

DATA 201 – Techniques of Data Science

Computational techniques relevant to data science, including basic machine learning. Mathematical and statistical techniques underlying data generation, analysis and modelling. Privacy and ethical dimensions of data science.

15 pts • (P) DATA 101, one of (COMP 102, 112, 132, INFO 151), one of (ENGR 123, MATH 177, QUAN 102, STAT 193).

1/3 • CRN 31057 • Tue, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

DATA 202 – Data Management and Programming

An introduction to practical aspects of data management for those who work with data sources. Students will apply programming and data management techniques using a high-level language and SQL. Web scraping, data transformation, data cleaning, summary and visualisation.

15 pts • (P) One of (COMP 102, 112, 132, the pair (INFO 151, 226)); (X) SCIE 201 in 2017/18

2/3 • CRN 31058 • Mon, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 215 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Science

An introduction to the basic concepts of Geographic Information Systems and Science.

20 pts • (P) 60 100-level pts (X) GEOG 415

2/3 • CRN 6005 • Tue, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

INFO 264 – Business Analytics

Covers the techniques of collecting, organising and analysing historic data to improve business processes and predict customer behaviour. Uses analytical software for data mining, decision support, supply chain management, simulation, and optimisation.

15 pts • (P) INFO 151

2/3 • CRN 27100 • Tue, Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

LING 221 – Sociolinguistics

An introduction to sociolinguistics including the analysis of multilingualism, social dialects and attitudes to language.

20 pts • (P) LING 111 (or 211)

1/3 • CRN 7010 • Wed 11-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

MARK 203 – Market Research

Examines the key role of collecting, interpreting and analysing information to assist marketing managers in formulating marketing strategy. Market research methods and information technologies are covered in detail.

15 pts • (P) MARK 101, QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 18787 • Thu 8.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 509 • Fri 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

MATH 261 – Discrete Mathematics 2

Enumerative combinatorics (binomial coefficients, Stirling numbers, the inclusion-exclusion principle, generating functions, Burnside's Lemma) and algorithmic graph theory (shortest paths, matchings, flows).

15 pts • (P) MATH 161 or B+ or better in ENGR 123

1/3 • CRN 18326 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn]

MATH 277 – Mathematical Statistics

Topics will be chosen from: basic probability theory; introduction to random variables and expectation; joint distributions, correlation and linear combinations of random variables; introductory estimation and hypothesis testing; nonparametric methods; one-way analysis of variance; linear regression; goodness of fit tests and contingency tables. The statistical software R will be used.

15 pts • (P) (MATH 142, 177) or B+ or better in both (ENGR 122, 123)

1/3 • CRN 19804 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

MDIA 206 – Media and Digital Cultures

This course introduces some of the key arguments and issues discussed in the rapidly developing field of new media studies. We examine how digital technologies (such as the Internet, digital music, video games) are transforming contemporary culture and every day life, and in turn, how cultural, economic, and political forces shape these technologies.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level MDIA pts

2/3 • CRN 10434 • Wed 12-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

RELI 226 – Psychology of Religion

This course provides an introduction to the psychology of religion. Many people identify with religious groups or traditions and claim to have religious or spiritual experiences. This course explores how contemporary psychology research sheds light on human religiosity. Topics include: the development of religion in children, the relationship between religion and morality, rituals, altered states of consciousness, and religion and identity.

20 pts • (P) 20 RELI pts or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule or 30 PSYC pts; (X) RELI 310

3/3 • CRN 10402 • tba [Distance (NZ)]

tut tba

STAT 292 – Applied Statistics 2A

This course introduces several statistical methods appropriate for applications in the biological and social sciences. Topics include: non-parametric tests, design of experiments, one-way ANOVA and t-tests for difference of means, factorial experiments, simple linear regression, analysis of covariance, binomial and Poisson distributions, two-way contingency tables, models for binary response variables and log-linear models for two-way contingency tables. Examples are used for illustration throughout the course, using a statistical computer package. No previous experience with computers is required.

15 pts • (P) STAT 193 or one of (ENGR 123, QUAN 102) or a comparable background in Statistics.

1/3 • CRN 18331 • Tue, Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

COMP 307 – Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

This course addresses key ideas and techniques of artificial intelligence (AI). It provides a brief introduction to the history of AI and fundamental search techniques, as well as introducing important machine learning topics and algorithms with their applications, including neural networks, and addresses a selection of other important topics in AI.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221; ENGR 123 or MATH 151 or 161; (X) COMP 420

1/3 • CRN 968 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

COMP 309 – Machine Learning Tools and Techniques

This course explores a range of machine learning tools and techniques for analysing data and automatically generating applications. The course will address tools for classification, regression, clustering and text mining, and techniques for preprocessing data and analysing the results of machine learning tools. Students will gain practical experience in applying a range of tools to a range of different data sets from different domains.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or (DATA 201 and DATA 202) or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221

2/3 • CRN 30098 • Mon, Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

DATA 301 – Data Science in Practice

A capstone course in data science. The course will introduce interactive displays, infographics and dashboards, focussing on communication, reporting and visualisation. It will bring together techniques in statistical and mathematical modelling with programming as well as social and ethical perspectives on data science.

15 pts • (P) DATA 201, one of (DATA 202, SCIE 201 in 2017/8)

2/3 • CRN 32011 • Mon, Wed, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

DATA 303 – Statistics for Data Science

This course develops aspects of statistical modelling and inference underpinning data science, including binary, count and ordinal data. The role of data and modelling in decision making is examined in a variety of contexts.

15 pts • (P) DATA 202 (or SCIE 201 in 2017-18), one of (MATH 277, QUAN 203, STAT 292).

1/3 • CRN 32012 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

MARK 317 – Marketing Analytics

This course places the student in the role of the Marketing Manager, making decisions based on modern marketing analytics. Marketing problems are presented, along with analytical techniques, to gain an understanding of how data may contribute to strategic decision making in marketing.

15 pts • (P) MARK 201, 202, 203

2/3 • CRN 19755 • Tue 3.30-5.30pm [Pipitea]

MATH 353 – Optimisation

A course in the theory, algorithms and applications of optimisation, including the use of a computer package to formulate, solve and interpret optimisation problems.

15 pts • (P) MATH 243, 15 further 200-level MATH pts

1/3 • CRN 19903 • Mon, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn]

MGMT 316 – Decision Modelling for Managers

An examination of selected managerial problem structuring methodologies and analytic approaches to decision-making, emphasising an applied computer-oriented approach, and the development of decision-making, problem-solving and judgmental skills, particularly for situations involving risk and uncertainty.

15 pts • (P) MGMT 208 or (MGMT 206, QUAN 102)

2/3 • CRN 9538 • Tue 12.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

STAT 332 – Statistical Inference

This course covers distribution theory; estimation including minimum variance unbiased estimators and sufficiency; statistical inference and hypothesis testing. The topics of estimation and hypothesis testing met in MATH 277 will be looked at in greater depth. Optimal estimation procedures and tests will be developed.

15 pts • (P) MATH 243, MATH 277

2/3 • CRN 19809 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

STAT 335 – Statistical Models for Actuarial Science

This course introduces a range of models used in actuarial science, including Markov chains, Markov processes and transition, survival models and estimation with graduation methods and binomial models for mortality.

15 pts • (P) MATH 277

1/3 • CRN 27136 • Mon, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 11-12 [Kelburn]

STAT 391 – Mathematical Methods for Applied Statistics

This course covers key mathematical methods used in the construction and maximisation of likelihoods, analyses of experimental data and general linear models, and exploration of probability distributions. Topics will include differentiation and optimisation of functions, matrices and their properties, probability distributions and integration. The statistical software R will be used.

15 pts • (P) STAT 292; (X) MATH 243, the pair (ENGR 122/MATH 142, MATH 251)

1/3 • CRN 19810 • Mon, Wed, Thu 5-6pm [Kelburn]

STAT 393 – Linear Models

This course will cover general linear models: theory and applications, including maximum likelihood estimation, model selection, AIC, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, and residual diagnostics. It will also describe the theory of generalised linear models and give examples for binary and count data. The statistical software R will be used.

15 pts • (P) (MATH 243, MATH 277) or (STAT 293, 391)

2/3 • CRN 19811 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

STAT 394 – Multivariate Statistics

General concepts and various practical analysis techniques are introduced for multivariate data. Topics will be chosen from: principal component analysis, cluster analysis, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, canonical correlations, the multivariate general linear model and multidimensional scaling. Statistical software will be used to apply the techniques to multivariate data.

15 pts • (P) MATH 277 or (STAT 292, 391)

2/3 • CRN 19808 • Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

Deaf Studies

DEAF 801 – Deaf Culture and Society

This course examines characteristics of the Deaf community as a linguistic minority by identifying aspects of Deaf identity and Deaf culture.

20 pts

block dates/3 • CRN 7820 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9-5pm [Kelburn]

DEAF 802 – Introduction to Structure and Use of NZ Sign Language

This course includes an introduction to the phonology, morphology, syntax and use of NZ Sign Language, and its history and variation.

20 pts

block dates/3 • CRN 7821 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9-5pm [Kelburn]

DEAF 803 – Introduction to Learning Sign Language

This course introduces the nature of sign language acquisition by Deaf children and non-deaf adults, with reference to general research about second language learning processes and contexts.

20 pts

block dates/3 • CRN 7822 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9-5pm [Kelburn]

DEAF 804 – Principles of Teaching NZ Sign Language

The course includes a review of major principles of language teaching approaches, and introduces techniques for teaching sign languages.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

DEAF 805 – Curriculum Design and Materials Development

This course includes an introduction to the design, preparation and use of appropriate classroom teaching materials for learners of NZ Sign Language at different levels.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

DEAF 806 – Deaf Studies Teaching Practicum

The practicum includes classroom practice in teaching NZSL, with the expectation that students apply theoretical learning from previous courses to their teaching work. In addition to teaching, activities include keeping a journal for self-review and teacher observation.

20 pts

1+2/3 • CRN 7825 • ^ tba [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Design for Social Innovation

DSDN 101 – Design Visualisation / Pohewatanga ā-Hoahoa

Introduction to theories and practices of visual communication, investigated explicitly through various modes of visualisation across a wide range of media including web based media. Taught from an explicitly design perspective, emphases are given to expressive conceptual, contextual and formal modes.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17120 • ^ Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 104 – Object Codes: 3D Printing / Ngā Waehere ā-Mātāoroko: Tānga Ahu-Toru

This course engages 3D printing technologies to visualise and create 3D forms. Computer based studios explore leading edge 3D printing technologies and address the distinctive features of a 3D printing revolution.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17152 • ^ Thu 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 111 – Fundamental Principles of Design / Te Tūāpapa o te Hoahoa

This course is an introduction to generic design concepts, design vocabularies, and principles of design, taught in the studio environment using analogue and digital fabrication techniques. The design studio will develop inquiry, literacy and compositional skills in design such as video.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17123 • ^ Mon 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 112 – Interaction Design I / Hoahoa ā-Pāhekoheko I

In this course students analyse tangible and intangible interactions between people and things. Students are introduced to design concepts, vocabularies, basic coding, and practices of interaction design with an explicit focus on contextual and/or contemporary issues.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17124 • Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 132 – Animation and Visual Effects I / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Atataunaki I

This course introduces students to the practice of digital asset creation and animation for narrative media. Students will develop basic skill sets central to animation and visual effects production, including polygonal modelling, surface shading, texturing, lighting, and animation using 3D digital content creation software. Practical skills are complemented with design principles and technical concepts related to this studio practice.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

1/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 30003 • ^ tba [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 141 – Experimental Mediums / Ngā Huarahi Hei Whakamātau

This course focuses on creative exploration of design mediums including natural and synthetic materials. Students will learn and apply various manual and digital techniques through design experiments for development of expressive 3D objects for multisensory communication.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17126 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding I / Waehere ā-Auaha I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon, Thu 8.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Mon, Thu 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 17155 • ^ tba [Distance (NZ)]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 144 – Photographics / Ngā Whakaahuatanga

This course is an introduction to the photographic design principles, theories and methodologies. Through the completion of three projects, students will acquire a fundamental understanding of digital photography techniques.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17128 • ^ Tue 12.30-2pm [Te Aro], Tue 2-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 2.30-4pm [Te Aro], Thu 4-5.30pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 17156 • ^ Tue 3-4.30pm [Te Aro], Tue 4.30-6pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5pm [Te Aro], Thu 5-6.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 17157 • ^ tba [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design / Hoahoa ā-Whakairoiro

This course explores the basics of graphic design through a hands-on visual identity project. Students will learn about logos, typography, colour palettes, style guides, and more. It provides a good introduction to Communication Design skills. Students will learn about professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of materials that express the visual identity and voice of a brand.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30061 • Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 152 – Drawing I / Pikitia I

This course develops the technical skills of drawing and the understanding of human anatomy, kinesiology, perspective, motion, light, and proportion. This course will encourage students to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing. Skills learned can be applied in many design contexts and programmes.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 31136 • Tue 12.30-3pm [Te Aro], Tue 3-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 10.30-1pm [Te Aro], Thu 1-3.30pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 31166 • Tue, Thu 12.30-3pm [Te Aro], Tue, Thu 3-5.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31167 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 153 – Fashion Construction Studio I / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu I

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Mon 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 171 – Design in a Global Context / Hoahoa i te Horopaki o te Ao Whānui

By observing and analysing historical approaches and responses in and between cultures and design, students will explore design history from a place-based perspective. Analytical, critical and discursive skills, that demonstrate visual, oral and written communication will be emphasised.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17129 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31178 • tba [Distance (NZ)]

DSDN 172 – Cultural Narratives: Storytelling for Design / Kōrero Ahurea: Pakiwaitara Hei Hoahoa

Great visual storytellers challenge our notions of self and truth and become part of our history and cultural identities. This course enables the dissemination of Mātauranga Māori and other cultural knowledge via storytelling. Students will become creative, responsible arbiters of visual storytelling.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30062 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Mon 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 183 – Special Topic / Kaupapa Motuhake: Design Thinking for Sustainability

This course introduces design thinking and its interdisciplinary application in addressing interlinked and complex sustainability challenges. With broad-reaching application across disciplines, it includes the application of design thinking in addressing the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) within New Zealand and global contexts.

15 pts

3/3 • CRN 31186 • tba [Te Aro]

FADN 101 – Fashion Construction Studio I

This course covers the principles of designing patterns and researching material properties, covering a range of drawn and CAD-Based approaches. Students will explore the history and cultural theories related to fashion design, including matauranga Maori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a Context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 231 – Experimental Design Ideas

Building upon theory and practice, design experiments will explore phenomenological approaches to designing with and for sensory engagement. Supporting novelty, innovation and original thinking, this course develops a critical discourse between the act of designing and creative design research.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 171 and a further 45 100-level DSDN points

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 233 – Design Ethnography

Design Ethnography offers a cross-cultural survey of how people make sense of lived experience with, and through, the things they make. Students will be introduced to ways of doing ethnographic research about, and for, design—with a focus on creative storytelling and the ethics of collaboration.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 171, or ANTH 101 or 102, or approved course from the BA schedule

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 242 – Speculative Design

Students will explore the potential of design to provoke, question, and critique complex cultural, social and ethical issues. Through engagement in creative design practice, critical reading, and research, students will identify and assess theories regarding possible futures and apply this knowledge in the creation of critical designed outputs.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 171, 111

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 244 – Expanded Photographics

Photography is explored as both a creative process and a design research tool. Students engage in both photographic practice and theoretical exploration, articulating their response to the photographic medium and developing their theoretical tool kit for analysing new image forms in relation to design.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 144; (X) DSDN 244

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 271 – Design as Inquiry

Increasingly traditional and indigenous knowledge has been acknowledged in design strategies and ideologies as offering pathways towards positive social change and sustainable futures. As part of this discussion human behaviours, relationships and social impacts need to be considered. This course covers multi-disciplinary and multi-faceted design contexts that enable the research and development of a personal yet place based understanding of design.

20 pts • (P) 75 pts including either (DSDN 101, 111, 171) or (SARC 111, 151, 161) or or approved courses from the BA schedule

Not offered in 2020

DSDN 251 – Design Psychology

Students will address how designs affect our cognitive system. It will discuss state of the art theories and approaches for designing with affective states, behaviour, expectations and desires in mind. There will be a strong aesthetic and creative goal in mind through research and design projects.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 111

Not offered in 2020

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

1/3 • CRN 32107 • Tue 3.30-5pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 32108 • Tue 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

DSDN 281 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent study work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission from Head of School

Not offered in 2020

FADN 201 – Fashion Construction Studio II / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu II

In this intermediate course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and trialling various pattern design and manufacturing techniques to develop wearable forms. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique design position.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 153; acceptance into the FADN major

1/3 • CRN 32117 • Mon 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

FADN 202 – Fashion Construction Studio III / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu III

This intermediate course will extend on the principles of fashion design covered in FADN 201 with an emphasis on material research, which will require students to source and trial various textile processes. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique design position.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including FADN 201

2/3 • CRN 32115 • Tue 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 242 – Generative Textiles / Ngā Papanga ā-Waihanga

Using generative approaches to textile design informed by broad cultural contexts and/or emerging technologies students taking this course will explore the systemised creation of textiles. Students will be exposed to a range of software, manufacturing and production techniques to create artefacts using a constructive rather than restrictive set of rules.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 32121 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 273 – Fashion in Society / Kākahu i te Papori

Across human history, fashion has played an important role in every aspect of culture: religious order, social status, occupational position and rank, personal freedom (or lack thereof) and rejection of the status quo. In this course students will analyse precedents as well as cross-cultural examples, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design) that reveal the nuanced socio-political narratives embodied in the garments and objects that people wear.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 32123 • tba [Te Aro]

INDN 204 – Materialised Codes / Ngā Waehere i Puta

This course will explore a variety of approaches to material simulation and coded design processes. Topics covered will include advanced rendering, rapid digital iteration, and the translating of digital form to physical artefact. Students will look outside of traditional CAD software and expand their skills in the areas of polygon modelling and simulated materials to discover intuitive design and iteration processes. Students will present the outcomes of these digital design processes as highly refined rendered images and 3D printed materials.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 28186 • ^ Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 211 – Communicative Products / Ngā Hua o te Whakakōrero

Industrial designers communicate primarily through the physical aesthetic qualities of the products they create. In this founding industrial design course students will explore and expand their three dimensional visual vocabulary to empower them to produce meaningful and articulate objects. This will be based on experiments into a products form, material and surface finish explored through physical materials and digital manufacturing processes.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the INDN major

1/3 • CRN 17197 • ^ Mon 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 212 – Responsive Products / Ngā Hua o te Whakautu

This course investigates how industrially designed products respond to the people and environment in which they exist. This four dimensional quality of products offers significant opportunity for design experimentation and expression. Through the use of dynamic components students will be challenged to design specific, responsive products and experiences.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 17198 • Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

INDN 241 – Sustainable Mediums / Ngā Huarahi Toitūtanga

This course stimulates students to explore and experiment with a range of design-focused mediums, materials and techniques. In addition to material and technical proficiency students will gain competence in creating contextual design interventions and responsive objects with a specific focus on sustainability.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 28187 • ^ Fri 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 252 – Physiology Codes / Ngā Waehere ā-Mātai Whaiaroaro

This course examines the dynamic complexity of the body as a site, mapping personal variation, mechanics of movement and anatomy as the inspiration for products. 3D scanning and colour 3D printing will be used to collect data and create a tailored product.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17199 • ^ Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 221 – Sustainable Design / Hoahoa ā-Toitū

An introduction to the key concepts, theories and methodologies relevant to sustainable design and their application to a cross-disciplinary design practice. Students will develop awareness of sustainability from an ecological perspective and, within this context, will investigate the challenges and opportunities in propelling positive environmental, social, and cultural change through design. Fundamental sustainable design frameworks and strategies will be examined and applied through the development of creative studio-based projects.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) DSDN 283 in 2018–2019

1/3 • CRN 32130 • ^ Wed 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 233 – Design Ethnography I / Tā te Hoahoa Titiro I

Design Ethnography I introduces students to the ways in which design shapes - and is shaped by - cultural beliefs, values and norms. Students will critically explore different worldviews and their potential to support greater social justice through design.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) CCDN 233

1/3 • CRN 32129 • ^ Tue, Thu 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 242 – Speculative Design / Hoahoa ā-Whakapae

In this introductory course, students will explore the potential of design to question, critique and provoke complex cultural, political, and ethical issues. Through research, writing, reading and discussion, students will identify and critically assess speculative approaches to, and for, public engagement.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) CCDN 242

2/3 • CRN 32128 • ^ Mon 12.30-2pm [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-4pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 272 – Co-Design I / Hoahoa Mahi Ngātahi I

Co-design is a fundamental practice used within Social Innovation. It enables the co-creation of new social conditions and norms in communities, cities, and corporate cultures. Co-Design seeks to increase creativity, equity, social justice, resilience, and a healthy connection to nature. Students will plan, design, execute and communicate the results of a co-design process that aims to empower and facilitate change.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32127 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

CCDN 312 – Design for Social Value

Design for Social Value explores the underlying social, cultural, economic and political narratives and agendas that organise and/or impose constraints on society within our everyday lives. Through readings, collective discussions and both individual and collaborative studio work, students will use design to interpret and respond to social and cultural issues experienced by collectives alongside the relevant environments (both physical and digital) that influence them.

20 pts • (P) CCDN 271; 80 further 200-level pts including 40 BDI pts

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 331 – Design Manifestos

The development of a personal design standpoint to guide design practice is a critical tool in the design profession. This course explores and reflects upon contemporary culture, narratives, gestures and performances, and diverse disciplines in order to produce experimental and phenomenological design outcomes that serve to establish and frame a sense of individual design values.

20 pts • (P) CCDN 271; 80 further 200-level pts including 40 BDI pts

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 332 – Design+

This course explores the connections and affinities between design and other fields of study. Through a synthesis of knowledge, the integration, impact and influences amongst diverse disciplines will be investigated to express ideas and theories. Students will have the opportunity to resolve their parallel areas of study through unique strategies and methods of expression.

20 pts • (P) CCDN 271; 80 further 200-level pts including 40 BDI pts

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 342 – Advanced Topics in Design

This course will introduce students to a range of topics relevant to design practice today, including cross-cultural, ethical, political, and economic issues that impact our interactions with the environment and each other. Students will consider these expanded contexts in relation to a variety of design practices in order to foster greater sustainability, ecological well-being, and ethical practices.

20 pts • (P) CCDN 233 or 242

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 344 – Computer Generated Culture

Students will explore the practice and theory of computer generated culture. Students will engage with the nature of computer generated culture in all its many forms to consider its significance for the development of designand the design of contemporary culture.

20 pts • (P) 30 100-level DSDN pts; 40 200-level points from CCDN, IDDN, MDDN, FILM, MDIA, COMP, SWEN, NWEN

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 381 – Independent Study

Enrolment requires approval from Head of School.

20 pts • (P) Enrolment requires approval from Head of School.

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 384 – Welcome to the Future: Design in the Anthropocene

This course introduces students to the complex interconnections between design and the environment, and the implications of this changing relationship for the future of design practice. Through theoretical and practice- based inquiry, students will explore expanded contexts relevant to design including its impacts on ecological, social, and cultural sustainment.

20 pts • (P) CCDN271, or DSDN283, or with the approval of the course coordinator

Not offered in 2020

DSDN 311 – International Design Studio / Taupuni Hoahoa ā-Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed objects, spaces and sites, with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the technological, historical and cultural contexts that are part of, and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding. The course has two components: field analysis and studio project.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

DSDN 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

20 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32179 • tba [Te Aro]

INDN 311 – Publishable Products / Ngā Hua Hei Whakaputanga

This course challenges students to explore and engage with specific online publications that inspire them to design a product suitable for publication to an international audience. To reach this standard students will need to select appropriate media including immaculately finished visual prototypes, photography/video, rendering, animation and writing to create a compelling and contemporary narrative.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17200 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

INDN 312 – Brand + Identity

This course confronts students with the notion of the Brand and its implications in terms of design. Students are encouraged to explore beyond the purely commercial and engages issues of cultural reference, narrative, identity, perception of that identity, both local and global, as well as the role that functional innovation plays in Brand development. The challenge is to decide what is going 'too far' and what is 'not far enough' in a process of brand evolution rather than revolution. Projects are often undertaken in collaboration with industry partners.

20 pts • (P) INDN 311

Not offered in 2020

INDN 321 – Interactive Products / Ngā Hua Hei Pāhekohekotanga

Students will investigate real-world issues through interaction design methodologies to identify problems, needs and desires that can be addressed through physical and digital interactions. Students will learn to design scenarios and prototype interactions through quick 4D sketching. Students will work in participatory teams to apply tools for testing their designs and develop professional documentation skills using video.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including either 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or one of (MARK 203, COMP 313, ECEN 302, PSYC 325)

1/3 • CRN 28188 • ^ Tue 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 332 – Future Under Negotiation / Te Matapaki i te Anamata

This course explores industrial design from a historic, contemporary and future (speculative) perspective with a specific focus on the implications of technological evolution. Emerging issues such as artificial intelligence, biological printing and climate change will be explored through design experiments and scenario building.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

INDN 341 – Innovative Mediums / Ngā Huarahi Hei Auahatanga

This course asks students to plan and create design-driven innovations for the near future through bold experimentation with a variety of non-traditional mediums including smart materials, intelligent processes and emerging technologies. Students will enage in problem-solving strategies and agile learning to initiate, grow and propagate their ideas towards real-world implementation.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17202 • ^ Thu 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 342 – Fabrication Codes / Ngā Waehere Hei Waihanga

This course considers the relationship between digital creation - CAD (Computer Aided Design) and digital making/fabrication - CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing) and explores the design opportunities these technologies offer. Students will investigate a range of digital creation and manufacturing methods and produce designs that exploit these technologies.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 25156 • ^ Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Enrolment requires approval from Head of School.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 17203 • tba [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 26229 • tba [Te Aro]

INDN 382 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent study work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 17204 • tba [Te Aro]

INDN 390 – Industrial Design Capstone: Branded Products / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa ā-Ahumahi: Ngā Hua i Waituhia

This course introduces branding as a business concept to students. It explores the role that a product and associated services play in promoting and developing a company’s brand as well as the way a brand impacts on the perception and value of a product. As a capstone course, it offers an opportunity to integrate all the design skills and knowledge students have acquired to explore customised and connected products in both corporate and cultural contexts. Projects are often undertaken in collaboration with industry partners.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including INDN 211; (X) INDN 312

2/3 • CRN 32116 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 321 – Design in the Anthropocene / Hoahoa o Te Nāianei

This course introduces students to the complex interconnections between design and the environment, and the implications of this changing relationship for the future of design practice. Through theoretical and practice-based inquiry, students will explore expanded contexts relevant to design including its impacts on ecological, social, and cultural sustainment.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) CCDN 384 in 2018–2019

1/3 • CRN 32126 • ^ Fri 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 333 – Design Ethnography II / Tā te Hoahoa Titiro II

Building on SIDN 233 Design Ethnography I, this course offers students the opportunity to further develop their cultural research skills through field observations, interviews, interpretations, and reflections. Students will create a personal research portfolio to support further study and/or professional activities.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including SIDN 233

2/3 • CRN 32125 • ^ Tue 9.30-11 [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 372 – Service Design / Hoahoa ā-Ratonga

In this course students will plan infrastructure, organise people, communication tools, environments and materials within existing paradigms and networks to create sustainable pipelines and systems that acknowledge the health and well-being of both humans and nature.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32124 • ^ Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 382 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

This course is a directed individual study course.

15 pts • (P) 40 200-level BDI points

2/3 • CRN 32210 • tba [Te Aro]

SIDN 390 – Design for Social Innovation Capstone: Agents of Change / Whakatinana ā-Wheako: Kaiwhakatinana Panonitanga

Within Agents of Change students create solutions that can impact positive social, cultural, political, economic and/or environmental change. Students use design tools, research methodologies and emergent co- design practices to design prototypes, and communicate and analyse design interventions that offer transitional pathways towards positive change. Students engage with mana and manaaki, (respect and care) alongside whakawhanaungatanga (generation of authentic connections) as guiding values to impact social awareness and/or change.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including SIDN 233; acceptance into the SIDN major (X) CCDN 312

2/3 • CRN 32122 • ^ Mon 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Design Innovation

See Culture+Context, Industrial Design and Media Design

DSDN 101 – Design Visualisation / Pohewatanga ā-Hoahoa

Introduction to theories and practices of visual communication, investigated explicitly through various modes of visualisation across a wide range of media including web based media. Taught from an explicitly design perspective, emphases are given to expressive conceptual, contextual and formal modes.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17120 • ^ Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 104 – Object Codes: 3D Printing / Ngā Waehere ā-Mātāoroko: Tānga Ahu-Toru

This course engages 3D printing technologies to visualise and create 3D forms. Computer based studios explore leading edge 3D printing technologies and address the distinctive features of a 3D printing revolution.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17152 • ^ Thu 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 111 – Fundamental Principles of Design / Te Tūāpapa o te Hoahoa

This course is an introduction to generic design concepts, design vocabularies, and principles of design, taught in the studio environment using analogue and digital fabrication techniques. The design studio will develop inquiry, literacy and compositional skills in design such as video.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17123 • ^ Mon 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 112 – Interaction Design I / Hoahoa ā-Pāhekoheko I

In this course students analyse tangible and intangible interactions between people and things. Students are introduced to design concepts, vocabularies, basic coding, and practices of interaction design with an explicit focus on contextual and/or contemporary issues.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17124 • Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 132 – Animation and Visual Effects I / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Atataunaki I

This course introduces students to the practice of digital asset creation and animation for narrative media. Students will develop basic skill sets central to animation and visual effects production, including polygonal modelling, surface shading, texturing, lighting, and animation using 3D digital content creation software. Practical skills are complemented with design principles and technical concepts related to this studio practice.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

1/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 30003 • ^ tba [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 141 – Experimental Mediums / Ngā Huarahi Hei Whakamātau

This course focuses on creative exploration of design mediums including natural and synthetic materials. Students will learn and apply various manual and digital techniques through design experiments for development of expressive 3D objects for multisensory communication.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17126 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding I / Waehere ā-Auaha I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon, Thu 8.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Mon, Thu 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 17155 • ^ tba [Distance (NZ)]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 144 – Photographics / Ngā Whakaahuatanga

This course is an introduction to the photographic design principles, theories and methodologies. Through the completion of three projects, students will acquire a fundamental understanding of digital photography techniques.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17128 • ^ Tue 12.30-2pm [Te Aro], Tue 2-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 2.30-4pm [Te Aro], Thu 4-5.30pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 17156 • ^ Tue 3-4.30pm [Te Aro], Tue 4.30-6pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5pm [Te Aro], Thu 5-6.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 17157 • ^ tba [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design / Hoahoa ā-Whakairoiro

This course explores the basics of graphic design through a hands-on visual identity project. Students will learn about logos, typography, colour palettes, style guides, and more. It provides a good introduction to Communication Design skills. Students will learn about professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of materials that express the visual identity and voice of a brand.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30061 • Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 152 – Drawing I / Pikitia I

This course develops the technical skills of drawing and the understanding of human anatomy, kinesiology, perspective, motion, light, and proportion. This course will encourage students to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing. Skills learned can be applied in many design contexts and programmes.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 31136 • Tue 12.30-3pm [Te Aro], Tue 3-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 10.30-1pm [Te Aro], Thu 1-3.30pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 31166 • Tue, Thu 12.30-3pm [Te Aro], Tue, Thu 3-5.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31167 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 153 – Fashion Construction Studio I / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu I

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Mon 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 171 – Design in a Global Context / Hoahoa i te Horopaki o te Ao Whānui

By observing and analysing historical approaches and responses in and between cultures and design, students will explore design history from a place-based perspective. Analytical, critical and discursive skills, that demonstrate visual, oral and written communication will be emphasised.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17129 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31178 • tba [Distance (NZ)]

DSDN 172 – Cultural Narratives: Storytelling for Design / Kōrero Ahurea: Pakiwaitara Hei Hoahoa

Great visual storytellers challenge our notions of self and truth and become part of our history and cultural identities. This course enables the dissemination of Mātauranga Māori and other cultural knowledge via storytelling. Students will become creative, responsible arbiters of visual storytelling.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30062 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Mon 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 183 – Special Topic / Kaupapa Motuhake: Design Thinking for Sustainability

This course introduces design thinking and its interdisciplinary application in addressing interlinked and complex sustainability challenges. With broad-reaching application across disciplines, it includes the application of design thinking in addressing the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) within New Zealand and global contexts.

15 pts

3/3 • CRN 31186 • tba [Te Aro]

FADN 101 – Fashion Construction Studio I

This course covers the principles of designing patterns and researching material properties, covering a range of drawn and CAD-Based approaches. Students will explore the history and cultural theories related to fashion design, including matauranga Maori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a Context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts

Not offered in 2020

ANFX 201 – Animation and Visual Effects II / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata II

This course explores 3D design principles unique to creating animation and visual effects media, and techniques of 3D design. Students will create a series of digital artefacts for the screen. Tutorials cover development methods specific to digital content, with an emphasis on engaging in an effective design process. In lab sessions students will use 3D modelling software and 2D image manipulation software to generate compelling and innovative visual imagery that demonstrates an understanding of animation and visual effects media.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 132; CGRA 151 or acceptance into the ANFX major

1/3 • CRN 31161 • Wed 3.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 211 – Character Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Kiripuaki I

This course offers an introduction to animated storytelling through the art of character animation. We survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, from large scale studio features to experimental auteur films. In response students will create their own animated films by designing, building and rigging characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students will gain insight into animated film production workflows and will acquire the technical skills to bring their story ideas to fruition. This course will be offered for the first time in 2020.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 132; and 15 further points from the BDI or BAS Schedules

2/3 • CRN 31162 • Mon 5.30-6.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 4.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 221 – Digital 2D Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua I

This course introduces digital 2D and frame-by-frame techniques in modern animation practice. Historical and contemporary examples will be studied including classic feature films, independent shorts, music videos, and video games. Students will apply basic animation principles and learn introductory 2D techniques within a digital workflow, suitable to professional or personal practice.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses

2/3 • CRN 32097 • ^ Mon 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 3.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 231 – Stop Motion Animation / Pakiwaituhi Whakatū Nekehanga

The course explores techniques in stop-motion puppet construction, onset lighting, and animation. Students will build a fully articulated puppet and light and animate it using a combination of established industry practices such as digital and in-camera frame-by-frame techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses

Not offered in 2020

ANFX 271 – History of Animation and Visual Effects / Hītōria Pakiwaituhi, Mariko Ataata

This course explores how technology and filmmaking have utilised visual effects as an integral storytelling tool since the earliest days of cinema. Students will explore various forms including the cinema of attractions, the phenomenon of the uncanny valley and international precedents, the contemporary high-fantasy of blockbuster Hollywood films, and finally the future of the form.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ANFX 272 – Fictional Narratives – Storytelling for Design / Kōrero Pakiwaitara – Pakiwaitara Hei Hoahoa

This course explores the ideation and practical process of writing and visual development for animated media. Core principles such as structure, plot, character, world building and personal vision are explored alongside the way in which technology and transmedia practices are increasingly shaping storytelling.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 32001 • Tue 3.30-6.30pm [Te Aro]

CCDN 231 – Experimental Design Ideas

Building upon theory and practice, design experiments will explore phenomenological approaches to designing with and for sensory engagement. Supporting novelty, innovation and original thinking, this course develops a critical discourse between the act of designing and creative design research.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 171 and a further 45 100-level DSDN points

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 233 – Design Ethnography

Design Ethnography offers a cross-cultural survey of how people make sense of lived experience with, and through, the things they make. Students will be introduced to ways of doing ethnographic research about, and for, design—with a focus on creative storytelling and the ethics of collaboration.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 171, or ANTH 101 or 102, or approved course from the BA schedule

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 242 – Speculative Design

Students will explore the potential of design to provoke, question, and critique complex cultural, social and ethical issues. Through engagement in creative design practice, critical reading, and research, students will identify and assess theories regarding possible futures and apply this knowledge in the creation of critical designed outputs.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 171, 111

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 244 – Expanded Photographics

Photography is explored as both a creative process and a design research tool. Students engage in both photographic practice and theoretical exploration, articulating their response to the photographic medium and developing their theoretical tool kit for analysing new image forms in relation to design.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 144; (X) DSDN 244

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 271 – Design as Inquiry

Increasingly traditional and indigenous knowledge has been acknowledged in design strategies and ideologies as offering pathways towards positive social change and sustainable futures. As part of this discussion human behaviours, relationships and social impacts need to be considered. This course covers multi-disciplinary and multi-faceted design contexts that enable the research and development of a personal yet place based understanding of design.

20 pts • (P) 75 pts including either (DSDN 101, 111, 171) or (SARC 111, 151, 161) or or approved courses from the BA schedule

Not offered in 2020

COMD 201 – Type & Image I / Te Momo me te Whakaahua I

This course is about working with type. Students will learn the anatomy, rules and techniques of typography, the history of type development and how this informs the use of type in contemporary communication. They will become familiar with both historical and contemporary typographic styles and genres and develop a critical eye for the complexities of typography. There will be an intensive study of typographic hierarchies and expressive typography through practical exercises.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the COMD major

1/3 • CRN 30072 • ^ Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 211 – Drawing II / Tuhi Pikitia II

This course will allow students to practice traditional and contemporary approaches to both observational and imaginative drawing. In addition to building on skills and techniques developed in DSDN 152 Drawing I, students will be encouraged to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 152 and 15 further points from the BDI or BAS Schedules

1/3 • CRN 30073 • Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

COMD 231 – Illustration / Pikitia Whakaari

In this course students will learn to illustrate and use illustration thoughtfully and effectively in a range of media. Historical and contemporary approaches will be studied from various perspectives: aesthetic, social, and commercial. Students will develop and complete illustration project briefs using a range of digital and physical tools and techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS Schedules or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30074 • ^ Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 241 – Visual Narratives / Ngā Paki Ataata

This course focuses on the structure and methods of effective storytelling, as expressed visually. Readings provide a broad survey of stories that employ visual narratives in innovative or instructive ways. Techniques are drawn from comics, books, graphic novels, film, children's books, and animation. Students learn how to tell a story using visual language.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM courses or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30075 • ^ Mon 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 251 – Information Design / Hoahoa ā-Pārongo

This course addresses the demand for well-designed visual presentation of data in the information age. The course is interdisciplinary, combining skills from graphic design, interaction design, and data science. Students practice information design skills with applications beyond the traditional design professions. Students will shape data-driven messages in order to make knowledge accessible visually. This course will first be offered in 2021.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 261 – Motion Design I / Hoahoa ā-Nekehanga I

This course introduces basic concepts of motion design and time-based media in communication and graphic environments. Topics covered include introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery, graphic animation, as well as creative strategies and workflow. Students will apply concepts from motion design to time-based projects and outputs.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP/FILM courses or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32098 • ^ Tue, Thu 3.30-5pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 251 – Design Psychology

Students will address how designs affect our cognitive system. It will discuss state of the art theories and approaches for designing with affective states, behaviour, expectations and desires in mind. There will be a strong aesthetic and creative goal in mind through research and design projects.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 111

Not offered in 2020

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

1/3 • CRN 32107 • Tue 3.30-5pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 32108 • Tue 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

DSDN 281 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent study work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission from Head of School

Not offered in 2020

FADN 201 – Fashion Construction Studio II / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu II

In this intermediate course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and trialling various pattern design and manufacturing techniques to develop wearable forms. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique design position.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 153; acceptance into the FADN major

1/3 • CRN 32117 • Mon 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

FADN 202 – Fashion Construction Studio III / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu III

This intermediate course will extend on the principles of fashion design covered in FADN 201 with an emphasis on material research, which will require students to source and trial various textile processes. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique design position.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including FADN 201

2/3 • CRN 32115 • Tue 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 242 – Generative Textiles / Ngā Papanga ā-Waihanga

Using generative approaches to textile design informed by broad cultural contexts and/or emerging technologies students taking this course will explore the systemised creation of textiles. Students will be exposed to a range of software, manufacturing and production techniques to create artefacts using a constructive rather than restrictive set of rules.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 32121 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 273 – Fashion in Society / Kākahu i te Papori

Across human history, fashion has played an important role in every aspect of culture: religious order, social status, occupational position and rank, personal freedom (or lack thereof) and rejection of the status quo. In this course students will analyse precedents as well as cross-cultural examples, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design) that reveal the nuanced socio-political narratives embodied in the garments and objects that people wear.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 32123 • tba [Te Aro]

INDN 204 – Materialised Codes / Ngā Waehere i Puta

This course will explore a variety of approaches to material simulation and coded design processes. Topics covered will include advanced rendering, rapid digital iteration, and the translating of digital form to physical artefact. Students will look outside of traditional CAD software and expand their skills in the areas of polygon modelling and simulated materials to discover intuitive design and iteration processes. Students will present the outcomes of these digital design processes as highly refined rendered images and 3D printed materials.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 28186 • ^ Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 211 – Communicative Products / Ngā Hua o te Whakakōrero

Industrial designers communicate primarily through the physical aesthetic qualities of the products they create. In this founding industrial design course students will explore and expand their three dimensional visual vocabulary to empower them to produce meaningful and articulate objects. This will be based on experiments into a products form, material and surface finish explored through physical materials and digital manufacturing processes.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the INDN major

1/3 • CRN 17197 • ^ Mon 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 212 – Responsive Products / Ngā Hua o te Whakautu

This course investigates how industrially designed products respond to the people and environment in which they exist. This four dimensional quality of products offers significant opportunity for design experimentation and expression. Through the use of dynamic components students will be challenged to design specific, responsive products and experiences.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 17198 • Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

INDN 241 – Sustainable Mediums / Ngā Huarahi Toitūtanga

This course stimulates students to explore and experiment with a range of design-focused mediums, materials and techniques. In addition to material and technical proficiency students will gain competence in creating contextual design interventions and responsive objects with a specific focus on sustainability.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 28187 • ^ Fri 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 252 – Physiology Codes / Ngā Waehere ā-Mātai Whaiaroaro

This course examines the dynamic complexity of the body as a site, mapping personal variation, mechanics of movement and anatomy as the inspiration for products. 3D scanning and colour 3D printing will be used to collect data and create a tailored product.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17199 • ^ Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 201 – Design for Experience I / Hoahoa kia Whai Wheako I

In this course students will learn about the process of user experience (UX) design, and common research and design techniques, such as: observation, interviews, prototyping and user testing. Students will also become skilled at using industry-standard tools and software.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the IXXN major

1/3 • CRN 30063 • ^ Tue 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 211 – Design Psychology I / Mātai Hinengaro ā-Hoahoa I

Students will learn how designs can affect our thinking, our emotions and our actions. The course will introduce students to basic psychology principles. Through the practice of designing students will learn how to use psychology principles and methods to inspire, guide and refine their design process. There will be a strong aesthetic and creative goal in mind throughout the projects.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) DSDN 251

2/3 • CRN 32120 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 221 – Web Design I / Hoahoa ā-Ipurangi I

In this course students explore and implement Web design tools and techniques. An emphasis is placed on creative approaches to front-end development, design and scripting techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 points from BDI or BAS Schedules or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30064 • ^ Tue, Thu 3.30-5pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 201 – Internet Design and Social Media Design / Hoahoa ā-Ipurangi me te Hoahoa Arapāho ā-Papori

In this course students will learn to design for digitally networked infrastructures such as the Internet, and the various protocols and frameworks that belong to this ever-expanding realm. Topics will include networking basics, Internet cultures and the privacy paradox, with a particular emphasis on designing for Social Media and critical analysis of the complex media environments that this creates.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 points from BDI or BAS Schedules

2/3 • CRN 17207 • ^ Tue, Wed 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 211 – Digital Video Creation / Auaha Ata Matihiko

In this course students will conceive, shoot, edit, and remix video-based projects. Students will learn video editing techniques, shooting video using DSLR cameras, elementary lighting, codecs, compositing, cinematography, and working with audio alongside building video content.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 points from BDI or BAS Schedules

1/3 • CRN 18235 • ^ Tue, Thu 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 221 – Game Design I / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu Rorohiko I

Students are introduced to indie games, arcade games and early home console experiences as a pathway to understanding the fundamental requirements of game design. The course includes game mechanics, core loops and techniques of implementation that contribute to the creation of engaging and interactive gaming experiences. Students will use game design software and establish basic game programming knowledge, and gain the capabilities to ideate, pitch concepts, and develop playable 2D games using a variety of software applications.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) MDDN 243

1/3 • CRN 32171 • ^ Mon, Thu 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 222 – Virtual Reality Studio / Taupuni Ao Mariko

Students are introduced to the histories and technical development of Virtual Reality both as a field of inquiry and as a creative platform for novel and engaging multimedia experiences. Topics include examples of VR from a variety of fields such as science, cinematography and new media arts. Students will critically evaluate contemporary VR environments using state of the art technology including a variety of hardware platforms.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 32110 • ^ Wed, Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 231 – Physical Computing / Rorohiko ā-Ōkiko

Introduction to electronics, circuit design, and programming as design tools for creative electronic solutions. This course is for students wishing to explore physical computing and interaction design (including IoT). Thinking beyond the mouse/keyboard/screen paradigm, simple techniques using microcontrollers and sensors will be taught to build smart objects and systems.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) MDDN 251

2/3 • CRN 32170 • ^ Mon, Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 242 – Creative Coding II / Waehere ā-Auaha II

This course focuses on working with simple algorithms to generate visuals, as well as compositing different media, such as photography. Inspired by real world phenomena, this course uses parameterised design and generative modelling to produce creative coded design solutions.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules and including one of (DSDN 142, COMP 102, 112)

1/3 • CRN 19917 • ^ Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 243 – Introduction to Computer Game Design

A production and theory course, focussing on understanding the wider significance of computer gaming, and the game prototyping techniques of smaller scale "indie" or independent game development. Students explore the industry-based practice of combining game design, game programming and game art production when building their own game in groups.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 101, 112; one of DSDN 142, COMP 102, 112

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 244 – Expanded Photographics / Whakawhānui Whakaahua

Photography is explored as both a creative process and a design research tool. Students engage in both photographic practice and theoretical exploration, articulating their response to the photographic medium and developing their theoretical tool kit for analysing new image forms in relation to multiple types of design.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 144 (X) CCDN 244

1/3 • CRN 32111 • ^ Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 251 – Physical Computing

Introduction to electronics, circuit design, and programming as design tools for creative electronic solutions. This course is for students wishing to explore physical computing and interaction design (including IoT). Thinking beyond the mouse/keyboard/screen paradigm, simple techniques using microcontrollers and sensors will be taught to build smart objects and systems.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 101; one of DSDN 112, 142, COMP 102, 112

Not offered in 2020

SIDN 221 – Sustainable Design / Hoahoa ā-Toitū

An introduction to the key concepts, theories and methodologies relevant to sustainable design and their application to a cross-disciplinary design practice. Students will develop awareness of sustainability from an ecological perspective and, within this context, will investigate the challenges and opportunities in propelling positive environmental, social, and cultural change through design. Fundamental sustainable design frameworks and strategies will be examined and applied through the development of creative studio-based projects.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) DSDN 283 in 2018–2019

1/3 • CRN 32130 • ^ Wed 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 233 – Design Ethnography I / Tā te Hoahoa Titiro I

Design Ethnography I introduces students to the ways in which design shapes - and is shaped by - cultural beliefs, values and norms. Students will critically explore different worldviews and their potential to support greater social justice through design.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) CCDN 233

1/3 • CRN 32129 • ^ Tue, Thu 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 242 – Speculative Design / Hoahoa ā-Whakapae

In this introductory course, students will explore the potential of design to question, critique and provoke complex cultural, political, and ethical issues. Through research, writing, reading and discussion, students will identify and critically assess speculative approaches to, and for, public engagement.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) CCDN 242

2/3 • CRN 32128 • ^ Mon 12.30-2pm [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-4pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 272 – Co-Design I / Hoahoa Mahi Ngātahi I

Co-design is a fundamental practice used within Social Innovation. It enables the co-creation of new social conditions and norms in communities, cities, and corporate cultures. Co-Design seeks to increase creativity, equity, social justice, resilience, and a healthy connection to nature. Students will plan, design, execute and communicate the results of a co-design process that aims to empower and facilitate change.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32127 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 301 – Animation and Visual Effects III / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata III

Advanced topics in animation will be explored in this course, particularly around newly emerging technologies and procedural processes. Students will have the opportunity to conduct research, informing their own path for exploration in one of three areas: data acquisition, procedural modelling or asset development. These explorations will be put into practice – incorporating this knowledge in a short production.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 201

1/3 • CRN 32002 • Tue, Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

ANFX 311 – Character Animation II / Pakiwaituhi ā-Kiripuaki II

This course builds on Character Animation I and continues to examine animation through the art of character animation. Students survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, focusing on contemporary animation. Students will design, build, and rig characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students delve deeper into animated film production workflows and will refine the technical skills required to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 211

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 312 – Design for Social Value

Design for Social Value explores the underlying social, cultural, economic and political narratives and agendas that organise and/or impose constraints on society within our everyday lives. Through readings, collective discussions and both individual and collaborative studio work, students will use design to interpret and respond to social and cultural issues experienced by collectives alongside the relevant environments (both physical and digital) that influence them.

20 pts • (P) CCDN 271; 80 further 200-level pts including 40 BDI pts

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 331 – Design Manifestos

The development of a personal design standpoint to guide design practice is a critical tool in the design profession. This course explores and reflects upon contemporary culture, narratives, gestures and performances, and diverse disciplines in order to produce experimental and phenomenological design outcomes that serve to establish and frame a sense of individual design values.

20 pts • (P) CCDN 271; 80 further 200-level pts including 40 BDI pts

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 332 – Design+

This course explores the connections and affinities between design and other fields of study. Through a synthesis of knowledge, the integration, impact and influences amongst diverse disciplines will be investigated to express ideas and theories. Students will have the opportunity to resolve their parallel areas of study through unique strategies and methods of expression.

20 pts • (P) CCDN 271; 80 further 200-level pts including 40 BDI pts

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 342 – Advanced Topics in Design

This course will introduce students to a range of topics relevant to design practice today, including cross-cultural, ethical, political, and economic issues that impact our interactions with the environment and each other. Students will consider these expanded contexts in relation to a variety of design practices in order to foster greater sustainability, ecological well-being, and ethical practices.

20 pts • (P) CCDN 233 or 242

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 344 – Computer Generated Culture

Students will explore the practice and theory of computer generated culture. Students will engage with the nature of computer generated culture in all its many forms to consider its significance for the development of designand the design of contemporary culture.

20 pts • (P) 30 100-level DSDN pts; 40 200-level points from CCDN, IDDN, MDDN, FILM, MDIA, COMP, SWEN, NWEN

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 381 – Independent Study

Enrolment requires approval from Head of School.

20 pts • (P) Enrolment requires approval from Head of School.

Not offered in 2020

CCDN 384 – Welcome to the Future: Design in the Anthropocene

This course introduces students to the complex interconnections between design and the environment, and the implications of this changing relationship for the future of design practice. Through theoretical and practice- based inquiry, students will explore expanded contexts relevant to design including its impacts on ecological, social, and cultural sustainment.

20 pts • (P) CCDN271, or DSDN283, or with the approval of the course coordinator

Not offered in 2020

COMD 301 – Communication Design Capstone

Starting from seminar-style discussions, students will develop their own briefs that address an advanced communication design problem, building and expanding upon individual skills and interests. This course first runs in 2020.

20 pts • (P) 60 points from COMD 200-399

Not offered in 2020

COMD 302 – Type & Image II / Te Momo me te Whakaahua II

Students will build on the typographic principles learnt in COMD 201 Type & Image I and apply them to more ambitious projects. They will hone and refine their critical eye for typography and delve deeper into its anatomy, materiality, and complexities. There will be an intensive study of typographic hierarchies and expressive typography through practical exercises. Projects will introduce opportunities to work within constraints and also to challenge traditional typographic rules.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including COMD 201

2/3 • CRN 32099 • ^ Wed 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 321 – Advertising in Aotearoa

Students will learn the historical developments in advertising along with current practises, used to maximise the potential for promoting products/services or addressing a contemporaneously vital issue. Working from graphic design and illustration principles, students will develop a comprehensive advertising campaign as a final project. This course will first run in 2020.

20 pts • (P) COMD 201, 231

Not offered in 2020

COMD 325 – Print Media Now: Design for Publications / Arapāho Mātātuhi o Nāianei: Hoahoa mō ngā Whakaputanga

This course introduces students to specialist print design skills and knowledge. Print will be explored in many contexts, from hot metal and letterpress processes through the University’s own letterpress workshop, through to contemporary in-studio processes, such as silkscreen printing and risograph printing. There will be a particular emphasis on the craft of book design, taking a broad view of what defines a book – from simple zine-making through to more complex artefacts.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 32101 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 331 – Concept Art and World Building / Toi Ariā me te Waihanga ā-Ao

In this course students will use a variety of techniques to craft concepts and visual images that convey speculative or fictional worlds. Contemporary and historical approaches to concept art will be critically analysed. World building across media (illustration, graphic novels, film, animation, books, and games) will be explored through examples and exercises.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM/THEA/WRIT courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 335 – Comics and Graphic Novels / Pukawaituhi me ngā Pakimaero Waituhi

This course examines formal aspects of comics and graphic novels, their historical development, visual vocabulary, and narrative applications. Readings provide examples of effective graphic storytelling and survey theoretical and practical approaches to the form. Students will develop and complete their own comics.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM/THEA/WRIT courses or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32104 • ^ Mon 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 342 – Generative Graphic Design / Hoahoa Waihanga Whakairoiro

Students will use a design process, set of instructions, or computer programme, to generate a solution that blends design artistry with artificially generated output. This blend of traditional and emerging techniques will produce surprising outcomes. Students will create and analyse generative works. The purpose of the course is to explore how generative techniques can add to a design practice.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 351 – Writing for Design / Tuhituhi mō te Hoahoa

Students taking this course will develop a command of writing styles for use in creative practice. Projects will delve into self-reflective and exploratory writing about design, as well as critical interpretation. The course will also cover writing techniques that serve creative practice, such as client briefs, feedback and reports.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI schedule or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 30081 • Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

COMD 361 – Motion Design II / Hoahoa ā-Nekehanga II

This course expands upon the basic concepts mastered in COMD 261 Motion Design I, introducing specialised skills and blended techniques. Weekly screenings of contemporary motion design work will be used as a basis for discussion and analysis of intermediate motion design principles. Through applied practice, students will explore specialised design, motion, and narrative communication in a series of self-designed and directed projects. This course will first be offered in 2021.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including COMD 261

Not offered in 2020

COMD 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent student work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 382 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent student work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

COMD 390 – Communication Design Capstone: Plan, Produce, Publish / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Kōrero Hoahoa: Whakamahere, Whakatinana, Whakaputa

In this course students produce a final work to demonstrate the skills and knowledge gained in Communication Design. Students complete a large studio-based project or portfolio demonstrating design mastery. In seminar-style discussions, students develop their own briefs or portfolio goals that address advanced problems or questions in communication design. Projects are published, and engagement with a community beyond the school is a goal of the work in this course.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including COMD 201 (X) COMD 301

2/3 • CRN 32105 • ^ Mon 10.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 311 – International Design Studio / Taupuni Hoahoa ā-Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed objects, spaces and sites, with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the technological, historical and cultural contexts that are part of, and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding. The course has two components: field analysis and studio project.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

DSDN 311 – International Design Studio / Taupuni Hoahoa ā-Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed objects, spaces and sites, with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the technological, historical and cultural contexts that are part of, and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding. The course has two components: field analysis and studio project.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

DSDN 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

20 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32179 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

20 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

INDN 311 – Publishable Products / Ngā Hua Hei Whakaputanga

This course challenges students to explore and engage with specific online publications that inspire them to design a product suitable for publication to an international audience. To reach this standard students will need to select appropriate media including immaculately finished visual prototypes, photography/video, rendering, animation and writing to create a compelling and contemporary narrative.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17200 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

INDN 312 – Brand + Identity

This course confronts students with the notion of the Brand and its implications in terms of design. Students are encouraged to explore beyond the purely commercial and engages issues of cultural reference, narrative, identity, perception of that identity, both local and global, as well as the role that functional innovation plays in Brand development. The challenge is to decide what is going 'too far' and what is 'not far enough' in a process of brand evolution rather than revolution. Projects are often undertaken in collaboration with industry partners.

20 pts • (P) INDN 311

Not offered in 2020

INDN 321 – Interactive Products / Ngā Hua Hei Pāhekohekotanga

Students will investigate real-world issues through interaction design methodologies to identify problems, needs and desires that can be addressed through physical and digital interactions. Students will learn to design scenarios and prototype interactions through quick 4D sketching. Students will work in participatory teams to apply tools for testing their designs and develop professional documentation skills using video.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including either 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or one of (MARK 203, COMP 313, ECEN 302, PSYC 325)

1/3 • CRN 28188 • ^ Tue 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 332 – Future Under Negotiation / Te Matapaki i te Anamata

This course explores industrial design from a historic, contemporary and future (speculative) perspective with a specific focus on the implications of technological evolution. Emerging issues such as artificial intelligence, biological printing and climate change will be explored through design experiments and scenario building.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

INDN 341 – Innovative Mediums / Ngā Huarahi Hei Auahatanga

This course asks students to plan and create design-driven innovations for the near future through bold experimentation with a variety of non-traditional mediums including smart materials, intelligent processes and emerging technologies. Students will enage in problem-solving strategies and agile learning to initiate, grow and propagate their ideas towards real-world implementation.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17202 • ^ Thu 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 342 – Fabrication Codes / Ngā Waehere Hei Waihanga

This course considers the relationship between digital creation - CAD (Computer Aided Design) and digital making/fabrication - CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing) and explores the design opportunities these technologies offer. Students will investigate a range of digital creation and manufacturing methods and produce designs that exploit these technologies.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 25156 • ^ Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Enrolment requires approval from Head of School.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 17203 • tba [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 26229 • tba [Te Aro]

INDN 382 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent study work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 17204 • tba [Te Aro]

INDN 390 – Industrial Design Capstone: Branded Products / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa ā-Ahumahi: Ngā Hua i Waituhia

This course introduces branding as a business concept to students. It explores the role that a product and associated services play in promoting and developing a company’s brand as well as the way a brand impacts on the perception and value of a product. As a capstone course, it offers an opportunity to integrate all the design skills and knowledge students have acquired to explore customised and connected products in both corporate and cultural contexts. Projects are often undertaken in collaboration with industry partners.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including INDN 211; (X) INDN 312

2/3 • CRN 32116 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 390 – Industrial Design Capstone: Branded Products / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa ā-Ahumahi: Ngā Hua i Waituhia

This course introduces branding as a business concept to students. It explores the role that a product and associated services play in promoting and developing a company’s brand as well as the way a brand impacts on the perception and value of a product. As a capstone course, it offers an opportunity to integrate all the design skills and knowledge students have acquired to explore customised and connected products in both corporate and cultural contexts. Projects are often undertaken in collaboration with industry partners.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including INDN 211; (X) INDN 312

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 301 – Interaction Design Capstone

Starting from seminar-style discussions, Students will develop their own briefs that address an advanced interaction design problem, building and expanding upon individual skills and interests. This course will first run in 2020.

20 pts • (P) IXXN 201

Not offered in 2020

IXXN 302 – Design for Experience II / Hoahoa kia Whai Wheako II

In this course students will become adept at user experience (UX) design techniques, such as: case study analysis, user interface design, rapid visualisation and prototyping. Students will also become skilled at using the industry standard tools and techniques of UX design.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including IXXN 201

1/3 • CRN 32119 • ^ Thu 10.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 321 – Web Design II / Hoahoa ā-Ipurangi II

In this course students gain a command of Web Design tools and techniques. An emphasis is placed on code-driven approaches to site development and management. Further investigations will include designing with data using scripting/coding techniques. This course first runs in 2020.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including IXXN 221

1/3 • CRN 30066 • Fri 10.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

IXXN 341 – Design for Health / Hoahoa kia Whai Hauora

This course introduces students to the wide range of opportunities for design to inform healthcare products and services. The course includes introduction to methods for working with clinicians and patients and how to design physical devices and digital interactions to address specific physiological requirements for a range of health conditions.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

IXXN 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent student work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

IXXN 382 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent student work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permssion of Head of School.

Not offered in 2020

IXXN 390 – Interaction Design Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa ā-Pāhekoheko

This course facilitates the development of a major interaction design project that builds and expands on skills learned in the programme and individual interests of the students. Starting from seminar-style discussions, students will develop their own briefs that address an advanced interaction design problem, select appropriate methods for addressing it, develop a working design and test its efficacy in context.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including IXXN 302 (X) IXXN 301

2/3 • CRN 32118 • ^ Tue 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 301 – Mobile Media and Mixed Reality / Arapāho ā-Aorau

Using contemporary approaches to Augmented Reality (AR) and related paradigms such as 'Mixed Reality', students will create designs solutions that feature compact, mobile, and networked technology. Through theory and practice, students will consider the cultural significance of these new tools from a variety of sociocultural perspectives. Students learn to use a range of design skills to arrive at novel AR solutions.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including MDDN 201; (X) MDDN 352

2/3 • CRN 32173 • ^ Tue, Wed 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 311 – Postproduction and Special Effects

Digital media products such as film special effects and games often require the creation of novel visual experiences while working within large professional graphics software packages. In this course students will gain experience stretching the boundaries of these packages, including the use of programmed extension and generative approaches.

20 pts • (P) DSDN 132, MDDN 211, 20 further pts from MDDN 200-level

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 314 – Audio-Visual Space / Whaitua Ataata-Rongo

Students will investigate processes and strategies involved in the production of time-based media, including audio recording, editing and manipulation techniques. Revolving around the topic of audio-visual space, course projects will allow students to explore the psychology of perception and concepts of spatiality within audio and video design.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 19914 • ^ Mon, Wed 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 321 – Game Design II / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu Rorohiko II

In this course students will build on the knowledge gained in Game Design I to design within the expanded parameters of a 3D environment. Using games as a medium of exploration, including examples from the early transitional period of 2D to 3D gaming as design precedents, students will gain a broader comprehension of contemporary gaming as the medium continues to develop.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including MDDN 221 (X) MDDN 343

2/3 • CRN 32172 • ^ Mon, Thu 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 331 – Wearable Technology / Hangarau Hei Kākahu Mau

Students will explore the field of wearable technology through research and practical experimentation. They will learn how to use various technologies to create successful reactive and interactive wearable projects.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) MDDN 351

1/3 • CRN 32169 • ^ Tue, Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 333 – Data Driven Design / Hoahoa Ānga ā-Raraunga

This course focuses on the interpretation and presentation of data. Datasets are combined with programming and scripting tools to provide context to our digitized information systems and databases. Students will work with data sources from science, the humanities and commerce to design solutions to real-world problems using data.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or from DATA/COMP courses

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 342 – Creative Coding III / Waehere ā-Auaha III

Creative Coding III builds on the content taught in Creative Coding I and II and extends the use of procedural and parameterised design strategies. Students will be taught advanced computer graphics and data mapping techniques in order to create dynamic visuals and assets for use in screen-based media.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including MDDN 242

2/3 • CRN 28190 • ^ Mon, Thu 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 343 – Advanced Computer Game Design

Advanced techniques in computer game design and examination of the emerging areas of computer gaming and professional practice. The course focuses on a production-based approach where students build their own computer games using 3D tools for modelling, interactive animation and experiences that are immersive.

20 pts • (P) Two courses from ANFX 201, MDDN 243, 241, 242

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 344 – Computational Culture / Ahurea Pūnaha ā-Rorohiko

Students will explore the impact that computation has had upon design and culture. Using infographics and data visualisation, students will engage with the nature of computation in all its many forms and use it visually to communicate its past, present and potential future impacts.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) CCDN 344

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 351 – Wearable Technology

An examination of the many categories of wearable technology, as well as closely related fields, such as wearable computing, techno fashion, electronic textiles, intelligent jewellery and smart clothes. Guest lectures by wearable technology and art designers are planned. Students will research, experiment with and design wearable technology projects.

20 pts • (P) Two courses from 200-level INDN or MDDN

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 352 – Mobile Media

An introduction to topics in creating designs that feature compact, mobile and networked technology. In addition to learning a range of skills used in designing such systems, students will also be considering the cultural significance of ubiquitous computing from a variety of sociocultural perspectives.

20 pts • (P) Two courses from MDDN, COMP, NWEN, SWEN 200-299 level including at least one MDDN course

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent student work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 382 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

This independent study is set up to allow the student to develop his/her skills and experience in applied research in online training and communication by focusing on video production and post-production, and web development and web-based marketing.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

MDDN 390 – Media Design Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa Arapāho

Students will develop their own briefs that address an advanced media design problem that builds and expands on individual skills and interests to produce an industry-standard designed output. This course will be first offered in 2021.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 200-level points from MDDN courses

Not offered in 2020

SIDN 321 – Design in the Anthropocene / Hoahoa o Te Nāianei

This course introduces students to the complex interconnections between design and the environment, and the implications of this changing relationship for the future of design practice. Through theoretical and practice-based inquiry, students will explore expanded contexts relevant to design including its impacts on ecological, social, and cultural sustainment.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) CCDN 384 in 2018–2019

1/3 • CRN 32126 • ^ Fri 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 333 – Design Ethnography II / Tā te Hoahoa Titiro II

Building on SIDN 233 Design Ethnography I, this course offers students the opportunity to further develop their cultural research skills through field observations, interviews, interpretations, and reflections. Students will create a personal research portfolio to support further study and/or professional activities.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including SIDN 233

2/3 • CRN 32125 • ^ Tue 9.30-11 [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 372 – Service Design / Hoahoa ā-Ratonga

In this course students will plan infrastructure, organise people, communication tools, environments and materials within existing paradigms and networks to create sustainable pipelines and systems that acknowledge the health and well-being of both humans and nature.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32124 • ^ Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 382 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

This course is a directed individual study course.

15 pts • (P) 40 200-level BDI points

2/3 • CRN 32210 • tba [Te Aro]

SIDN 390 – Design for Social Innovation Capstone: Agents of Change / Whakatinana ā-Wheako: Kaiwhakatinana Panonitanga

Within Agents of Change students create solutions that can impact positive social, cultural, political, economic and/or environmental change. Students use design tools, research methodologies and emergent co- design practices to design prototypes, and communicate and analyse design interventions that offer transitional pathways towards positive change. Students engage with mana and manaaki, (respect and care) alongside whakawhanaungatanga (generation of authentic connections) as guiding values to impact social awareness and/or change.

30 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including SIDN 233; acceptance into the SIDN major (X) CCDN 312

2/3 • CRN 32122 • ^ Mon 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Earth Sciences

ESCI 111 – The Earth System: An Introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Sciences

An introduction to fundamental concepts in Physical Geography and Earth Sciences. The physical processes that shape and have shaped the Earth are the focus of this course. An important emphasis is on human interaction with the environment. This course provides fundamental knowledge for understanding our environment and a platform for further study. Field work in the Wellington area is included.

15 pts • (X) GEOG 111 (D) GEOG 111

1/3 • CRN 9469 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 112 – Fundamentals of Geology

An introduction to geology, Earth and planetary history, rock forming processes and geological time through the study of minerals, fossils, rocks and geological maps.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 15147 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 132 – Antarctica: Unfreezing the Continent

A broad introduction to Antarctica, including its history, exploration, weather, geology, fauna and management. Its role in the global climate system is emphasised. This course is primarily designed for non-science majors.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 9062 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 201 – Climate Change and New Zealand's Future

The Climate Change Research Institute in conjunction with the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences is offering this summer course. Designed for science and non-science students, this course provides a summary of current knowledge on climate change, the evidence and its uncertainties, and possible climate scenarios for the next 50 to 500 years. The course also discusses the influence of climate change on NZ’s society, economy and environment, and governmental strategies for adaptation and mitigation. The course is taught by staff from VUW, NIWA (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited), Ministry of the Environment, and Public Policy Research.

20 pts • (P) 30 points

3/3 • CRN 11341 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 202 – Sedimentology and Palaeontology

An introduction to features of sedimentary strata and fossils that form the basis for interpreting the geological history of a region from field observations and drill cores. The course includes flow channel studies of sediment movement in the laboratory, and a weekend field trip to gain experience in describing sedimentary strata and collecting fossils for subsequent study.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

1/3 • CRN 15137 • Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 203 – Earth Structures and Deformation

An introduction to the fields of structural geology, tectonics and solid earth geophysics with the goal of describing the structure of the earth and the mechanisms by which it deforms. The laboratory component emphasises modern field-based methods of collecting, processing and analysing geological and geophysical data.

20 pts • (P) (ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent) OR (ESCI 112 (or 111), MATH 142)

1/3 • CRN 15141 • Wed 1-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 204 – Petrology and Microscopy

This course examines all common major rock types and introduces crystallography as it pertains to optical mineralogy, with examples of a variety of common minerals and rocks in hand sample and under the microscope. The course covers the origins of common minerals and rocks and the conditions and processes that form them.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

2/3 • CRN 15138 • Tue, Thu 9-12 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 241 – Introductory Field Geology

An introduction to field techniques in geology held at the Geology department's field station at Onekaka, near Takaka, Northwest Nelson. In 2020 this field course is offered 22-29 February 2020, and/or 11-18 April 2020 (depending on enrolments/staff availability), and/or 18-25 April 2020 (also depending on enrolments/staff availability). Students will be instructed to sign up for one of these offerings.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

block dates/3 • CRN 17287 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 301 – Global Change: Earth Processes and History

A study of modern and past Earth environments and the key processes that have shaped them. This course focuses on understanding and interpreting evidence from the geological record for environmental change and using this knowledge to help predict future variability, with specific focus on Antarctica, Southwest Pacific and New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 202; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further points from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193); (C) ESCI 341 or GEOG 323

1/3 • CRN 15139 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 302 – Tectonics and Structural Geology

An introduction to the fundamental concepts, principles and methods in global tectonics and structural geology. The laboratory part of the course emphasises practical methods of structural analysis and interpretation based on outcrop, microscopic and geophysical data sets. It includes two all-day field trips.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 203, 341, 342; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193); (X) ESCI 340

2/3 • CRN 15145 • Mon, Thu 12-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 303 – Petrology and Geochemistry

The course introduces fundamental concepts, principles and methods in geochemistry and the application of geochemical tools to geochronology, igneous, metamorphic rocks and processes. The formation, classification and geochemical behaviour of elements, isotopes and anaylytical methods in geochemistry. The application of geochemical tools is examined and the principles of geochronology applied.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 204; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 15140 • Mon, Fri 9-12 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 304 – Petroleum Geology

This course introduces all aspects of the composition, origin and accumulation of hydrocarbons and the main exploration procedures and analytical techniques. It covers concepts such as play and sequence stratigraphy, before focusing on more detailed aspects of reservoir and seal types. Types of petroleum accumulation are described, ranging from standard oil and gas, to unconventional accumulations such as gas hydrates and shale oil and gas. Carbon capture and storage are also introduced along with discussion of issues such as fracking and the future of oil and gas. Practical work comprises exercises that introduce petroleum analytical techniques and are designed to foster an understanding of how exploration proceeds.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 301; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

Not offered in 2020

ESCI 305 – Applied Geophysics

This course covers the use of geophysical data acquisition, processing and interpretation for exploring the Earth's interior. Topics include gravity, electrical and magnetic surveying and the fields of simple bodies, refraction seismology, reflection survey data interpretation, the use of GPS for surveying and geodesy, and the use of surface waves for determination of shear wave velocities for engineering and seismic hazard purposes.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 15146 • ^ Mon, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 341 – Sedimentary Field Geology

Field sedimentary mapping in the hills east of Martinborough, covering the basics of mapping sedimentary sequences in an area of simple deformation. A map, cross- section and stratigraphic columns are prepared and an environmental analysis of the section is produced in the field. Only one stream will be offered in 2020. This will run from 12-19 February 2020. Students will be required to attend a half-day workshop on 10 February 2020 in CO304.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 241; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 28413 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 342 – Structural Field Geology

Field mapping and analysis of geological structures, including folds, thrust and active strike-slip faults. Students measure structural data, produce maps and cross-sections of an area on the Kaikoura coast, South Island, which provides a dramatic window into the tectonic evolution of NZ's landmass over the last 100 million years. Only one stream will be offered in 2020. This will run from 21-28 February 2020. All students will be required to attend a half-day workshop on 31 January 2020.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 203, 241; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 15142 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 343 – Volcanic Field Geology

Methods and techniques for studying volcanic geology in the field. This course runs from Whakapapa in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) of the central North Island. It examines the products of andesite and basalt eruptions from the Tongariro National Park volcanoes and some rhyolitic products of Taupo volcano. The course takes place in the mid-trimester break (18-25 April 2020).

10 pts • (P) ESCI 204, 241; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 17289 • ^ [Kelburn]

lab, tut tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 344 – Field Geophysics

Methods and techniques for field geophysical surveys. Also taught as GPHS 344. This field trip is held in the mid- trimester break (13-17 April 2020) along with supporting lectures.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (C) ESCI 305

block dates/3 • CRN 17288 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 349 – Earth Sciences – International Field Course

This international field course in earth sciences aims to examine key geographical, geological and/or geophysical localities. The course will offer a variable but unique insight, understanding and experience of earth science in the field beyond that which already exists in New Zealand. This course is offered in alternate years and will run in the USA from 18 November 2019 to 18 December 2019. Numbers are limited, apply by 1 April 2019. An extra fee beyond that for the course, covering travel and subsistence costs applies and is to be met by the student.

20 pts • (P) 60 points of 200-level ESCI or GEOG including either ESCI 241 or GEOG 223; (X) ESCI 449

Not offered in 2020

Econometrics

See also Economics

QUAN 102 – Statistics for Business

An introduction to techniques useful in business research or practice. Topics include sampling, graphs and diagrams, measures of location and dispersion, correlation and simple regression, probability, estimation and hypothesis testing. Note: QUAN 102 CRNs 1482, 5010, 7212 have lectures and tutorials at Kelburn; CRNs 4501, 16016, 32186 are online with tutorials at Kelburn campus. CRNs 17433 and 17434 are for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts • (X) MATH 277, STAT 193

1/3 • CRN 1482 • (L1) Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 4501 • (L2) tba [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 5010 • (L3) Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 16016 • (L5) tba [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 7212 • (L4) Mon, Tue, Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 32186 • (L8) tba [Kelburn]

tut tba

QUAN 103 – Introductory Maths for Business

An introduction to mathematics with applications in business: basic algebra, functions, introductory calculus, financial mathematics, vectors, matrices and linear programming.

15 pts • (X) MATH 132, 141, 142, 151, QUAN 111

Not offered in 2020

QUAN 111 – Mathematics for Economics and Finance

Mathematical methods appropriate for study of economics and finance: set theory, functions, calculus of functions of one or several variables, financial mathematics, vectors, matrices and systems of linear equations. Note: QUAN 111, CRN 15973 is for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts • (X) MATH 141/142 and 151

1/3 • CRN 6107 • Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 6469 • Tue, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

QUAN 201 – Introduction to Econometrics

The course focuses on the estimation and interpretation of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models. The OLS assumptions and their implications are discussed. The methods learned are applied to real data.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 (or MATH 141/142, 151);

1/3 • CRN 1483 • Tue, Fri 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 32036 • Tue, Thu 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

QUAN 202 – Business and Economic Forecasting

Basic concepts of forecasting; smoothing and seasonal adjustment, forecasting via adaptive procedures, ARIMA models, and the use of explanatory variables, the evaluation and combination of forecasts. Computer software is used to illustrate all aspects of the course.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

Not offered in 2020

QUAN 203 – Quantitative Methods for Economics and Finance

Quantitative methods for advanced study in economics and finance. Topics include calculus of functions of several variables; matrices and quadratic forms; distribution theory; expectations, with applications to problems in economics and finance.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151); (X) MATH 277

2/3 • CRN 13095 • Thu, Fri 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

Economics

ECON 130 – Microeconomic Principles

An introduction to economic principles and their application to issues facing households, businesses and government in the New Zealand economy and the international economic environment. Note: CRNs 17450 and 15517 are for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts • (X) ECON 113

1/3 • CRN 10034 • (L1) Wed, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 10035 • (L2) Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 10036 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 8827 • Mon, Wed, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ECON 141 – Macroeconomic Principles

An introduction to macroeconomics, including fiscal and monetary policies, the international sector, and analysis of income-expenditure, IS-MPR and aggregate demand-aggregate supply models.

15 pts • (X) ECON 140

1/3 • CRN 27005 • Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27008 • Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ECON 201 – Intermediate Microeconomics

This course in intermediate microeconomic analysis includes demand theory and applications of consumer behaviour, analysis of market structures, strategic behaviour, introductory welfare economics and analysis of public goods and externalities.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130; QUAN 111 (or MATH 141/142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 1194 • Mon, Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 202 – Open-economy Macroeconomics

Applications of an open economy macroeconomic model to macroeconomic issues and policy, including the interdependence of macroeconomic activity and markets, the roles of expectations variables and other dynamic adjustment mechanisms, the significance of international events, exchange rate regimes, inflation, unemployment.

15 pts • (P) ECON 141 (or 140)

2/3 • CRN 1196 • Wed, Fri 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 211 – Industrial Organisation

Economic theory combines with empirical evidence in the study of the organisation of firms, industries and markets. The course draws on game theory, transaction cost analysis, information theory and the application of economics to legal issues.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130; QUAN111 or (MATH 141/142, 151); (X) ECON 328

Not offered in 2020

ECON 212 – Macroeconomics: Growth, Stability and Crises

An introduction to dynamic macroeconomic processes and recurrent problems, including the recent global instability. Themes covered include the theory of economic growth, productivity, business cycle theory and the causes of banking crises, exchange rates and the international transmission of these processes.

15 pts • (P) ECON 141 (or 140)

Not offered in 2020

ECON 301 – Econometrics

This course covers the following topics in econometric methods: Ordinary Least Squares (with matrix algebra); Generalised Least Squares; Instrumental Variables estimation; Maximum Likelihood estimation; Binary Response and Limited Dependent Variables models; Panel Data models.

15 pts • (P) QUAN 201; QUAN 203 (or MATH 277); one of (ECON 201, 202, FINA 201, 202); (X) QUAN 301

2/3 • CRN 18060 • Mon, Wed 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

ECON 303 – Applied Econometrics

This course focuses on important classical and contemporary econometric techniques and their empirical applications. Empirical applications may relate to topics from labour or health economics, industrial organisation, macroeconomics or international trade.

15 pts • (P) QUAN 201

2/3 • CRN 18061 • Wed, Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

ECON 305 – Advanced Macroeconomics

Causes and consequences of Economic Growth, viewed both narrowly in terms of GDP, and more broadly in terms of the progress of societies. The roles of monetary and fiscal policy in shaping Macroeconomic outcomes. Individual, in-depth anlysis of these issues for a selected economy.

15 pts • (P) ECON 202, QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 1203 • Tue, Thu 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 307 – Public Sector Economics

The economic analysis of the role of the state, covering market failure and government failure and related policy instruments, with applications in the areas of taxation, social security and education.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201 or (ECON 130, PUBL 203/209); (X) PUBL 303

2/3 • CRN 19742 • Tue, Thu 8.30-9.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 309 – International Economics

Theories of international specialisation; trade and growth with consideration given to both the postive and normative effects of government policies relating to international trade. The course will also include an introduction to theories of current accounts and determinants of exchange rates in relations to international financial policies.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201, 202

1/3 • CRN 1206 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 312 – Macroeconomics: Growth, Stability and Crises

An introduction to dynamic macroeconomic processes and recurrent problems, including global instability. Themes covered include the theory of economic growth, productivity, business cycle theory, the causes of financial crises, the international transmission of these processes, and the role of government policy. This course is first taught in 2021.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201, 202; (X) ECON 212

Not offered in 2020

ECON 314 – Game Theory

This course introduces and develops game theory and its applications.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201

1/3 • CRN 1210 • Tue, Thu 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 328 – Industrial Organisation

Economic theory combines with empirical evidence in the study of the organisation of firms, industries and markets. The course draws on game theory, transaction cost analysis, information theory and the application of economics to legal issues. This course is first offered in 2021.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201; (X) ECON 211

Not offered in 2020

ECON 330 – Law and Economics

An introduction to the economic analysis of law and legal institutions. The course covers issues in the economic analysis of tort law, property law, contract law, criminal law, litigation and settlement, as well as corporate and antitrust law.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 15 pts from (COML/ECON 201-299 or LAWS 201-289); (X) LAWS 335

2/3 • CRN 7717 • Mon 8.30-9.30 [Pipitea], Tue 8.30-9.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 333 – Labour Economics

The determinants of wages and employment; education and training; immigration; inequality and discrimination; incentives, careers and contracts; collective bargaining; economic aspects of employment law; unemployment and labour market policies.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201; QUAN 102 or MATH 177 or STAT 193

1/3 • CRN 1213 • Wed, Fri 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 338 – Monetary Economics

The role of money in various issues in macroeconomics, with particular attention to monetary theory and its policy implications. Topics include inflation, international monetary systems, capital, central banking, banking theory, and government debt.

15 pts • (P) ECON 202/212; QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151); (X) MOFI 303

Not offered in 2020

ECON 339 – Information Economics

The economics of information and incentives. Topics covered include efficiency; complete and incomplete verifiability; uncertainty, expected utility and insurance, moral hazard; selection, screening and lemons; auctions.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201

Not offered in 2020

ECON 340 – Environmental and Resource Economics

Topics include property rights and transactions costs; environmental externalities and associated missing markets; valuation of environmental resources; irreversibility and its economic implications under uncertainty; economics of pollution control; economics of natural resource use; decision-making under New Zealand's Resource Management Act.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201

1/3 • CRN 18063 • Mon, Wed 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

ECON 341 – Public Choice and Social Welfare

An introduction to the field of political economy. Topics include the behaviour of voters, candidates, legislatures, interest groups, political parties, and the media; distortion of political decisions; the optimal design and evolution of political institutions.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201; QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

Not offered in 2020

ECON 350 – Special Topic: Development Economics

This course highlights important empirical facts concerning growth and development in various countries at different development stages. Fundamental growth theory is then delivered. Topics vary, but may include industrial transformation, urbanization and regional development, R&D and innovation, labour market development, demographic transition, institutional development, and global development.

15 pts • (P) ECON201, 202

2/3 • CRN 23143 • Mon, Thu 4.30-5.30pm [Pipitea]

ECON 361 – Disasters and Economic Policy

The economic aspects of disaster management and policy, including these topics: the economic history of natural disasters; the research literature on the economics of natural disasters; poverty and vulnerability, insurance, risk transfer, cost benefit of mitigation, and other related topics.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 29066 • Tue, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

Education

EDUC 101 – Education, Society and Culture

This interdisciplinary course is an introduction to the relationship between education, society and change. It analyses the ways in which political and cultural beliefs influence children’s and young people’s experiences of education in multiple settings with a particular focus on Aotearoa New Zealand and the Oceania region.

20 pts • (X) EPOL 181, FEDU 101, KURA 101

1/3 • CRN 28205 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 115 – The Discovery of Early Childhood

An introduction to the history and philosophies underpinning early childhood care and education in Europe, the United States and New Zealand from the 18th century to the present day.

15 pts • (X) EPOL 113

1/3 • CRN 28020 • Thu 1-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 116 – Understanding Young Children

An introduction to past and present theories of child development with a particular focus on understanding the theoretical context out of which contemporary understandings of how young children learn and develop have emerged.

15 pts • (X) EPSY 113

1/3 • CRN 28021 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 117 – Motivation and Grit

Why do you do the things you do? Why are some activities more effective than others in trying to achieve goals? What is grit and how does it relate to motivation? This course will address all of these questions and will help students understand what affects peoples’ motivation. This course is taught online and can only be added until 13 November 2019.

20 pts

3/3 • CRN 29044 • [Distance (NZ)]

EDUC 136 – Professional knowledge for Mathematics Education

How do children learn mathematics and how can teachers promote mathematical learning and thinking? This course explores specialised content knowledge; a knowledge of mathematical concepts essential for the effective teaching of mathematics. Learning will be based around the pedagogies promoted in New Zealand curriculum documents. This course is particularly relevant for students considering enrolling in a teaching qualification upon completion of their undergraduate degree.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 30048 • Wed 11-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

EDUC 141 – Human Development and Learning

This course takes a lifespan approach to examining how people develop and learn from birth to death. It explores key milestones and changes in physical, cognitive, emotional and social development; and critically examines a range of factors and contexts that shape development and learning.

20 pts • (X) EPSY 141, FEDU 101

1/3 • CRN 28197 • Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 28198 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 215 – The Early Years Debates

The object of the course is to examine current issues and debates in both local and international contexts, and to appraise the diverse theoretical models of early years care and education linked to course content across the programme.

15 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 101,115, 116 or 142) (X) EPOL 215

1/3 • CRN 28024 • Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 221 – Youth, Society and Education

This course examines the ways in which young people create meaning in their lives and in their school environments. It explores the influences that shape their understandings of the world and their experiences of being young in a rapidly changing society.

20 pts • (P) 20, 100 level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA/SOSC pts; (X) EPOL 281

1/3 • CRN 28199 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 222 – Educational Inquiry

This course provides an introducation to key concepts, processes and methodological approaches to educational research. The emphasis of the course is on building research literacy and developing basic research skills.

20 pts • (P) 20 EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA pts

Not offered in 2020

EDUC 223 – Education, Ethnicity and Culture

An examination of the underlying concepts in indigenous education and the theories that inform current research practice. Particular emphasis is given to theories of ethnicity, culture, indigeneity and colonisation and their application to the New Zealand context.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level EDUC/EPSY/EPOL/FEDU/KURA/MAOR/PASI pts; (X) KURA 242

2/3 • CRN 28201 • Tue 12-2pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 224 – Pacific Nations Education

The course examines concepts, issues and trends in Pacific Nations Education with particular reference to the education of Pacific peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand and indigenous education systems in the Pacific.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA/MAOR/PASI pts; (X) KURA 241

2/3 • CRN 28206 • Wed 1-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 243 – Learning and Motivation

This course examines psychological principles of learning and motivation in educational contexts. Key theories and evidence on learning and motivation are evaluated.

20 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 116, 141, EPSY 113, 141, PSYC 121, 122); (X) EPSY 243

1/3 • CRN 28202 • Mon 3-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 244 – Issues in Child and Adolescent Development

This course examines child and adolescent development within an applied developmental psychology framework. Key theories and evidence on a range of issues and challenges that influence child and adolescent development is evaluated.

20 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 116, 141, EPSY 113, 141, PSYC 121, 122); (X) EPSY 244

2/3 • CRN 28203 • Mon 9-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

EDUC 321 – The Politics of Education

This course examines the contemporary theoretical and policy debates in the politics of education. These debates are used to shed light on the relationship between globalising processes, the State, education and individuals.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level EDUC pts;

1/3 • CRN 28204 • Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 322 – Multi-ethnic Education

This course examines concepts, issues and trends in multi-ethnic education.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/KURA/ANTH/HIST MAOR/POLS/SOSC pts; (X) KURA 341

1/3 • CRN 28208 • Mon 10-12 [Kelburn], Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 323 – Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Education Aotearoa

This course will investigate the drive by various indigenous groups to be more self-determining through education. An interdisciplinary focus is taken. The course will discuss contemporary themes such as indigenous identities, the impact of globalisation and the self-determination of indigenous peoples.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including 20 EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/KURA pts; (X) KURA 342

2/3 • CRN 28209 • Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 341 – Learning Environments

How do we regulate our thoughts, feelings, and behaviours to reach our goals in formal and informal learning settings? How do learning environments influence our ability to self-regulate and self-control, and how can we design learning environments that support engagement and learning? The course will address these questions. In so doing, it will help students apply theory and research evidence to formulate strategies that support effective self-regulation and self-control in learning environments.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level pts including 20 approved EDUC/EPSY/KURA pts; (X) EPSY 341

2/3 • CRN 28210 • Tue 2-5pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 342 – Exceptional Learners: Special Education

This course examines psychological and educational aspects of developmental and physical disabilities. Evidence on developmental and physical disabilities is evaluated.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including one of EDUC 243, 244; EPSY 243, 244); (X) EPSY 342

1/3 • CRN 28211 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EDUC 343 – Youth and Life Challenges

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the developmental, psychological and sociological factors and contexts that impact on the development, risk, resilience and wellbeing of young people. It also focuses on young people’s experiences of life challenges and the role of education in prevention, intervention and supporting youth.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including one of EDUC 243, 244, EPSY 243, 244); (X) EPSY 343

1/3 • CRN 28212 • Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

Education (Study Abroad)

EDUC 101 – Education, Society and Culture

This interdisciplinary course is an introduction to the relationship between education, society and change. It analyses the ways in which political and cultural beliefs influence children’s and young people’s experiences of education in multiple settings with a particular focus on Aotearoa New Zealand and the Oceania region.

20 pts • (X) EPOL 181, FEDU 101, KURA 101

1/3 • CRN 28205 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 115 – The Discovery of Early Childhood

An introduction to the history and philosophies underpinning early childhood care and education in Europe, the United States and New Zealand from the 18th century to the present day.

15 pts • (X) EPOL 113

1/3 • CRN 28020 • Thu 1-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 116 – Understanding Young Children

An introduction to past and present theories of child development with a particular focus on understanding the theoretical context out of which contemporary understandings of how young children learn and develop have emerged.

15 pts • (X) EPSY 113

1/3 • CRN 28021 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 141 – Human Development and Learning

This course takes a lifespan approach to examining how people develop and learn from birth to death. It explores key milestones and changes in physical, cognitive, emotional and social development; and critically examines a range of factors and contexts that shape development and learning.

20 pts • (X) EPSY 141, FEDU 101

1/3 • CRN 28197 • Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 28198 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

PSYC 121 – Introduction to Psychology 1

This course provides an introduction to methods of research in psychology, social processes, individual differences, abnormal behaviour, human development and language.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 1421 • (L1) Mon, Tue, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 4692 • (L2) Mon, Tue, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 28005 • (L3) Mon, Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

PSYC 122 – Introduction to Psychology 2

This course provides an introduction to the biological basis of behaviour, psychophysics, perception, attention, learning, memory and applied psychology.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 1423 • (L1) Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 4056 • (L2) Mon, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 28006 • (L3) Mon, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

STAT 193 – Statistics in Practice

An applied statistics course for students who will be advancing in other disciplines as well as those majoring in Statistics. It is particularly suitable for students majoring in Biological Science subjects, Geography, Linguistics, Health, Psychology and social sciences such as Education and is also suitable for students taking BCom subjects. Offered as 2 streams in the first trimester (CRNs 1791 & 11333) and the second trimester (CRNs 4442 & 6164). Offered in the third trimester (CRN 17069).

15 pts • (X) MATH 277, QUAN 102

1/3 • CRN 1791 • (L3) Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 11333 • (L4) Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 4442 • (L1) Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 6164 • (L2) Tue, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 17069 • Tue, Thu, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

EDUC 215 – The Early Years Debates

The object of the course is to examine current issues and debates in both local and international contexts, and to appraise the diverse theoretical models of early years care and education linked to course content across the programme.

15 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 101,115, 116 or 142) (X) EPOL 215

1/3 • CRN 28024 • Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 221 – Youth, Society and Education

This course examines the ways in which young people create meaning in their lives and in their school environments. It explores the influences that shape their understandings of the world and their experiences of being young in a rapidly changing society.

20 pts • (P) 20, 100 level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA/SOSC pts; (X) EPOL 281

1/3 • CRN 28199 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 222 – Educational Inquiry

This course provides an introducation to key concepts, processes and methodological approaches to educational research. The emphasis of the course is on building research literacy and developing basic research skills.

20 pts • (P) 20 EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA pts

Not offered in 2020

EDUC 223 – Education, Ethnicity and Culture

An examination of the underlying concepts in indigenous education and the theories that inform current research practice. Particular emphasis is given to theories of ethnicity, culture, indigeneity and colonisation and their application to the New Zealand context.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level EDUC/EPSY/EPOL/FEDU/KURA/MAOR/PASI pts; (X) KURA 242

2/3 • CRN 28201 • Tue 12-2pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 224 – Pacific Nations Education

The course examines concepts, issues and trends in Pacific Nations Education with particular reference to the education of Pacific peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand and indigenous education systems in the Pacific.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA/MAOR/PASI pts; (X) KURA 241

2/3 • CRN 28206 • Wed 1-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 243 – Learning and Motivation

This course examines psychological principles of learning and motivation in educational contexts. Key theories and evidence on learning and motivation are evaluated.

20 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 116, 141, EPSY 113, 141, PSYC 121, 122); (X) EPSY 243

1/3 • CRN 28202 • Mon 3-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 244 – Issues in Child and Adolescent Development

This course examines child and adolescent development within an applied developmental psychology framework. Key theories and evidence on a range of issues and challenges that influence child and adolescent development is evaluated.

20 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 116, 141, EPSY 113, 141, PSYC 121, 122); (X) EPSY 244

2/3 • CRN 28203 • Mon 9-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

LALS 201 – Understanding Language Learning and Teaching

This course examines the processes involved in learning first and second/foreign languages, including the study of bilingualism, focusing on the implications for language learners and teachers. The course is useful for students who wish to optimise their own language learning practices and/or pursue a career in language education.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) LING 223

1/3 • CRN 28266 • Mon, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

TSOL 203 – Text and Cultural Context

The course explores the language demands of written and spoken genres at school, as well as how the teacher can meet these demands. The course considers the language of schooling and the learning and teaching of languages across cultural contexts.

20 pts • (P) 40 points; (X) ALIN 302

2/3 • CRN 28268 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 321 – The Politics of Education

This course examines the contemporary theoretical and policy debates in the politics of education. These debates are used to shed light on the relationship between globalising processes, the State, education and individuals.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level EDUC pts;

1/3 • CRN 28204 • Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 322 – Multi-ethnic Education

This course examines concepts, issues and trends in multi-ethnic education.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/KURA/ANTH/HIST MAOR/POLS/SOSC pts; (X) KURA 341

1/3 • CRN 28208 • Mon 10-12 [Kelburn], Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 323 – Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Education Aotearoa

This course will investigate the drive by various indigenous groups to be more self-determining through education. An interdisciplinary focus is taken. The course will discuss contemporary themes such as indigenous identities, the impact of globalisation and the self-determination of indigenous peoples.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including 20 EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/KURA pts; (X) KURA 342

2/3 • CRN 28209 • Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 341 – Learning Environments

How do we regulate our thoughts, feelings, and behaviours to reach our goals in formal and informal learning settings? How do learning environments influence our ability to self-regulate and self-control, and how can we design learning environments that support engagement and learning? The course will address these questions. In so doing, it will help students apply theory and research evidence to formulate strategies that support effective self-regulation and self-control in learning environments.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level pts including 20 approved EDUC/EPSY/KURA pts; (X) EPSY 341

2/3 • CRN 28210 • Tue 2-5pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 342 – Exceptional Learners: Special Education

This course examines psychological and educational aspects of developmental and physical disabilities. Evidence on developmental and physical disabilities is evaluated.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including one of EDUC 243, 244; EPSY 243, 244); (X) EPSY 342

1/3 • CRN 28211 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EDUC 343 – Youth and Life Challenges

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the developmental, psychological and sociological factors and contexts that impact on the development, risk, resilience and wellbeing of young people. It also focuses on young people’s experiences of life challenges and the role of education in prevention, intervention and supporting youth.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including one of EDUC 243, 244, EPSY 243, 244); (X) EPSY 343

1/3 • CRN 28212 • Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

TSOL 301 – Language Teaching: Principles to Practice

This course aims to develop an applied understanding of principles for language teaching and learning. It explores materials selection and design, and procedures and techniques for teaching language lessons, focusing on teaching the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Course members will participate in peer teaching and peer observation.

20 pts • (P) LALS201 and TSOL 202 or 203; 20 pts in language other than English or an equivalent second language learning experience; (X) ALIN 201

1/3 • CRN 28269 • Tue 4-6pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

Education and Psychology

PSYC 121 – Introduction to Psychology 1

This course provides an introduction to methods of research in psychology, social processes, individual differences, abnormal behaviour, human development and language.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 1421 • (L1) Mon, Tue, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 4692 • (L2) Mon, Tue, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 28005 • (L3) Mon, Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

PSYC 122 – Introduction to Psychology 2

This course provides an introduction to the biological basis of behaviour, psychophysics, perception, attention, learning, memory and applied psychology.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 1423 • (L1) Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 4056 • (L2) Mon, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 28006 • (L3) Mon, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

PSYC 232 – Research Methods in Psychology

This course covers fundamentals of research methods and data analysis as they apply to psychology. Topics covered include: experimental design; a comparison of quantitative and qualitative research; survey design; subject selection; and observational methodology. In addition several commonly used statistical techniques are described. The laboratory component involves hands-on experience with several data collection techniques as well as several statistical techniques.

15 pts • (P) PSYC 121 or 122; STAT 193 (or MATH 177 or QUAN 102); (X) PSYC 325

1/3 • CRN 7543 • (L1) Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 15370 • (L2) Tue, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

PSYC 325 – Advanced Research Methods in Psychology

The aim of the class is to work with students so that they have, at the end of the class, a sound foundation with which they can read and understand published psychological research and/or begin to conduct supervised research in any of several different areas of psychology.

15 pts • (P) PSYC 232, 30 further 200-level PSYC points, STAT 193 (or MATH 177 or QUAN 102)

2/3 • CRN 10007 • Mon, Wed, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

Electronic and Computer System Engineering

See also Computer Science and Physics

ENGR 101 – Engineering Technology

This course provides a general introduction to the fundamental technical concepts needed to understand the design and engineering of electronic, mechatronic, networked and software systems. Experience is gained in basic engineering practice, with assembly and testing of basic hardware, software and networked systems, and construction of a personal computer.

15 pts • (P) enrolment in BE(Hons)

1/3 • CRN 15243 • Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Wed, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ENGR 110 – Engineering Design

This course addresses the engineering design process through a collection of engineering projects that requre a range of technologies and design techniques. Sustainability will be an important component of the course, with some of the projects addressing technology and design for sustainable engineering.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102, ENGR 101 (X) ENGR 111

2/3 • CRN 26051 • Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 111 – Introduction to Renewable Energy Systems

This course will provide an overview of the role of energy systems in sustainability, and the development trends, past and future, of different technologies. The ways in which the technologies influence industry, government, and society will be examined from a range of different perspectives. Students will also gain practical skills in energy generation and utilisation through a range of experiments, as well as skills in modelling renewable energy systems for different contexts.

15 pts • (X) ENGR 110 from 2019

2/3 • CRN 30093 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 121 – Engineering Mathematics Foundations

An introduction to the range of mathematical techniques employed by engineers, including functions and calculus, linear algebra and vector geometry, probability and statistics. There is an emphasis on applications and modelling.

15 pts • (P) 16 AS credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics (or equivalent) or MATH 132; (X) Any pair (MATH 141/QUAN 111, MATH 151/161/177)

1/3 • CRN 26052 • Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 31158 • Mon, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENGR 122 – Engineering Mathematics with Calculus

Further mathematical techniques employed by electronic and computer systems engineers, with emphasis on methods of calculus, differential equations and linear Algebra. There is an emphasis on engineering applications and use of software.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 or MATH 141; (X) the pair (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 26053 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGR 123 – Engineering Mathematics with Logic and Statistics

Mathematical techniques employed by network and software engineers, including methods of combinatorics, logic, probability and decision theory. The course emphasises engineering applications of these techniques.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 (X) the pair MATH 161, (MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193);

2/3 • CRN 27044 • Mon, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31159 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-2pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 141 – Engineering Science

This course covers key topics in physics, and to a lesser extent chemistry, which are relevant to many aspects of Electronic and Software Engineering. Topics include: forms and use of energy; introductory atomic theory; exploitation of chemical energy; understanding and using heat; waves and their properties. Students will obtain an appreciation for quantitative scientific reasoning, practise problem solving skills and then develop a better understanding of the role of fundamental physical laws across engineering disciplines.

15 pts • (P) 16 credits of NCEA Level 3 mathematics or equivalent

1/3 • CRN 30094 • Mon, Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 142 – Engineering Physics for Electronics and Computer Systems

Physics theory and practice relevant to electronics and computer systems engineering. Topics covered will include electrostatics (charge, force, field, potential), magnetic field and force, DC and AC circuits, electromagnetic induction and other selected topics. Lectures, assignments and laboratory work will all focus on the application of physics to engineering situations.

15 pts • (P) either ENGR 141 and (ENGR 121 or MATH 141) or approved levels of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Physics and Calculus or equivalent; (X) PHYS 115

2/3 • CRN 27045 • Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 202 – Digital Electronics

A practically oriented introduction to the design and construction of digital electronic instruments. The course provides a foundation in binary arithmetic and Boolean algebra, logic gates and families, combinational and sequential logic design, microprocessor architectures, programming and interfacing, and conversions of digital and analogue signals.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 101 or PHYS 115; 15 pts from (ENGR 121, 122, 123, MATH 141, 142, 151, 161) (X) PHYS 234

1/3 • CRN 18509 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn], Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 203 – Analogue Circuits and Systems

This course introduces electrical circuit analysis. Topics covered include circuit theorems, operational amplifiers circuits. It introduces the Laplace transform as an analysis tool.

15 pts • (P) MATH 142 or ENGR 122; ENGR 142 or PHYS 115; (X) PHYS 235

1/3 • CRN 18510 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 204 – Electronic Design

This course is a practically oriented introduction to fundamental electronic devices and their circuit applications. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals, diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 122 or MATH 142; ENGR 142 or PHYS 115; (X) PHYS 235, (ECEN 201 and ECEN 203 prior to 2016)

2/3 • CRN 28324 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 220 – Signals and Systems

The course introduces analysis techniques for signals and linear time-invariant systems. It includes Discrete and Continuous Fourier transform techniques, with applications to circuit analysis and communication systems.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121, 122) or (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 18511 • Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 201 – Engineering in Context

This course addresses the research, analysis, critical and creative thinking skills embodied in written and oral communication which professional engineers are expected to display in the workplace. While addressing these aspects, the course at the same time develops the personal and interpersonal skills required to work effectively as part of a team in an engineering context.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 101, 110 and 45 further points from Part 1 of the BE(Hons) schedule

2/3 • CRN 29036 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 240 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ENGR 241 – Directed Individual Study

30 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ENGR 291 – Work Experience Preparation

A range of activities in preparation for the work experience requirement for the BE(Hons).

0 pts • (P) ENGR 101, admission to part 2 of the BE(Hons)

1+2/3 • CRN 18717 • tba [Kelburn]

ECEN 301 – Embedded Systems

This course details how embedded controllers can be used to solve a number of real-world engineering problems. The main emphasis is on 8-bit microprocessors, logic systems to support them and techniques to interface them with the physical world. Specific topics include microcontrollers, sensors, actuators, signal conditioning, filters, analogue to digital conversion, systems analysis and introductory control. Practical experience is gained through the use of programming a microcontroller in a high level language and interfacing it to real-world systems.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 202, 203 (X) PHYS 340

2/3 • CRN 18512 • Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-3pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 302 – Integrated Digital Electronics

Fundamentals of IC processing. Transistor based logic design using gates and switches, nMOS, CMOS, GaAs MESFET, BiCMOS logic design. Combinatoric arrays, sequential design, memory architectures, design for testability and observability. VLSI design using FPGAs.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 202 (or PHYS 234), ECEN 204

2/3 • CRN 18513 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 11-1pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 303 – Analogue Electronics

This course expands on ECEN 201, with an emphasis on developing analogue circuit design skills and applying them to the design of electronic instrumentation. The course covers to an advanced level, operational amplifier imperfections, noise, feedback and stability and operational amplifier applications such as active filters, differential amplifiers and oscillators. In addition, the course provides an introduction to diodes and diode circuits, BJTs and BJT circuits used within operational amplifiers, linear and switching power supplies and high power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 203 (or PHYS 235); ECEN 204; (X) PHYS 341

1/3 • CRN 18514 • Mon, Tue, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

ECEN 310 – Communication Engineering

This course provides the student with an introduction to communication systems focusing on the physical layer of the OSI model. It covers both analog and digital modulation techniques, including baseband and passband signaling. Topics include matched filter receivers for additive noise channels and associated error rate performance, intersymbol interference and Nyquist pulse shaping. Also covered are fundamentals of wireless fading channels, an overview of synchronization and a brief introduction to advanced techniques such as MIMO, OFDM and CDMA.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 220; (X) CSEN 303

2/3 • CRN 18515 • Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ECEN 315 – Control Systems Engineering

This course presents the analysis and modelling of linear dynamic systems and the design of linear feedback controllers for such systems. There is a focus on electrical, mechanical and electromechanical systems and the dynamic response of these systems. Properties and advantages of feedback control systems and the design of such systems using various design techniques are covered, as well as the implementation of PID controllers.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 203 (or 220 prior to 2016); (X) PHYS 422

1/3 • CRN 18516 • Tue, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 320 – Introductory Signal Processing

This course builds on the material of ECEN 220, providing more detail on signal analysis and system design. Topics covered include orthogonality, Fourier series, Fourier transform, the autocorrelation function, fast Fourier transform, Z transform, linear systems, filter design, filter structures, modulation and noise.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 220 or MATH 244; (X) ECSE 420, PHYS 420

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 321 – Engineering Statistics

The course introduces the fundamentals of engineering statistics. Topics include probability mass and density functions, random variables and functions of random variables, confidence intervals, statistical tests, and regression, as applied to engineering problems.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121, 122) or (MATH 142, 151), 30 200-level ECEN pts

1/3 • CRN 29033 • Mon, Wed, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENGR 301 – Project Management

Project management including aspects of life cycle, requirements analysis, principles of design, project tasks and deliverables, contracts, feasibility analysis, cost estimation and cost/benefit analysis, project scheduling, critical path analysis, risk management, quality assurance, managing project resources, testing and delivery, maintenance, interpersonal communication, teamwork and project leadership.

15 pts • (P) Admission to Part 2 of the BE(Hons), ENGR 201 and 60 200-level pts from (CYBR, COMP, ECEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN)

1/3 • CRN 17178 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

ENGR 302 – Group Project

Students will work in teams on a project of modest complexity, practising teamwork, project planning, the development of interface specifications and testing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 301

2/3 • CRN 17179 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 340 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ENGR 341 – Directed Individual Study

30 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ENGR 391 – Practical Work Experience

A range of activities in preparation for the work experience requirement for the BE.

0 pts • (P) ENGR 291, admission to Part 2 of the BE(Hons)

1+2/3 • CRN 18718 • tba [Kelburn]

ECEN 403 – Advanced Electronics

Advanced analogue and digital electronics, design principles, transform methods of analysis, active and passive filters, oscillators, phase-locked loops, digital signal processors, digital synthesis, communication principles, RF design.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 303 (or PHYS 340); ECEN 220 or MATH 243 or 244; (X) PHYS 423

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 404 – Microfabricated Devices

The course will introduce students to the theory and practice of fabrication processes and techniques that can be used to produce electronic, electromechanical and optical devices with micron sized features. The operating principles of structures such as solar cells, energy harvesters, optical superlenses, metamaterials and microfluidic devices will be covered. The course will enable students to gain hands-on experience in the design, fabrication and characterisation of a range of these devices.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 303

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 405 – Power Electronics

The course covers the theory, design and application of power electronic circuits and the transformation and control of electrical energy.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 303 (or PHYS 340)

1/3 • CRN 18521 • Mon, Wed, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

ECEN 410 – Advanced Communications Engineering

The course covers advanced topics in physical layer wireless communications. It begins with a brief introduction to Information Theory, leading to the concept of channel capacity. Multiple antenna techniques for both single and multiple user communications are discussed, including diversity, space time coding and digital beamforming. Large scale systems and advanced channel models are discussed. Matlab system simulations are used throughout the course for evaluating the communication system performance.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 310

1/3 • CRN 18522 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 415 – Advanced Control Systems Engineering

This course builds on and extends the principles of modern control systems engineering introduced in ECEN 315 to enable students to develop mathematical models and use these to design optimal control systems for real-world multivariable engineering systems. Kalman filters and linear quadratic regulators will be introduced and the principles and benefits of modern model-based predictive control systems will be outlined. Methods will be developed for continuous time system descriptions but techniques for converting to discrete time descriptions and for designing controls for discrete time systems will also be presented.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 315 (or PHYS 422)

2/3 • CRN 18519 • Tue, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 421 – Advanced Signal Processing

The goal of ECEN 421 is to provide a geometric intuition to signal processing. This geometric point of view is a powerful tool for the understanding of signal processing techniques including Fourier transforms, sampling theorems, time-frequency analysis and wavelets. The course provides the mathematical depth and rigor that is necessary for the study of more advanced topics in signal processing, as well as providing the details of applications including image compression, audio coding, and mobile sensing.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 321, (X) PHYS 421, TECH 421

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 422 – Convex Optimisation

Convex optimisation problems are common in science, engineering and economics. The course teaches identifying and solving convex optimisation problems. It discusses convex sets and functions, linear and quadratic programs, semi-definite programming, and duality theory. It uses these concepts to solve practical optimisation problems.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 321, or ECEN 220 (prior to 2016), or ECEN 320 (in 2016)

2/3 • CRN 29035 • Tue, Wed, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

ECEN 425 – Advanced Mechatronic Engineering 1: Hardware and Control

This course provides an introduction to the techniques of mechatronics. It begins by covering the engineering concepts of compromise in the choice of sensors. It then covers basic signal conditioning and noise concepts, derivation of the transfer function and the output from a mechatronic system - specifically some form of actuator. The course continues with some specific ranging sensor circuits and applications, including practical implementation. Practical control systems for industrial plant and mechatronic systems are detailed, e.g. PID, dynamic response and stability. Students design and construct their own microcontroller development system. Mechatronic design considerations are discussed based on implementation through the SolidWorks CAD package.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 301 (or PHYS 340)

2/3 • CRN 18524 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 430 – Advanced Mechatronic Engineering 2: Intelligence and Design

This course provides a guide to advanced techniques in the field of Mechatronics. The course material studies the interaction between hardware, software and communication components as it relates to embedded systems. Robotics are frequently used to illustrate the mechatronic theory. Artificial Intelligence techniques are introduced as a practical method for addressing the complex interactions between the electronic, mechanical and software components. The course is very practically oriented and primarily uses project-based assessments. These include a robotic competition, real-world customer design, industrial design considerations (in collaboration with the School of Design) and cognitive robotics.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 301 (or PHYS 340)

1/3 • CRN 18576 • Tue, Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ECEN 431 – Musical Robotics

This course is a project-based course that incorporates a music theme in the design and construction of a novel robotic musical instrument. The necessary fundamentals of the appropriate music theory are introduced, and then students are guided in a project-based learning style to develop an actuator and sensor rich robotic device that can play a suitable music score. Students are evaluated on their design, construction, testing and demonstration of this robotic device.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 301 (X) ECEN 427 in 2017-2018

2/3 • CRN 31155 • tba [Kelburn]

ENGR 401 – Professional Practice

This course will prepare student's expectations for many of the events and situations they are likely to meet in the professional working world. This includes: codes of conduct, as determined by professional bodies and company practices; ethical behaviour, as found in the workplace and dictated by company practices; critical thinking and people issues, as relevant in the workplace and in company practice.

15 pts • (P) 75 300-level pts from the BE(Hons) schedule including ENGR 301, 302

1/3 • CRN 18690 • Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 440 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from CGRA, COMP, CYBR, ECEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN; Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 26008 • [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27189 • [Kelburn]

ENGR 441 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from CGRA, COMP, CYBR, ECEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN; Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 26239 • [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 26009 • [Kelburn]

ENGR 489 – Engineering Project

Students will work on an individual project of a complex nature in order to develop a solution to an engineering problem. In addition to the technical engineering development work, the project may require consideration of issues such as customer specifications, cost analysis, IP and product testing and delivery. Students will be required to give an oral and a poster presentation as well as a final report on their project.

30 pts • (P) as for ENGR 401

1+2/3 • CRN 18688 • Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 491 – Professional Work Experience

Completion of the work experience requirement for the BE.

0 pts • (P) ENGR 391, 401

1+2+3/3 • CRN 18701 • tba [Kelburn]

Engineering

See also Computer System Engineering, Network Engineering, and Software Engineering

ENGR 101 – Engineering Technology

This course provides a general introduction to the fundamental technical concepts needed to understand the design and engineering of electronic, mechatronic, networked and software systems. Experience is gained in basic engineering practice, with assembly and testing of basic hardware, software and networked systems, and construction of a personal computer.

15 pts • (P) enrolment in BE(Hons)

1/3 • CRN 15243 • Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Wed, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ENGR 110 – Engineering Design

This course addresses the engineering design process through a collection of engineering projects that requre a range of technologies and design techniques. Sustainability will be an important component of the course, with some of the projects addressing technology and design for sustainable engineering.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102, ENGR 101 (X) ENGR 111

2/3 • CRN 26051 • Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 111 – Introduction to Renewable Energy Systems

This course will provide an overview of the role of energy systems in sustainability, and the development trends, past and future, of different technologies. The ways in which the technologies influence industry, government, and society will be examined from a range of different perspectives. Students will also gain practical skills in energy generation and utilisation through a range of experiments, as well as skills in modelling renewable energy systems for different contexts.

15 pts • (X) ENGR 110 from 2019

2/3 • CRN 30093 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 121 – Engineering Mathematics Foundations

An introduction to the range of mathematical techniques employed by engineers, including functions and calculus, linear algebra and vector geometry, probability and statistics. There is an emphasis on applications and modelling.

15 pts • (P) 16 AS credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics (or equivalent) or MATH 132; (X) Any pair (MATH 141/QUAN 111, MATH 151/161/177)

1/3 • CRN 26052 • Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 31158 • Mon, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENGR 122 – Engineering Mathematics with Calculus

Further mathematical techniques employed by electronic and computer systems engineers, with emphasis on methods of calculus, differential equations and linear Algebra. There is an emphasis on engineering applications and use of software.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 or MATH 141; (X) the pair (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 26053 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGR 123 – Engineering Mathematics with Logic and Statistics

Mathematical techniques employed by network and software engineers, including methods of combinatorics, logic, probability and decision theory. The course emphasises engineering applications of these techniques.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 (X) the pair MATH 161, (MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193);

2/3 • CRN 27044 • Mon, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31159 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-2pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 141 – Engineering Science

This course covers key topics in physics, and to a lesser extent chemistry, which are relevant to many aspects of Electronic and Software Engineering. Topics include: forms and use of energy; introductory atomic theory; exploitation of chemical energy; understanding and using heat; waves and their properties. Students will obtain an appreciation for quantitative scientific reasoning, practise problem solving skills and then develop a better understanding of the role of fundamental physical laws across engineering disciplines.

15 pts • (P) 16 credits of NCEA Level 3 mathematics or equivalent

1/3 • CRN 30094 • Mon, Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 142 – Engineering Physics for Electronics and Computer Systems

Physics theory and practice relevant to electronics and computer systems engineering. Topics covered will include electrostatics (charge, force, field, potential), magnetic field and force, DC and AC circuits, electromagnetic induction and other selected topics. Lectures, assignments and laboratory work will all focus on the application of physics to engineering situations.

15 pts • (P) either ENGR 141 and (ENGR 121 or MATH 141) or approved levels of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Physics and Calculus or equivalent; (X) PHYS 115

2/3 • CRN 27045 • Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 131 – Programming for Software Development

This course is the primary entry point for graduate students wishing to enter the Master of Software Development programme within the Wellington ICT Graduate School. Students will learn to design, read, write and debug small programs while using standard programming tools. The course will be taught as an intensive full time 5 week block course.

15 pts • (P) Applied for MSwDev; (X) COMP 102, 103, 112

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 202 – Digital Electronics

A practically oriented introduction to the design and construction of digital electronic instruments. The course provides a foundation in binary arithmetic and Boolean algebra, logic gates and families, combinational and sequential logic design, microprocessor architectures, programming and interfacing, and conversions of digital and analogue signals.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 101 or PHYS 115; 15 pts from (ENGR 121, 122, 123, MATH 141, 142, 151, 161) (X) PHYS 234

1/3 • CRN 18509 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn], Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 203 – Analogue Circuits and Systems

This course introduces electrical circuit analysis. Topics covered include circuit theorems, operational amplifiers circuits. It introduces the Laplace transform as an analysis tool.

15 pts • (P) MATH 142 or ENGR 122; ENGR 142 or PHYS 115; (X) PHYS 235

1/3 • CRN 18510 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 204 – Electronic Design

This course is a practically oriented introduction to fundamental electronic devices and their circuit applications. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals, diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 122 or MATH 142; ENGR 142 or PHYS 115; (X) PHYS 235, (ECEN 201 and ECEN 203 prior to 2016)

2/3 • CRN 28324 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 220 – Signals and Systems

The course introduces analysis techniques for signals and linear time-invariant systems. It includes Discrete and Continuous Fourier transform techniques, with applications to circuit analysis and communication systems.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121, 122) or (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 18511 • Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 201 – Engineering in Context

This course addresses the research, analysis, critical and creative thinking skills embodied in written and oral communication which professional engineers are expected to display in the workplace. While addressing these aspects, the course at the same time develops the personal and interpersonal skills required to work effectively as part of a team in an engineering context.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 101, 110 and 45 further points from Part 1 of the BE(Hons) schedule

2/3 • CRN 29036 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 240 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ENGR 241 – Directed Individual Study

30 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ENGR 291 – Work Experience Preparation

A range of activities in preparation for the work experience requirement for the BE(Hons).

0 pts • (P) ENGR 101, admission to part 2 of the BE(Hons)

1+2/3 • CRN 18717 • tba [Kelburn]

NWEN 241 – Systems Programming

This course considers the issues raised when programming at a low-level, for example in embedded systems, OS system level, or network protocol stacks. It includes an introduction to C language programming and motivating examples related to a wide variety of applications of system programming.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18315 • Tue, Thu, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 243 – Network Applications

The course provides a broad introduction to computer networks and a basic understanding of network application programming, with an emphasis on the working principles and application of computer networks. It covers a range of topics including basic data communication and computer network concepts, protocols, networked computing concepts and principles, network applications development and network security. The course features an interactive laboratory component with projects examining modern networking technologies such as, GPS enabled mobile phone applications, multimedia and distributed applications. The course assumes some familiarity with C programming.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103, NWEN 241

2/3 • CRN 19863 • Mon, Tue, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 211 – Renewable Energy Generation Systems

This course will expose the students to the different energy generation systems, and especially those that utilise renewable resources: wind energy (pumping and power), geothermal, hydro (different scales), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and bioenergy. For each system, the theoretical underpinning will be examined; for example, optical physics to harness solar radiation in a concentrating solar technology. The life cycle (sustainability) implications of the different systems will also be explored, including manufacturing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 110 or 111; ENGR 121 (or MATH 141 and 151); ENGR 141 (or PHYS 114 and CHEM 114)

1/3 • CRN 30108 • Tue, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

RESE 212 – Renewable Energy Conversion and Storage

This course will provide the students with insight into technologies to convert generated energy into useful fuels or power in the economy and society. It will specifically focus on bioenergy conversion processes, such as gasification, pyrolysis and torrefaction; chemical storage (solid-state and liquid batteries); and pumped and mechanical storage. For each technology platform the underlying physics and chemistry will be examined, with related practical experiments in the laboratory. The life cycle (sustainability) implications of the different,= technologies will also be explored, including manufacturing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 110 or 111; ENGR 121 (or MATH 141 and 151); ENGR 141 (or PHYS 114 and CHEM 114)

2/3 • CRN 30109 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

SWEN 221 – Software Development

This course develops a deeper understanding of object- oriented programming and associated practices. The focus is on programming techniques at the micro scale. Topics include: inheritance, polymorphism, genericity, error handling, testing and debugging. A sequence of short assignments will develop the key ideas and practices; rigour in testing will be developed through (automated) assessment of programme correctness.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18318 • Tue, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 225 – Software Design

This course develops a strong understanding of object-oriented design. Students will study modelling and programming techniques that support the analysis, design and development of large and maintainable programs. Students will work together in groups on an engineering problem and use a variety of best practices (e.g. Design Patterns) and notations (e.g. UML). Students will use specialized tools to apply these techniques in practical work.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 221; (X) SWEN 222

2/3 • CRN 30043 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ECEN 301 – Embedded Systems

This course details how embedded controllers can be used to solve a number of real-world engineering problems. The main emphasis is on 8-bit microprocessors, logic systems to support them and techniques to interface them with the physical world. Specific topics include microcontrollers, sensors, actuators, signal conditioning, filters, analogue to digital conversion, systems analysis and introductory control. Practical experience is gained through the use of programming a microcontroller in a high level language and interfacing it to real-world systems.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 202, 203 (X) PHYS 340

2/3 • CRN 18512 • Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-3pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 302 – Integrated Digital Electronics

Fundamentals of IC processing. Transistor based logic design using gates and switches, nMOS, CMOS, GaAs MESFET, BiCMOS logic design. Combinatoric arrays, sequential design, memory architectures, design for testability and observability. VLSI design using FPGAs.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 202 (or PHYS 234), ECEN 204

2/3 • CRN 18513 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 11-1pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 303 – Analogue Electronics

This course expands on ECEN 201, with an emphasis on developing analogue circuit design skills and applying them to the design of electronic instrumentation. The course covers to an advanced level, operational amplifier imperfections, noise, feedback and stability and operational amplifier applications such as active filters, differential amplifiers and oscillators. In addition, the course provides an introduction to diodes and diode circuits, BJTs and BJT circuits used within operational amplifiers, linear and switching power supplies and high power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 203 (or PHYS 235); ECEN 204; (X) PHYS 341

1/3 • CRN 18514 • Mon, Tue, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

ECEN 310 – Communication Engineering

This course provides the student with an introduction to communication systems focusing on the physical layer of the OSI model. It covers both analog and digital modulation techniques, including baseband and passband signaling. Topics include matched filter receivers for additive noise channels and associated error rate performance, intersymbol interference and Nyquist pulse shaping. Also covered are fundamentals of wireless fading channels, an overview of synchronization and a brief introduction to advanced techniques such as MIMO, OFDM and CDMA.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 220; (X) CSEN 303

2/3 • CRN 18515 • Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ECEN 315 – Control Systems Engineering

This course presents the analysis and modelling of linear dynamic systems and the design of linear feedback controllers for such systems. There is a focus on electrical, mechanical and electromechanical systems and the dynamic response of these systems. Properties and advantages of feedback control systems and the design of such systems using various design techniques are covered, as well as the implementation of PID controllers.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 203 (or 220 prior to 2016); (X) PHYS 422

1/3 • CRN 18516 • Tue, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 320 – Introductory Signal Processing

This course builds on the material of ECEN 220, providing more detail on signal analysis and system design. Topics covered include orthogonality, Fourier series, Fourier transform, the autocorrelation function, fast Fourier transform, Z transform, linear systems, filter design, filter structures, modulation and noise.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 220 or MATH 244; (X) ECSE 420, PHYS 420

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 321 – Engineering Statistics

The course introduces the fundamentals of engineering statistics. Topics include probability mass and density functions, random variables and functions of random variables, confidence intervals, statistical tests, and regression, as applied to engineering problems.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121, 122) or (MATH 142, 151), 30 200-level ECEN pts

1/3 • CRN 29033 • Mon, Wed, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENGR 301 – Project Management

Project management including aspects of life cycle, requirements analysis, principles of design, project tasks and deliverables, contracts, feasibility analysis, cost estimation and cost/benefit analysis, project scheduling, critical path analysis, risk management, quality assurance, managing project resources, testing and delivery, maintenance, interpersonal communication, teamwork and project leadership.

15 pts • (P) Admission to Part 2 of the BE(Hons), ENGR 201 and 60 200-level pts from (CYBR, COMP, ECEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN)

1/3 • CRN 17178 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

ENGR 302 – Group Project

Students will work in teams on a project of modest complexity, practising teamwork, project planning, the development of interface specifications and testing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 301

2/3 • CRN 17179 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 340 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ENGR 341 – Directed Individual Study

30 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2020

ENGR 391 – Practical Work Experience

A range of activities in preparation for the work experience requirement for the BE.

0 pts • (P) ENGR 291, admission to Part 2 of the BE(Hons)

1+2/3 • CRN 18718 • tba [Kelburn]

NWEN 301 – Operating Systems Design

This course addresses the design and implementation of operating sytems, and examines fundamental concepts such as resource management, concurrency, protection and security. Examples drawn from a range of modern operating systems illustrate these concepts and project work provides practical experience in the design and implementation of operating systems.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 342 (or 242)

2/3 • CRN 17180 • Tue, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 302 – Computer Network Design

This course addresses the principles, architectures and protocols that have shaped the development of the Internet and modern networked applications. It examines network design principles, underlying protocols, technologies and architectures of the TCP/IP protocol stack. Topics include the design of transport protocols, routing protocols, logical link control, medium access control and physical media.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 243; ENGR 123 or (MATH 161, one of MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 17181 • Tue, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

NWEN 303 – Concurrent Programming

This course examines a range of techniques for programming multi-threaded and distributed applications. Topics include synchronisation mechanisms used for programs that communicate via shared memory and message passing techniques for programs that communicate across a network. Practical work involves implementing programs using these techniques in a modern concurrent language, such as Java.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 123 or MATH 161; SWEN 221; 15 points from (COMP 261, CYBR 271, NWEN 241, 243)

1/3 • CRN 17182 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

NWEN 304 – Advanced Network Applications

This course introduces technologies, algorithms and systems for developing secure, scalable and reliable web server applications. Specific emphasis will be placed on application development middleware, computer security, network protocols and distributed systems. Particularly a variety of topics ranging from fundamental to advanced technologies for developing RESTful web applications, including MVC, distributed authentication and authorization, secure data communication, web caching and content replication, will be covered in lectures.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 123 or MATH 161, NWEN 243; COMP 261 or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221

2/3 • CRN 19864 • Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

NWEN 342 – Computer Organisation

The course develops an understanding of the structure of computers and how they execute programs. The course introduces the fundamentals of assembly language programming, data representation and computer arithmetic. It then develops an understanding of microprocessor architecture at the hardware level. Topics include digital electronics, arithmetic and logic unit (ALU), data paths, pipelining, memory hierarchy, I/O and motivating examples of computer systems. NB: this course runs for the first time in 2019.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, ENGR 123 or MATH 161 (X) NWEN 242

Not offered in 2020

RESE 311 – Energy Economic Analyses

This course introduces principles of economics, and how they relate to energy systems, specifically reflecting on the energy-economic nexus. It explores practical techniques to analyse the micro- and macro-economic implications of transitions in the energy system along with relevant business and financial analysis techniques. It presents an overview of the Resource Management Act and related aspects for engineering projects, such as Environmental Impact Assessments.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212; one of (STAT 193, QUAN 102, ECEN 321)

Not offered in 2020

RESE 312 – Sustainability Modelling Techniques

This course introduces various approaches to analyse the sustainability of systems, such as cost-benefit analysis, life cycle analysis, and simulation modelling techniques, with a focus on system dynamics modelling. Practical work explores simulation using an industry- standard software package and a project to model and investigate the sustainability implications of an implemented renewable energy technology in a specific context; for example, a bioenergy system in an island community.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212

Not offered in 2020

RESE 313 – Power Electronics and Electrical Machines

This course covers the theory, design and application of electrical machines, power electronic circuits, electric drives, and the transformation and control of electrical energy. The course introduces the fundamentals of power electronics and electrical machines, and discusses the design issues related to electrical drives and small-scale power generation. Practical work will involve the design, development, and implementation of solutions to drive motors, convert renewable power, and switch mode power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212; ECEN 202, 203

Not offered in 2020

RESE 323 – Renewable Energy Policy

This course provides an overview of the policy context of renewable energy, consisting of the regulatory, institutional, and market setting for renewable energy technologies. It explores the sustainability of the technologies from the perspectives of policy-makers and other stakeholders. The course equips students with the means to assess, identify, and prioritise renewable energy technologies from the perspectives of various stakeholders, as well as decision-making tools to promote appropriate and sustainable renewable energy technologies from a policy perspective.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212

Not offered in 2020

SWEN 301 – Structured Methods

This course introduces the processes, practices, and tools required to engineer medium to large software systems. Topics include software craft, architecture, design, implementation, testing, maintenance, quality assurance, configuration management, and open source development. Practical work will use integrated development environments, automation, and domain specific languages.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 225 (or both 222 and 223)

1/3 • CRN 17183 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 303 – User Interface Design

This course addresses the design and engineering of user interfaces. It presents principles and guidelines for design and covers a range of design processes. It presents techniques for testing user interfaces, and considers a variety of user interface styles and interface devices.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 221

1/3 • CRN 17185 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 11-12 [Kelburn]

SWEN 304 – Database System Engineering

The course addresses fundamental principles underlying databases and database management systems. It covers the structure and principles of the relational data model, including SQL, and the principled design of the relational database schema. It also addresses issues in database transaction procession, concurrency control, recovery, and the complexity of query processing.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 221; ENGR 123 or MATH 161

1/3 • CRN 17186 • Mon, Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 324 – Software Correctness

This course is concerned with the development of correct software, especially the use of formal requirements and specifications to develop high-integrity software. This has applications in several areas, such as safety-critical systems (e.g. commercial airliners, space systems, etc) and high-performance concurrent systems. The course will examine a range of principles and techniques which underpin a rigorous approach to the specification and implementation of software. A sequence of assignments and labs will see a range of tools being used to specify small software systems, and to check that they meet their requirements. NB: this course is first running in 2019.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103; ENGR 123 or MATH 161; 30 200-level COMP/NWEN/SWEN points; (X) SWEN 224

2/3 • CRN 30044 • Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 325 – Software Development for Mobile Platforms

This course addresses the concepts, techniques, and tools required for developing applications within software frameworks for mobile platforms. Topics include the concepts and principles underlying software frameworks, the design and implementation of client-server applications, principles of user experience design for frameworks, the design and implementation of client-server applications, principles of user experience design for mobile applications, and key concepts in reliability, privacy, security and safety critical systems. Practical work will involve the design, implementation and testing of a range of mobile applications.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 243, SWEN 225 (or 222)

2/3 • CRN 30041 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 326 – Safety-Critical Systems

This course addresses the concepts, techniques and tools required for developing computer systems that are applicable where safety and reliability is paramount. Topics include the concepts and principles underlying safety critical systems, design and implementation techniques for ensuring correctness, reliability, privacy, security, dependability, survivability, and safe failure. Practical work will involve the design, implementation, and analysis of simple safety critical applications, with examples taken from mobile, web, and embedded systems deployed in healthcare, robotics, and autonomous vehicles.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, SWEN 225 (or 222)

1/3 • CRN 30042 • Mon, Wed, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

ECEN 403 – Advanced Electronics

Advanced analogue and digital electronics, design principles, transform methods of analysis, active and passive filters, oscillators, phase-locked loops, digital signal processors, digital synthesis, communication principles, RF design.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 303 (or PHYS 340); ECEN 220 or MATH 243 or 244; (X) PHYS 423

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 404 – Microfabricated Devices

The course will introduce students to the theory and practice of fabrication processes and techniques that can be used to produce electronic, electromechanical and optical devices with micron sized features. The operating principles of structures such as solar cells, energy harvesters, optical superlenses, metamaterials and microfluidic devices will be covered. The course will enable students to gain hands-on experience in the design, fabrication and characterisation of a range of these devices.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 303

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 405 – Power Electronics

The course covers the theory, design and application of power electronic circuits and the transformation and control of electrical energy.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 303 (or PHYS 340)

1/3 • CRN 18521 • Mon, Wed, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

ECEN 410 – Advanced Communications Engineering

The course covers advanced topics in physical layer wireless communications. It begins with a brief introduction to Information Theory, leading to the concept of channel capacity. Multiple antenna techniques for both single and multiple user communications are discussed, including diversity, space time coding and digital beamforming. Large scale systems and advanced channel models are discussed. Matlab system simulations are used throughout the course for evaluating the communication system performance.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 310

1/3 • CRN 18522 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 415 – Advanced Control Systems Engineering

This course builds on and extends the principles of modern control systems engineering introduced in ECEN 315 to enable students to develop mathematical models and use these to design optimal control systems for real-world multivariable engineering systems. Kalman filters and linear quadratic regulators will be introduced and the principles and benefits of modern model-based predictive control systems will be outlined. Methods will be developed for continuous time system descriptions but techniques for converting to discrete time descriptions and for designing controls for discrete time systems will also be presented.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 315 (or PHYS 422)

2/3 • CRN 18519 • Tue, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 421 – Advanced Signal Processing

The goal of ECEN 421 is to provide a geometric intuition to signal processing. This geometric point of view is a powerful tool for the understanding of signal processing techniques including Fourier transforms, sampling theorems, time-frequency analysis and wavelets. The course provides the mathematical depth and rigor that is necessary for the study of more advanced topics in signal processing, as well as providing the details of applications including image compression, audio coding, and mobile sensing.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 321, (X) PHYS 421, TECH 421

Not offered in 2020

ECEN 422 – Convex Optimisation

Convex optimisation problems are common in science, engineering and economics. The course teaches identifying and solving convex optimisation problems. It discusses convex sets and functions, linear and quadratic programs, semi-definite programming, and duality theory. It uses these concepts to solve practical optimisation problems.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 321, or ECEN 220 (prior to 2016), or ECEN 320 (in 2016)

2/3 • CRN 29035 • Tue, Wed, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

ECEN 425 – Advanced Mechatronic Engineering 1: Hardware and Control

This course provides an introduction to the techniques of mechatronics. It begins by covering the engineering concepts of compromise in the choice of sensors. It then covers basic signal conditioning and noise concepts, derivation of the transfer function and the output from a mechatronic system - specifically some form of actuator. The course continues with some specific ranging sensor circuits and applications, including practical implementation. Practical control systems for industrial plant and mechatronic systems are detailed, e.g. PID, dynamic response and stability. Students design and construct their own microcontroller development system. Mechatronic design considerations are discussed based on implementation through the SolidWorks CAD package.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 301 (or PHYS 340)

2/3 • CRN 18524 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ECEN 430 – Advanced Mechatronic Engineering 2: Intelligence and Design

This course provides a guide to advanced techniques in the field of Mechatronics. The course material studies the interaction between hardware, software and communication components as it relates to embedded systems. Robotics are frequently used to illustrate the mechatronic theory. Artificial Intelligence techniques are introduced as a practical method for addressing the complex interactions between the electronic, mechanical and software components. The course is very practically oriented and primarily uses project-based assessments. These include a robotic competition, real-world customer design, industrial design considerations (in collaboration with the School of Design) and cognitive robotics.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 301 (or PHYS 340)

1/3 • CRN 18576 • Tue, Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ECEN 431 – Musical Robotics

This course is a project-based course that incorporates a music theme in the design and construction of a novel robotic musical instrument. The necessary fundamentals of the appropriate music theory are introduced, and then students are guided in a project-based learning style to develop an actuator and sensor rich robotic device that can play a suitable music score. Students are evaluated on their design, construction, testing and demonstration of this robotic device.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 301 (X) ECEN 427 in 2017-2018

2/3 • CRN 31155 • tba [Kelburn]

ENGR 401 – Professional Practice

This course will prepare student's expectations for many of the events and situations they are likely to meet in the professional working world. This includes: codes of conduct, as determined by professional bodies and company practices; ethical behaviour, as found in the workplace and dictated by company practices; critical thinking and people issues, as relevant in the workplace and in company practice.

15 pts • (P) 75 300-level pts from the BE(Hons) schedule including ENGR 301, 302

1/3 • CRN 18690 • Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 440 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from CGRA, COMP, CYBR, ECEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN; Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 26008 • [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27189 • [Kelburn]

ENGR 441 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from CGRA, COMP, CYBR, ECEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN; Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 26239 • [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 26009 • [Kelburn]

ENGR 489 – Engineering Project

Students will work on an individual project of a complex nature in order to develop a solution to an engineering problem. In addition to the technical engineering development work, the project may require consideration of issues such as customer specifications, cost analysis, IP and product testing and delivery. Students will be required to give an oral and a poster presentation as well as a final report on their project.

30 pts • (P) as for ENGR 401

1+2/3 • CRN 18688 • Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 491 – Professional Work Experience

Completion of the work experience requirement for the BE.

0 pts • (P) ENGR 391, 401

1+2+3/3 • CRN 18701 • tba [Kelburn]

NWEN 401 – Distributed Systems Design

Distributed system concepts and techniques underlie much of modern computer technology; client-server systems based on high-bandwidth networks support applications ranging from business data processing to multimedia information systems. This course teaches the concepts and principles employed in the design and implementation of distributed systems, with practical examples, providing a suitable knowledge base for those aiming for careers in advanced system and application development, or in research.

15 pts • (P) two courses from (NWEN 301, 302, 303)

Not offered in 2020

NWEN 402 – Internet Engineering

This course addresses the use of important technologies in the design and engineering of modern high performance Internet applications and infrastructure. Course coverage includes views on the impact of economic, political and technical issues on internet engineering which are explored through case studies and recent professional and research literature. These aspects are explored through practical group work in distributed systems/Internet technology plus lectures and seminars.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 302, 304; 15 further 300-level COMP, ECEN, NWEN or SWEN pts

Not offered in 2020

NWEN 403 – Advanced Network Engineering

This course extends the data communications and telecommunication taught in Computer Network Design, concentrating on new developments and network case studies. The course is designed for those aiming for careers that involve networking or network research and enhances the understanding of distributed systems through the applications of distributed systems in network management and Internet infrastructure.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 302, 30 further 300-level pts from (COMP, ECEN, NWEN, SWEN)

2/3 • CRN 18604 • Mon, Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 404 – Mobile Computing

The course introduces the fundamental topics of Mobile Computing. In particular, the course will emphasise the network and transport layers of wireless communication protocols and network infrastructure suitable for mobile personal systems (e.g. GSM, 3G, Mobile IP, etc). Key issues of mobility and disconnected operation with respect to mobile computing systems and quality of service issues in mobile personal systems will be covered and how applications handle node mobility and wireless communications will be explored.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 302 and 30 further 300-level pts from (COMP, ECEN, NWEN, SWEN)

2/3 • CRN 18605 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 405 – Security Engineering

The Internet's role as a large, public, distributed system has raised security to an issue of critical importance. This course examines security mechanisms, security policies, security evaluation and risk management, security issues in networks and operating systems, and case studies that show how these security techniques can be used to solve real- world problems such as conducting trustworthy auctions and secret ballots.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 304, 30 further 300-level pts from (COMP, ECEN, NWEN, SWEN)

Not offered in 2020

NWEN 406 – Distributed Computing in Grids and Clouds

The course focuses on the design and use of distributed systems for high end computing. In particular we look at the aggregation of geographically distributed computing resources to form massive distributed computing platforms. These platforms can then be applied to solve large problems in science and industry - protein docking, seismology medicine, astronomy, particle physics, climate prediction etc. Topics in this course typically include: e-Science, clusters, grids and clouds, service oriented architectures, workflow management, utility computing and grid economies.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 301; NWEN 302 or 303

Not offered in 2020

NWEN 438 – Special Topic: System and Network Security

This course addresses key concepts, techniques and tools needed to provide security in computer and communications systems. Topics include the need for security, system and network security threats such as malware or denial-of-service attacks, secure systems design, identity management, authentication, access control, and computer network defence. Practical work will involve developing operating system and network security tools such as keyloggers as well as choosing and implementing appropriate security controls to meet a small organisation's network security needs.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 243, 60 points of 300-level COMP/NWEN/SWEN (X) CYBR 371

1/3 • CRN 18593 • Tue, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 439 – Special Topic: Protocols and Architecture for the Internet of Things

This course introduces the fundamental networking protocols and architectures used in the Internet of Things (IoT). In particular, the course will examine the latest protocols and protocol stacks for low power wireless networking in both short-range and long-range settings. It will include in-depth discussion of protocols and algorithms at various layers of the network stack including medium access control, network, application, as well as security aspects unique to IoT.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 243; 60 further 300-level pts from (COMP, ECEN, NWEN, SWEN).

2/3 • CRN 18594 • [Kelburn]

RESE 411 – Power Systems Analysis

This course introduces the electricity industry and its components along with techniques for modern electric power system modelling and analysis. Topics include transmission line models, transformers and per unit systems, generator models, network matrices, power flow analysis and computation, real and reactive power control, voltage control, and protection. The course incorporates lab and simulation based exercises, an industrial tour, and an industrial project.

15 pts • (P) RESE 313; ECEN 202, 203

1/3 • CRN 31173 • Mon, Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], [Kelburn]

RESE 412 – Advanced Development of Renewable Energy Systems

This course presents techniques used to design advanced, integrated renewable energy solutions for given situations. The design of nano- and micro-grids will be analysed, with students applying this knowledge to designing, constructing and testing a fit-for-purpose renewable energy system. This course also presents the concept of systems engineering, introducing systems thinking principles.

15 pts • (P) RESE 313

2/3 • CRN 31165 • Mon, Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 421 – Formal Software Engineering

This course addresses the use of mathematical logic in the specification and construction for software systems. It presents an introduction to the area of formal methods; the formal specification of software systems; the refinement of specifications to code; and their semantic foundations.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 324 (or 224); 30 300-level pts from (COMP, SWEN)

1/3 • CRN 18661 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SWEN 422 – Human Computer Interaction

This course covers principles of human-computer interaction that underlie good design of software user interfaces. Advanced topics are introduced with a focus on current research areas.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 303

2/3 • CRN 18662 • Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 423 – Design: Patterns, Frameworks and Languages

Object-orientation is the basis for many approaches to programming, systems, languages and applications. This course discusses the design principles of object-orientation and studies advanced topics in system design, programming language and development process.

15 pts • (P) COMP 304 or SWEN 301; 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN, SWEN pts

2/3 • CRN 18663 • Mon, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

SWEN 424 – Model-Driven Development

An introduction to model-driven development - the modern approach to large scale software system development along with an introduction to the core concepts of model-driven development, the course will address the foundations and principles for supporting infrastructures. This includes an in-depth discussion of 'metamodelling' and a critique of existing modelling techniques. Students will get hands-on experience with using a meta-case tool.

15 pts • (P) 30 300-level pts from (COMP, NWEN, SWEN)

1/3 • CRN 18664 • Mon, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 425 – Design Patterns

The course addresses a variety of advanced issues in Software Engineering, including the use for Software Patterns for software design.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 301, 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN or SWEN pts

Not offered in 2020

SWEN 426 – Advanced Software Implementation and Development

This course begins by covering issues relating to the successful implementation of a software design, including processes, metrics, the choice of programming language, the choice of implementation tools, coding styles, code reviews, and testing. The course also looks closely at the maintenance stage of softward development, and the issue of quality throughout the entire development process. Issues such as software quality assurance, configuration management and software process improvement are raised.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 301, 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN or SWEN pts

Not offered in 2020

SWEN 427 – Advanced Software Engineering: Requirements and Design

This course covers basic concepts and principles of software requirements engineering, its tools and techniques, including a survey of methods for modelling software requirements. The course also covers methods and techniques used in the design of software systems, including both architectural and detailed design. In the requirements and design areas issues such as documentation, reviews and inspections are covered.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 301, 15 further 300-level SWEN pts

Not offered in 2020

SWEN 430 – Compiler Engineering

The course looks at a range of issues relating to the design and implementation of modern compilers. In particular, the course will focus on techniques and algorithms for code generation, code optimisation and type checking. During the course projects, students will be working on a fully-fledged Java compiler to extend it in various ways. Students should expect to learn a great deal about how compilers work and, in particular, about the Java compiler and Java Bytecode instruction set.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 324 (or 224); 30 further 300-level points from (COMP, NWEN 303, SWEN)

2/3 • CRN 18668 • Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 431 – Advanced Programming Languages

This course develops and extends understanding of the functional programming paradigm, by studying both its theoretical foundations and the practical aspects of programming in a functional language.

15 pts • (P) COMP 304; 15 further 300-level COMP or SWEN pts; (X) COMP 432

Not offered in 2020

SWEN 432 – Advanced Database Design and Implementation

This course explores a selection of the following topics: XML Databases, Cloud Databases, Data Warehouse and Object-Relational Databases. It examines features of these advanced database systems and analyses the new applications they facilitate.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 304, 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN or SWEN pts; (X) COMP 442

1/3 • CRN 18670 • Mon, Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 433 – Web Information Systems Engineering

This course gives a technology-centered introduction to web information systems and services. On successful completion of the course students are able to explain basic concepts used in building and managing web information systems. They know central technological standards underlying web information systems and web services, understand architectural principles, and are able to evaluate and critically discuss such systems.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 304, 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN or SWEN pts; (X) COMP 443

2/3 • CRN 18671 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 434 – Data Warehousing

This course considers theory, design and implementation of Data Warehouses.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 304, 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN or SWEN pts; (X) COMP 444

Not offered in 2020

English Literature

ENGL 111 – Wild Civility: English Literature, 1380-1830

"Wild Civility" introduces some of the great English texts from the medieval to the Romantic period (1380-1830). It explores literature from the bawdy tales of Chaucer, to the drama and poetry of the age of Shakespeare, to the verse of the Romantic poet Keats. These texts provide a vivid insight into the literature of the past, its themes and techniques, and into the foundations of the English literary canon. The course also focuses on the essential reading skills which enable a student to understand and enjoy such works, and on the basic skills of academic writing.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 112 – Cultural Encounters: The Literature of Aotearoa New Zealand

Twenty-first century New Zealand literature in English has been shaped by a variety of cultures, literatures, traditions and practices: Māori, Pasifika, European, and Asian- from the tangata whenua to the various tangata tiriti. These encounters- on the page as well in society at large- have resulted in a contemporary literary scene that is innovative, exciting and challenging, breaking new ground in form and delivery as well as content. This course is an introduction to these contemporary voices.

20 pts • (X) THEA 112

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 114 – Popular Literature: Convention, Innovation and Resistance

This course examines five hundred years of popular literature, from the ballad to the graphic novel, focusing on the genres of romance, gothic, the detective story, and science fiction. Particular attention will be paid to the way that literary conventions are established, endorsed, modified and subverted.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 8020 • Tue, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 116 – Reading Shakespeare: An Introduction

ENGL 116 is an introduction to the reading of Shakespeare focused on close study of a single play with associated material. The main focus will be on understanding the text, with detailed attention to Shakespeare's language, imagery, and rhetoric, as well as to the play's themes and dramatic construction. The play will be opened out by study of related materials: sources, contemporary documents, parallel scenes from other plays, critical discussions, adaptions, and audio-visual versions of the play in performance. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 117 – Introduction to Narrative

This course aims to provide students with some essential tools for the study of narrative. The primary focus is literary fiction, but examples will be drawn from a variety of genres and media for comparative purposes. Students will be introduced to distinctive aspects of narrative form and provided with a basic critical vocabulary for the accurate analysis of narrative texts.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 17039 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGL 172 – Reading and Writing Poetry

An introduction to between 50 and 100 poems by poets ranging from Shakespeare to Anne Carson. Students will also be introduced to some of the best critical readings on individual poems, and selected essays by leading poetry critics. Finally, students will learn the basic skills needed to write good poetry. The course will teach skills in both critical and creative writing.

20 pts • (X) FHSS 101 2016-2018

2/3 • CRN 32024 • (L1) Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 32222 • (L2) Mon, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

FHSS 103 – Great Ideas

Great Ideas is a course reflecting on some of the most exciting, important and revolutionary ideas that have shaped society and culture as it is today. It also considers how those ideas have an ongoing influence. It’s an interdisciplinary course looking at topics across the humanities, arts and social sciences.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 29009 • tba [Distance (NZ)]

3/3 • CRN 29011 • tba [Distance (NZ)]

LCCM 171 – The Art of Writing: Literary and Creative Communication

Even in a modern world dominated by visual and digital media, written communication remains the most essential and powerful tool not only in the university but in all social and professional contexts. This course draws on traditions of literary and creative writing to teach the skills of clear, persuasive, and imaginative written communication. You will analyse and create critical and personal forms of writing which may include the essay, the review, the blog, the social media post, the memoir and the polemic. The course complements the academic writing skills taught in WRIT 101.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 32025 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn]

CREW 253 – Poetry Workshop - He Rotarota

A workshop course in writing poetry which also involves wide reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

2/3 • CRN 9493 • ^ Thu 3-6pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 254 – Short Fiction Workshop - He Kōrero Paki

A workshop course in writing short fiction which also involves wide reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9495 • ^ Mon 2-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 9496 • ^ Fri 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 255 – Writing for the Young- He Tuhinga mā ngā Tamariki

A workshop course in writing for children which also involves wide reading of children's literature.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9497 • ^ Fri 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 257 – Creative Nonfiction Workshop- He Kōrero Pono

A workshop course in writing creative nonfiction (e.g. memoirs, travel writing) which also involves representative reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

2/3 • CRN 9499 • ^ Mon 4-7pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 258 – Iowa Prose Workshop - He Tuhinga no Tawahi

A topic in creative writing. Course materials will be an additional cost.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts, and an appropriate standard in written composition.

3/3 • CRN 17403 • ^ Tue, Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 259 – Iowa Poetry Workshop - He Rotarota nō Tāwāhi

A topic in creative writing. Course materials will be an additional cost.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts, and an appropriate standard in written composition.

3/3 • CRN 17404 • ^ Tue, Thu 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 260 – Māori and Pasifika Creative Writing Workshop- Te Hiringa a Tuhi

This creative writing workshop is a practical paper for students who wish to produce fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry or scriptwriting which is informed by Māori or Pasifika perspectives, cultures and origins, the process of colonisation, or questions of identity and belonging. However, this is not a prescriptive list, and students are free to write creatively in ways that do not directly address these subjects. The writing workshop will form the heart of this course, with students also reading and discussing Māori, Pasifika and other writers of colour.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 200-level and approval of the Programme Director (X) CREW 256 (2014-2018)

2/3 • CRN 31060 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ENGL 201 – Sea Changes: A History of English Literature

An exploration of the history of literature(s) in English, from the Anglo-Saxons to contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand. It is built around case studies of a series of major texts in their changing historical and cultural contexts, the texts being linked by the shared motif of voyages by sea.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 202 – Nineteenth-Century American Literature

A survey of American literature of the nineteenth century with special attention to major works and writers. This course explores topics such as the gothic, race, indigenous populations, transcendentalism, and national identity through a range of literary forms, including poetry, short stories, novels, and the essay.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 28002 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGL 203 – Modernist Literature

A survey of British and Irish literature from 1910 to the Second World War. This course studies many of the major writers of the Modernist period and includes poetry short stories, novels and plays. Particular attention will be paid to the historical context, including the First World War, feminism, the Depression, Irish politics and nationalism, and the emergence of totalitarian ideologies.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 28311 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

ENGL 208 – Shakespeare

A study of four or five plays (normally including a history, a comedy, a tragedy and a romance), approached both as literary texts and as scripts for stage performance and film adaptation. We will also draw on scenes from other plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries. This course is also able to be taken towards a major in THEA.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) THEA 208

2/3 • CRN 1408 • Mon, Tue, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 209 – The Nineteenth Century Novel

The English novel from its beginnings to 1930, with special attention to a selection of major works. The lectures discuss the novel's general historical development, special areas of interest, and individual authors and works; tutorials give practice in the critical study of the form and text of major novels.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 211 – Science Fiction

Science Fiction as a literary genre from its beginnings to the present day, with special attention to a selection of canonical works. The lectures discuss Science Fiction’s general historical development, special areas of interest, and individual authors and works; tutorials give practice in the critical study of the form and text of major novels and short stories.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 32016 • Mon, Wed, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ENGL 225 – Classical Traditions in English Literature

An introduction to the influence of the classics (Greek and Roman) on English literature from the middle ages to the present. The course focuses on the transformations of some key classical myths and two classical genres. Classical texts are read in translation; no previous classical knowledge is assumed.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 3498 • Mon, Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 231 – Modern Poetry

A study of a range of modern poetry in English (mostly British, American and Irish).

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 234 – New Zealand Literature

A thematic and historical study of New Zealand literature from the eighteenth century to the present focussing on such issues as: fantasies of place and encounter; the ecologies of the colonial world; cultural nationalism and literature as ‘a home in thought’; literature and transgression; writing as other; and the future of national literatures.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 8617 • Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 244 – Children's Literature

The course introduces the study of children's literature through a substantial selection of texts by a range of recognised authors - normally including a New Zealand writer.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2020

THEA 205 – Dramaturgies of the West

This course explores the development, theory, and practice of Western dramaturgy from Romanticism to the present. Dramaturgy is the study of how meaning is generated in drama and performance. Students will learn and practice a suite of analytic and synthetic skills associated with Western and text-based dramaturgy, and conduct performance-based research on selected plays. The course aims to a) develop familiarity with from the canons of modern and post-modern drama; b) equip students with knowledge and skills of dramaturgy; and c) provide students with a critical understanding of and practical experience in dramaturgical work. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 20 THEA pts or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ENGL 341, THEA 305

Not offered in 2020

THEA 211 – From Whare Tapere to the Globe: Theatre of Aotearoa/New Zealand

A study of the diverse theatrical practices of theatre in Aotearoa New Zealand from the pre-colonial era to the present. There will be a core focus on how on how cultural identities have been formed and expressed through performance and playwriting. The course focuses on work from tangata whenua, diasporic and settler cultures across a variety of genres; from realist to devised, dance drama and street theatre.

20 pts • (P) 20 THEA pts or 40 pts from Part A of the BA schedule; (X) THEA 321

1/3 • CRN 27042 • Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGL 307 – Troy and Troilus

A close study of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, read in the context of its forerunners and successors, including Henryson's 'Testament of Cresseid', Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida, and Chaucer's source poem, the Italian Renaissance author Boccaccio's Il Filostrato (in translation). This course entails a close study of what has been called 'the greatest narrative poem in English', Chaucer's romantic tragedy Troilus and Criseyde. The poem will be read in the context of the other stories of Troy and Troilus that influenced Chaucer, or were influenced by him, particularly Shakespeare's play on the same subject. Chaucer's principal source, the Italian author Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, is read in translation. 60% internal assessment, 40% examination.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 308 – Renaissance Literature

A study of early modern English poetry and drama from 1560-1680, the flowering of the Renaissance to the English Civil Wars. The course focuses on themes of love and friendship, conscience, selfhood, gender, society and the state. Focal texts are selected from a range of canonical and counter-canonical authors, and will include some of: Philip Sidney, Shakespeare, John Donne, John Webster, Anne Bradstreet, Andrew Marvell, Katherine Philips, Margaret Cavendish and John Milton.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 311 – Romantic Literature

This course is primarily an introduction to the great poetry of the Romantic period in Britain (1789-1832). In addition we will also consider literary texts about prominent social and political issues (e.g. slavery, the wars with America and France). We will mainly focus on poetry by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron and Keats.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

2/3 • CRN 8630 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 312 – Victorian Literature

This course examines a selection of fiction, non-fiction and poetry from the Victorian period, under the broad categories of gender and sexuality, religious doubt, and empire. It deals with such central nineteenth-century literary and cultural preoccupations as ‘the woman question’, the stereotype of woman as angel or demon; the implications modernity and, in particular, Darwinian theories of evolution for traditional belief; and the ways in which literature, variously, constructs, reinforces, and complicates the relationship of coloniser and Indigenous subject.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205,211.

1/3 • CRN 8631 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 314 – The Chivalric Quest from Chaucer to Spenser

The Reformation was among other things a cultural revolution. This course examines its impact in England. It begins with late Middle English romances and includes one of the York mystery plays and medieval lyrics featuring Christ as knight and lover. These provide the context for a reading of Edmund Spenser’s post-Reformation masterpiece The Legend of the Knight of the Red Cross as a pseudo-medieval romance strongly reflective of the new ideology of the Reformation.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 315 – Restoration and 18th Century Literature

This course examines the literature of the eighteenth century, with particular attention to the changing role of the writer, the emergence of journalism and the novel, travel, colonisation and imperialism, and the connections between literature and politics.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 330 – Postcolonial Literature

This course considers the impact of British colonial expansion on the development of modern literature, with a particular focus on texts written in the 20th century. The texts discussed represent a variety of different national literatures and are considered in the contexts of their historical and cultural production. Recent post-colonial debates provide the theoretical framework for discussion.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 331 – New Zealand Literature

This course is organised into distinct modules, each of which is centred on a particular author or movement considered in terms of an issue or argument. We start by looking at colonial writing from two different perspectives, questioning the origins and meaning of a 'national literature'. We consider Maori literature in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a complex legacy still obscured from literary history, and we revisit the long despised literature of 'Maoriland', asking why and how we might read it and whether it speaks to us now. Next we look at Robin Hyde's relations to the cultural nationalist movement from which she was excluded. We then consider cultural nationalism and canon-making. We look at the vivid controversies surrounding Keri Hulme's the bone people, and, finally, we examine the poetry and poetics of Bill Manhire and other contemporary writers by way of Anna Smaill's chapter in the History of New Zealand Literature.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 332 – American Literature: Twentieth Century

This course will be concerned with studying the developments in American Literature, in prose and poetry, from the turn of the 20th century to the present. The course considers the impact of major literary movements of the 20th century, including Modernism, the Beats, Minimalism or "Dirty Realism", and the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poetry movement of the 1980s.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

1/3 • CRN 8635 • Mon, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 334 – Awkward Books

What leads people to ban, burn, censor, censure or generally revile works of literature? This course will investigate the relationship between literary fiction and ethics by reading a series of controversial novels written in the last hundred years against the context of their production and reception.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211 (X) ENGL 301; ENGL 348 in 2013–15;

Not offered in 2020

ENGL 348 – Special Topic: Literature, Ecology, and Climate Change

How can literature help us to understand the origins and consequences of climate change? This course will investigate questions about systems of collective behaviour, modes of existing with (and without) other species, and forms of conceptualising alternative and catastrophic futures through readings from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 11266 • Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

THEA 305 – Dramaturgies of the West

This course explores the development, theory, and practice of Western dramaturgy from Romanticism to the present. Dramaturgy is the study of how meaning is generated in drama and performance. Students will learn and practice a suite of analytic and synthetic skills associated with Western and text-based dramaturgy, and conduct performance-based research on selected plays. The course aims to a) develop familiarity with from the canons of modern and pot-modern drama; b) equip students with knowledge and skills of dramaturgy; and c) provide students with a critical understanding of and practical experience in dramaturgical work. Co-taught with THEA 205. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from THEA 201-299; (X) ENGL 241, THEA 205.

Not offered in 2020

Environmental Science

RESE 211 – Renewable Energy Generation Systems

This course will expose the students to the different energy generation systems, and especially those that utilise renewable resources: wind energy (pumping and power), geothermal, hydro (different scales), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and bioenergy. For each system, the theoretical underpinning will be examined; for example, optical physics to harness solar radiation in a concentrating solar technology. The life cycle (sustainability) implications of the different systems will also be explored, including manufacturing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 110 or 111; ENGR 121 (or MATH 141 and 151); ENGR 141 (or PHYS 114 and CHEM 114)

1/3 • CRN 30108 • Tue, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

RESE 212 – Renewable Energy Conversion and Storage

This course will provide the students with insight into technologies to convert generated energy into useful fuels or power in the economy and society. It will specifically focus on bioenergy conversion processes, such as gasification, pyrolysis and torrefaction; chemical storage (solid-state and liquid batteries); and pumped and mechanical storage. For each technology platform the underlying physics and chemistry will be examined, with related practical experiments in the laboratory. The life cycle (sustainability) implications of the different,= technologies will also be explored, including manufacturing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 110 or 111; ENGR 121 (or MATH 141 and 151); ENGR 141 (or PHYS 114 and CHEM 114)

2/3 • CRN 30109 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENSC 301 – Topics in Environmental Science

Topics in environmental science that may include: environmental toxicology, Antarctica and environmental change, greenhouse effect environmental risk assessment, mathematical modelling of environmental problems; human health and ecology, atmosphere and ocean dynamics and natural resource management. This course will allow students to integrate their science discipline into an environmental framework and discuss, analyse and apply these ideas.

20 pts • (P) 90 pts of 200-level study in approved subjects from the Science schedule; (C) ENSC 302 or 303 and admission to the major in Environmental Science.

1/3 • CRN 18345 • Mon, Thu 12-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENSC 302 – Directed Individual Study

20 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School.

2/3 • CRN 18346 • Mon, Thu 3-6pm [Kelburn]

ENSC 303 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School.

Not offered in 2020

RESE 311 – Energy Economic Analyses

This course introduces principles of economics, and how they relate to energy systems, specifically reflecting on the energy-economic nexus. It explores practical techniques to analyse the micro- and macro-economic implications of transitions in the energy system along with relevant business and financial analysis techniques. It presents an overview of the Resource Management Act and related aspects for engineering projects, such as Environmental Impact Assessments.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212; one of (STAT 193, QUAN 102, ECEN 321)

Not offered in 2020

RESE 312 – Sustainability Modelling Techniques

This course introduces various approaches to analyse the sustainability of systems, such as cost-benefit analysis, life cycle analysis, and simulation modelling techniques, with a focus on system dynamics modelling. Practical work explores simulation using an industry- standard software package and a project to model and investigate the sustainability implications of an implemented renewable energy technology in a specific context; for example, a bioenergy system in an island community.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212

Not offered in 2020

RESE 313 – Power Electronics and Electrical Machines

This course covers the theory, design and application of electrical machines, power electronic circuits, electric drives, and the transformation and control of electrical energy. The course introduces the fundamentals of power electronics and electrical machines, and discusses the design issues related to electrical drives and small-scale power generation. Practical work will involve the design, development, and implementation of solutions to drive motors, convert renewable power, and switch mode power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212; ECEN 202, 203

Not offered in 2020

RESE 323 – Renewable Energy Policy

This course provides an overview of the policy context of renewable energy, consisting of the regulatory, institutional, and market setting for renewable energy technologies. It explores the sustainability of the technologies from the perspectives of policy-makers and other stakeholders. The course equips students with the means to assess, identify, and prioritise renewable energy technologies from the perspectives of various stakeholders, as well as decision-making tools to promote appropriate and sustainable renewable energy technologies from a policy perspective.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212

Not offered in 2020

CCSP 401 – Physical Basis of Climate Change

Students will learn elementary radiative transfer physics, energy balance, concepts of climate forcing, feedback and response. Some elements of planetary circulation will be covered, along with modes of variability. Carbon, methane and nitrogen cycles will be covered in support of understanding the relationship between emissions and concentrations. Introductory atmospheric, oceanic and cryosphere physics will be taught. Topics to be covered include: observations of the atmosphere, ocean, carbon cycle and cryosphere; earth system models and their performance; modes of variability; patterns of forcing, feedback and response; and emergent patterns of change.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 30159 • Wed 10-12 [Kelburn]

CCSP 402 – Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

This course will provide participants with high-level understanding of climate change impacts and adaptation at global, national and local scales. Climate prediction models will be used to examine social and biophysical vulnerabilities to environmental change, and explore policies and measures to minimise impacts, and the potential for adaptation at different scales. Topics include: global and local implications of climate change impacts and adaptation, implications (and risks) of a variable and changing climate on particular societies, models, feedback processes and uncertainties; adaptation strategies; categories of adaptation; Māori knowledge and values related to adaptation, information and communication; public engagement.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 30160 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CCSP 403 – International Climate Change Policy

This course provides an overview of international climate policy, drawing on policy-relevant physical climate change science, economics, game theory, ethics, and international relations theory relevant for climate policy. At the end of the course students will understand and be able to critically analyse key decision-relevant aspects of climate change science and environmental economics, as well as the history, theory and prospects of landmark efforts to govern climate change, domestically and internationally.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30161 • Thu 1-3pm [Kelburn]

CCSP 404 – Climate Change Mitigation

An examination of the domestic and international policy issues surrounding climate change mitigation, including why mitigation represents a challenging social and economic as well as environmental problem; differing perspectives on policy solutions to the mitigation challenge; linkages with international policy; policies and behaviour change; the roles of relevant institutions; sectoral considerations and policy measures; policy communication, and the politics of mitigation strategies.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30162 • Mon 3-5pm [Kelburn]

RESE 411 – Power Systems Analysis

This course introduces the electricity industry and its components along with techniques for modern electric power system modelling and analysis. Topics include transmission line models, transformers and per unit systems, generator models, network matrices, power flow analysis and computation, real and reactive power control, voltage control, and protection. The course incorporates lab and simulation based exercises, an industrial tour, and an industrial project.

15 pts • (P) RESE 313; ECEN 202, 203

1/3 • CRN 31173 • Mon, Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], [Kelburn]

RESE 412 – Advanced Development of Renewable Energy Systems

This course presents techniques used to design advanced, integrated renewable energy solutions for given situations. The design of nano- and micro-grids will be analysed, with students applying this knowledge to designing, constructing and testing a fit-for-purpose renewable energy system. This course also presents the concept of systems engineering, introducing systems thinking principles.

15 pts • (P) RESE 313

2/3 • CRN 31165 • Mon, Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CCSP 510 – Research Essay

This major research project gives the student scope to investigate a climate related topic of particular interest, and centres on writing and presenting an extended research essay of up to 15,000 words. The investigation will relate to a research question concerning an aspect of climate change science or policy, broadly interpreted. It will consist of a review of the literature, some primary research and analysis, and the leading of a seminar to share understanding of the project’s outcomes with fellow students.

60 pts • (P) Completion of Part 1 and Part with at least B+ average or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 30163 • [Kelburn]

CCSP 511 – Practicum Placement and Project

This course has three components: a placement, a research project, and presentation of a seminar. The placement is a period of work with an employer in the field of climate change science, policy or management (e.g. climate-related transport research or policy formulation). The short research project aims to research a particular aspect of the work undertaken, or the host organisation itself, to enrich the student’s understanding of the organisation’s work. A seminar aims to share understanding among fellow students of the role of the host organisation.

60 pts • (P) Completion of Part 1 and Part 2 with at least B+ average or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 30164 • [Kelburn]

Environmental Studies

GEOG 114 – Environment and Resources: the Foundations

This course integrates the physical, social, economic, and political factors associated with environmental change. First, the course introduces the earth systems associated with environmental change (both natural and human induced). Second, the course explore the social, political and economic implications of contemporary environmental issues and human-environment relations.

15 pts • (X) ENVI 114

1/3 • CRN 7021 • Tue, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 214 – Environment and Resources: New Zealand Perspectives

This course examines major environmental issues and challenges New Zealand faces today. The course highlights policy and management frameworks in place to address these environmental issues. Students also critically appraise how well current policy and management mechanisms achieve the goal of environmental sustainability.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 114 or 15 approved points; (X) ENVI 214

2/3 • CRN 6004 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SCIE 212 – To be confirmed

15 pts

Not offered in 2020

GEOG 313 – Geographies of New Zealand

GEOG 313 studies human geographies of New Zealand, including demography, historical geography, political economy, economic geography, industrial geography, rural geography, social geography and urban geography, in both historical and contemporary settings. For final year students it will advance their knowledge of contemporary geographical processes in the New Zealand environment. For foreign, exchange or graduate students it will give them an advanced introduction to geographical context of the country in which they are studying. Lecture and field trip dates are to be confirmed.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level GEOG pts or approved courses for non-GEOG majors (X) GEOG 311

3/3 • CRN 18579 • [Kelburn]

GEOG 314 – Advanced Environment and Resources: Global Issues

Building on GEOG 114 and 214 this course takes a global perspective to explore: pressures on resources that result from a global economy; cultural, societal and historical influences that shape how we value, use and manipulate resources and the environment; interdisciplinary approaches to addressing contemporary environmental problems.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 214 (X) ENVI 314

2/3 • CRN 6011 • Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

Fashion Design Technology

DSDN 153 – Fashion Construction Studio I / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu I

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Mon 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

FADN 101 – Fashion Construction Studio I

This course covers the principles of designing patterns and researching material properties, covering a range of drawn and CAD-Based approaches. Students will explore the history and cultural theories related to fashion design, including matauranga Maori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a Context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts

Not offered in 2020

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

1/3 • CRN 32107 • Tue 3.30-5pm [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 32108 • Tue 1.30-3pm [Te Aro]

FADN 201 – Fashion Construction Studio II / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu II

In this intermediate course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and trialling various pattern design and manufacturing techniques to develop wearable forms. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique design position.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 153; acceptance into the FADN major

1/3 • CRN 32117 • Mon 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

FADN 202 – Fashion Construction Studio III / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu III

This intermediate course will extend on the principles of fashion design covered in FADN 201 with an emphasis on material research, which will require students to source and trial various textile processes. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique design position.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including FADN 201

2/3 • CRN 32115 • Tue 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 242 – Generative Textiles / Ngā Papanga ā-Waihanga

Using generative approaches to textile design informed by broad cultural contexts and/or emerging technologies students taking this course will explore the systemised creation of textiles. Students will be exposed to a range of software, manufacturing and production techniques to create artefacts using a constructive rather than restrictive set of rules.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 32121 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 273 – Fashion in Society / Kākahu i te Papori

Across human history, fashion has played an important role in every aspect of culture: religious order, social status, occupational position and rank, personal freedom (or lack thereof) and rejection of the status quo. In this course students will analyse precedents as well as cross-cultural examples, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design) that reveal the nuanced socio-political narratives embodied in the garments and objects that people wear.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 32123 • tba [Te Aro]

Film

FHSS 107 – Mental Health and Disorder: Inter-disciplinary Perspectives

This course approaches mental health and mental disorder from various disciplinary perspectives. It considers definitions of mental disorder, representations of mental illness in film and literature, cultural and scientific conceptions of the healthy mind, and social and demographic influences upon mental health. The course introduces students to the methods of several disciplines, which may include Literature, Māori Studies, Psychology, Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, and Sociology.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 30171 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn]

FILM 101 – Introduction to Film Analysis

This course examines how cinema creates meaning through formal elements such as narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound and editing. It introduces students to key concepts and terms in Film Studies. It develops their textual analysis skills and explores different practices of interpretation.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 9914 • Mon 3-6pm [Kelburn], Tue 12-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

FILM 102 – Film Movements and Contexts

This course involves a critical exploration of several important stages in the history of cinema. These periods will be examined within a range of artistic, cultural, historical, material and/or theoretical contexts.

20 pts • (X) FILM 231

2/3 • CRN 26086 • Mon 12-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-3pm [Kelburn]

FILM 201 – Critical Approaches to Film Studies

This course involves a survey of the significant theoretical approaches that inform Film Studies. Topics will vary from year to year but may include realism, formalism, semiotics, narratology, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, and/or postmodernism. In 2017 it will focus on embodied cinemas, that is to say cinemas that encourage physical, bodily and sensory responses from viewers such as horror films, 3D cinema, pornography, haptic cinema and dance films. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 331

Not offered in 2020

FILM 202 – Cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand

This course focuses on the cinema and visual culture of Aotearoa New Zealand from different cultural, aesthetic, historical, industrial and economic perspectives.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 237

Not offered in 2020

FILM 203 – Film Cultures A

This course is a study of a film culture or linked film cultures that are fostered through shared production, distribution and exhibition practices and that emerge from particular cultural or subcultural contexts. It explores the relationship of film and culture across national/transnational or cross-cultural frames.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 233

2/3 • CRN 26088 • Tue 9-12 [Kelburn], Wed 10-12 [Kelburn]

FILM 204 – Film Histories

This course investigates a specific period or type of film history. It will situate cinema in a particular historical context and examine how historiographical approaches can be applied in Film Studies.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 233 in 2013

2/3 • CRN 26089 • Mon 9-12 [Kelburn], Tue 12-2pm [Kelburn]

FILM 205 – Film Genre

This course will examine one or more film genres from an aesthetic, historical, cultural, and/or economic perspective.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 338

1/3 • CRN 26090 • Mon 1-4pm [Kelburn], Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

FILM 206 – Hollywood Cinema

This course will examine one or more periods of Hollywood cinema from an aesthetic, historical, cultural, and/or economic perspective. In 2018 the course will survey key features of Hollywood cinema from 1980-2010 in order to understand contemporary Hollywood. This may include high concept cinema, the blockbuster and franchise filmmaking, CGI and immersive entertainment, Indiewood, genres such as the teen film, romantic comedy, and superhero film, and representations of gender.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 234 and FILM 334 in 2013

Not offered in 2020

FILM 210 – Introduction to Film Production

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop practical skills in production including directing, cinematography, editing and sound. It involves both individual and collaborative production exercises as well as script development assignments. Please note that in order to be considered for this limited entry course, your enrolment application must submitted by 1 December in the year prior to enrolment.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 222

2/3 • CRN 26085 • ^ Thu 9-11 [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FILM 301 – Current Issues in Film Studies

This course will focus on significant contemporary debates and theoretical issues in Film Studies. Topics will vary.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts in FILM at 200-level

Not offered in 2020

FILM 302 – Cinema and Representation

This course examines how cinema represents issues such gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality and/or class in a critical manner. Topics will vary. In 2019 the course will focus on feminist, queer and transgender film criticism and cinemas. The course will introduce theories of representation and spectatorship central to feminist, queer and transgender film studies, survey their applications to a diverse set of films, and examine provocative depictions of sexuality, identity and society onscreen.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts or 40 PASI pts; (X) FILM 336

Not offered in 2020

FILM 303 – Pacific Cinema

This course focuses on Pacific cinema from a range of cultural, aesthetic, historical, industrial and/or economic perspectives. Topics may vary from year to year. In 2016 the course will focus on colonial/settler visual and literary representations of the Pacific, largely focusing on Polynesia. It will then turn to contemporary indigenous films/TV shows and other visual material and some literature from the Pacific region which engages or reworks representational histories of the Pacific.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from (FILM 200-299, PASI 200-399)

Not offered in 2020

FILM 304 – Film Cultures B

This course is an advanced study of a film culture or linked film cultures that are fostered through shared production, distribution and exhibition practices and that emerge from particular cultural or subcultural contexts. It explores the relationship of film and culture across national/transnational or cross-cultural frames.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 233, 333 in 2011-13

1/3 • CRN 26096 • Mon 10-1pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn]

FILM 305 – Cinemedia

This course examines the relationships between cinema and other media in a variety of contexts. Topics may include analogue and/or digital technologies, animation, 3D, and/or multiple platforms. In 2019 it will focus on the way new media technologies have encouraged a range of DIY filmmaking forms. FILM 305 will explore new production modes (mobile phone filmmaking, Vine, Machinima, mash-ups) and exhibition platforms (YouTube, Vimeo, Facebook, Tumblr).

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts

Not offered in 2020

FILM 306 – The Art of Film

This course examines the artistic dimensions of cinema at an advanced level. It may focus on specific film styles, aspects of the medium, individual directors, avant-garde and experimental cinema, or historical trends. In 2018 the course will examine Film Studies debates about post-classical Hollywood cinema. it will consider topics such as intensified continuity, complex narratives, and stylistic excess alongside key filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, Michael Mann, Kathryn Bigelow and Tony Scott.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 238

Not offered in 2020

FILM 307 – Film Institutions, Industries, and Cultures

The course focuses on the field of film in its cultural, institutional and industrial contexts. This may include consideration of cinema as industry; the cultures and practices of film and related creative industries; or the role and influence of cultural policies and institutions. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts

Not offered in 2020

FILM 308 – Contemporary Debates in Cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand

This course involves an advanced study of the cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand with an emphasis on contemporary critical debates.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts

1/3 • CRN 26100 • Tue 11-2pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn]

FILM 310 – Short Film Production

This course involves a practical study of the creative and technical aspects of film production. Students will make a short dramatic film in small groups. This will develop their skills at scripting, photography, mise-en-scene, performance, editing, sound recording and mixing. Please note that in order to be considered for this limited entry course, your enrolment application must be submitted by 1 December in the year prior to enrolment.

30 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 332

2/3 • CRN 26083 • ^ Tue 3-6pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FILM 311 – Documentary Film Production

A critical and practical study of documentary filmmaking. Documentary Film Production aims to provide students with a broad understanding of the forms and styles of documentary. The course will focus on stylistic and structural aspects of the documentary form as a basis from which to inform the productions produced within the class. Please note that in order to be considered for this limited entry course, your enrolment application must be submitted by 1 December in the year prior to enrolment.

30 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 335

1/3 • CRN 26084 • ^ Wed 10-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FILM 320 – Special Topic: Suggestive and Psychological Horror

The horror genre does not always involve monstrosity nor employ graphic violence to produce strong audience responses. This course will focus on those suggestive and psychological horror films that create states such as anxiety, suspense, dread, and paranoia. It will examine the aesthetic, emotional, philosophical, social and cultural dimensions of this subgenre. Topics may include the Val Lewton cycle, Roger Corman’s Poe adaptations, female ‘gaslighting’ films, the ghost film, contemporary J-horror, and the serial killer film.

20 pts • (P) 40 points from FILM 200-299

2/3 • CRN 26101 • Mon 1-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn]

Finance

FINA 101 – Finance for Business

An introduction to the principles of finance and their application to issues facing businesses and individual investors. Extensive use will be made of spreadsheets.

15 pts • (X) FINA 201, 202, 211

2/3 • CRN 18307 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

FINA 101 – Finance for Business

An introduction to the principles of finance and their application to issues facing businesses and individual investors. Extensive use will be made of spreadsheets.

15 pts • (X) FINA 201, 202, 211

FINA 201 – Introduction to Corporate Finance

An introduction to the fundamental concepts in corporate finance. Topics include the net present value method, alternative investment rules, capital budgeting, and the theories of capital structure.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 141 (or 140), QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151); (X) FINA 211

1/3 • CRN 18176 • Tue, Thu 8.30-9.30 [Pipitea]

3/3 • CRN 18601 • Mon 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea], Wed, Fri 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 201 – Introduction to Corporate Finance

An introduction to the fundamental concepts in corporate finance. Topics include the net present value method, alternative investment rules, capital budgeting, and the theories of capital structure.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 141 (or 140), QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151); (X) FINA 211

FINA 202 – Introduction to Investments

An introduction to the institutions, markets and instruments of the financial system, as well as the theory and practice of asset valuation and portfolio selection.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 141 (or 140), QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 18177 • Tue 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 202 – Introduction to Investments

An introduction to the institutions, markets and instruments of the financial system, as well as the theory and practice of asset valuation and portfolio selection.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 141 (or 140), QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

FINA 203 – Applied Finance

This course applies finance theories to problems involving corporate and personal financial decision making, and the principles of valuation to common situations. Extensive use will be made of spreadsheets.

15 pts • (P) FINA 101 or 201 or 211

Not offered in 2020

FINA 203 – Applied Finance

This course applies finance theories to problems involving corporate and personal financial decision making, and the principles of valuation to common situations. Extensive use will be made of spreadsheets.

15 pts • (P) FINA 101 or 201 or 211

Not offered in 2020

FINA 211 – Corporate Finance for Accounting and Business

An introduction to the fundamental concepts in corporate finance for accounting and business. Topics include net present value, alternative investment rules, capital budgeting, capital structure and long-term financing.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); (X) FINA 201

1/3 • CRN 27048 • Tue, Thu 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

FINA 211 – Corporate Finance for Accounting and Business

An introduction to the fundamental concepts in corporate finance for accounting and business. Topics include net present value, alternative investment rules, capital budgeting, capital structure and long-term financing.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); (X) FINA 201

FINA 301 – Corporate Finance

Significant aspects of financial decision making by firms, including capital structure, capital budgeting, and dividend decisions. The primary focus will be upon normative theory, i.e. decisions that maximise the market value of the firm.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) MOFI 301

1/3 • CRN 18053 • Mon, Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 301 – Corporate Finance

Significant aspects of financial decision making by firms, including capital structure, capital budgeting, and dividend decisions. The primary focus will be upon normative theory, i.e. decisions that maximise the market value of the firm.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) MOFI 301

FINA 302 – International Corporate Finance

This course examines exchange rate behaviour and the implications for corporate financial management. Topics include modelling exchange rate behaviour; foreign exchange risk management, with applications to international debt raising, financial management, and hedging exchange rate risk; and international portfolio choice.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201

Not offered in 2020

FINA 302 – International Corporate Finance

This course examines exchange rate behaviour and the implications for corporate financial management. Topics include modelling exchange rate behaviour; foreign exchange risk management, with applications to international debt raising, financial management, and hedging exchange rate risk; and international portfolio choice.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201

Not offered in 2020

FINA 303 – Derivatives

This course covers options, forward contracts, futures contracts, and other common derivative contracts. Topics include how these contracts work, how they are used, and how they are priced.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) QUAN 371

2/3 • CRN 18055 • Mon 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea], Wed 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

FINA 303 – Derivatives

This course covers options, forward contracts, futures contracts, and other common derivative contracts. Topics include how these contracts work, how they are used, and how they are priced.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) QUAN 371

FINA 304 – Financial Econometrics

This course develops tools for analysing financial time series and estimating and testing simple financial models, including: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, and generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic (GARCH) models.

15 pts • (P) FINA 202, QUAN201/203 (or MATH 277); (X) QUAN 304

2/3 • CRN 18056 • Tue, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 304 – Financial Econometrics

This course develops tools for analysing financial time series and estimating and testing simple financial models, including: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, and generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic (GARCH) models.

15 pts • (P) FINA 202, QUAN201/203 (or MATH 277); (X) QUAN 304

FINA 305 – Investments

This course examines the problem of portfolio management confronted by individuals and pension plans. Topics covered include preferences for risk, valuation of stocks, portfolio allocation, and an introduction to derivative pricing. The course aims to provide students with the tools necessary to work in this area, along with a solid grounding in the financial theory behind the models used.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) MOFI 305

2/3 • CRN 18057 • (L1) Tue, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

2/3 • CRN 30188 • (L2) Tue 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 305 – Investments

This course examines the problem of portfolio management confronted by individuals and pension plans. Topics covered include preferences for risk, valuation of stocks, portfolio allocation, and an introduction to derivative pricing. The course aims to provide students with the tools necessary to work in this area, along with a solid grounding in the financial theory behind the models used.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) MOFI 305

FINA 306 – Financial Economics

This course bridges the gap between undergraduate and honours-level study in economics and finance. It reinforces and extends the theoretical basis of decision making as it applies to asset pricing and corporate finance. It is intended for students who have an interest in pursuing honours-level study in economics and finance at VUW.

15 pts • (P) B or better in ECON 201; QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 18178 • Mon, Tue 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

FINA 306 – Financial Economics

This course bridges the gap between undergraduate and honours-level study in economics and finance. It reinforces and extends the theoretical basis of decision making as it applies to asset pricing and corporate finance. It is intended for students who have an interest in pursuing honours-level study in economics and finance at VUW.

15 pts • (P) B or better in ECON 201; QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

FINA 307 – Risk Management and Insurance

Selected topics in risk management, banking and insurance; the use of financial and insurance markets to transfer and share risk; financial risk management case studies; regulation of finance, banking and insurance markets; recent developments in financial markets.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201/202/203/211; (X) QUAN 371

Not offered in 2020

FINA 307 – Risk Management and Insurance

Selected topics in risk management, banking and insurance; the use of financial and insurance markets to transfer and share risk; financial risk management case studies; regulation of finance, banking and insurance markets; recent developments in financial markets.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201/202/203/211; (X) QUAN 371

Not offered in 2020

FINA 308 – Financial Institutions Management

Issues involved in managing the risks associated with running financial institutions. Topics include the identification, measurement and management of credit risk, interest rate, liquidity and foreign exchange risk; capital adequacy regimes; other operational requirements for financial institutions.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201/202/203/211

Not offered in 2020

FINA 308 – Financial Institutions Management

Issues involved in managing the risks associated with running financial institutions. Topics include the identification, measurement and management of credit risk, interest rate, liquidity and foreign exchange risk; capital adequacy regimes; other operational requirements for financial institutions.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201/202/203/211

Not offered in 2020

FINA 350 – Special Topic: Behavioural Finance

The traditional framework for thinking about financial markets assumes that all market participants are fully rational. However, a recently emerging paradigm, behavioural finance, argues that many financial phenomena are the result of less than fully rational thinking. This course revisits basic topics in finance from a behavioural finance perspective.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, FINA 202

1/3 • CRN 25123 • Mon, Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 350 – Special Topic: Behavioural Finance

The traditional framework for thinking about financial markets assumes that all market participants are fully rational. However, a recently emerging paradigm, behavioural finance, argues that many financial phenomena are the result of less than fully rational thinking. This course revisits basic topics in finance from a behavioural finance perspective.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, FINA 202

FINA 351 – Special Topic: New Zealand Financial System

The financial system plays a key role in the New Zealand economy, facilitating the intermediation of savings and investment, transactions and risk management. The course aims to give an understanding of the New Zealand financial system, its functions, structure, current trends and the regulatory framework. The course also reviews the influence of the financial system on the real economy.

15 pts • (P) FINA 202

1/3 • CRN 25124 • Thu 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea], Fri 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

FINA 351 – Special Topic: New Zealand Financial System

The financial system plays a key role in the New Zealand economy, facilitating the intermediation of savings and investment, transactions and risk management. The course aims to give an understanding of the New Zealand financial system, its functions, structure, current trends and the regulatory framework. The course also reviews the influence of the financial system on the real economy.

15 pts • (P) FINA 202

FINA 352 – Special Topic: Entrepreneurial Finance

Financial tools needed to start, build and exit a new venture. How and where to obtain financing to launch and develop a new business. Valuation and security design used by venture capatalists.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201 or FINA 211 or (FINA 101 and ACCY 130).

3/3 • CRN 25125 • Tue, Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 352 – Special Topic: Entrepreneurial Finance

Financial tools needed to start, build and exit a new venture. How and where to obtain financing to launch and develop a new business. Valuation and security design used by venture capatalists.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201 or FINA 211 or (FINA 101 and ACCY 130).

French

FHSS 110 – Exploring the World through Languages and Cultures

How do languages and cultures interrelate, and how can we read them in the world around us? This course provides students with insights into how languages and cultures shape and reflect identity by critically engaging with a wide variety of global texts and objects located in New Zealand’s capital city and beyond. Texts are studied in English translation.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

FREN 101 – French Language 1A

An intensive course designed for beginners and those with little prior knowledge of French, covering all four skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking. On completing this course, students will have gained knowledge of basic French grammar and vocabulary equivalent to proficiency level A1 in the Common European Framework, or to NCEA level 1.

20 pts • (X) FREN 112 or more than 14 credits at NCEA Level 2 or equivalent as determined by the Programme Director

1/3 • CRN 26113 • Mon, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

FREN 102 – French Language 1B

An intensive course that continues the work begun in FREN 101 in all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking. On completing this course, students will have knowledge of basic French grammar and understand a range of vocabulary approximately equivalent to level A2 in the Common European Framework, or to NCEA level 2; or NCEA Level 3 credits (with merit or excellence).

20 pts • (P) FREN 101 or more than 14 credits at NCEA Level 2; or NCEA level 3 credits (with achieved); (X) FREN 113

2/3 • CRN 26114 • Mon, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

FREN 104 – French Society and Culture

This is a French civilisation course which aims to provide students with a general knowledge of French geography, history, past and present culture and social and political issues. No knowledge of French is required. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts

Not offered in 2020

LANG 101 – Shaping the World: Cultural Forces in Europe and Latin America

This course introduces students to themes central to the study of the cultures of the French, German, Italian and Spanish-speaking worlds. Cultural case studies will allow students to draw out commonalities without losing sight of historical, political and socio-cultural specificities. The course is taught and assessed entirely in English.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 32066 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

FHSS 210 – Language Study Abroad

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 100-level points at Victoria. The course is available both to students who have studied the language before and to students with no previous knowledge of the language. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 100-level and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 28218 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FREN 201 – French Language 2A

This course builds on work done in FREN 102 in all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking. By the end of the course, students will have acquired a sound knowledge of French syntax and vocabulary approximately equivalent to level A2-B1 in the Common European Framework or to more than 20 credits at NCEA level 3 with merit or excellence.

20 pts • (P) FREN 102 (or 115) or 14 credits at NCEA Level 3 with merit or excellence

1/3 • CRN 26115 • Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

FREN 202 – French Language 2B

This course develops skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking to an intermediate level while preparing students for more advanced language learning. By the end of this course, students will acquire knowledge of French syntax and vocabulary approximately equivalent to level B1 in the Common European Framework.

20 pts • (P) FREN 201 (or 116) or more than 20 credits at NCEA level 3 with merit of excellence, or equivalent; (X) FREN 215

2/3 • CRN 26116 • Tue, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

FREN 221 – French Literary Studies

Selected 20th- and 21st-century texts studied in their social and historical context. The course will develop students' ability to write about these texts in a critical, informed and persuasive manner. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) FREN 102

Not offered in 2020

LANG 201 – Capital Cities: Their Cultures and Stories

A course that charts the physical and cultural landscapes of some of the world’s most exciting cities and explores the changing histories of their peoples. This course is recommended for all students interested in cultural exchange. It is taught entirely in English and fulfils major requirements for students of European Languages and Cultures.

20 pts • (P) 40 points

Not offered in 2020

LANG 202 – Moving the World: Artistic Movements in Context

This course introduces students to major artistic movements that represent key moments in the cultural histories of the French, German, Italian and Spanish-speaking worlds. Artefacts such as literary texts and art works will be studied in relation to historical and political contexts and prevailing intellectual currents in the source-language community. The course is taught and assessed entirely in English.

20 pts • (P) 40 points

2/3 • CRN 32067 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

FHSS 310 – Study Abroad for Language Students

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 points of relevant language acquisition courses at Victoria. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points of language study at 200-level or higher and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 25151 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FREN 301 – French Language 3A

This course extends work done in FREN 202 in all four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. By the end of this course, students will have acquired a sound knowledge of French grammar, syntax and vocabulary approximately equivalent to level B2 (part 1) in the Common European Framework.

20 pts • (P) FREN 202; (X) FREN 216

1/3 • CRN 26118 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

FREN 302 – French Language 3B

This course extends work done in FREN 301 in reading, writing, listening and speaking. By the end of this course, students will have attained an advanced level of skill in applying their knowledge of French grammar and vocabulary at a level approximately equivalent to level B2 (part 2) in the Common European Framework.

20 pts • (P) FREN 301 or 315; (X) FREN 316

2/3 • CRN 26119 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

FREN 331 – 19th & 20th-Century French Literature

This course aims to encourage critical reading and understanding of the prescribed texts with an emphasis on various critical approaches, and to develop students' ability to write about those texts in a critical, informed and persuasive manner.

20 pts • (P) FREN 202 (or 216), 221

Not offered in 2020

FREN 332 – 20th-Century French World Literature

This course aims to encourage critical reading and understanding of the prescribed texts and to develop students' ability to write about those texts in a critical, informed and persuasive manner. The texts studied deal for the most part with the experiences of people living in post-colonial society, and ways in which various forms of oppression affect them.

20 pts • (P) FREN 202 (or 216), 221

Not offered in 2020

FREN 333 – 17th and 18th-Century French Literature

Selected 17th and 18th century texts studied in their social and historical context.

20 pts • (P) FREN 202 (or 216), 221

2/3 • CRN 1570 • Mon, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

Gender and Sexuality Studies

ANTH 201 – Gender, Sexuality and Kinship

This course examines anthropological approaches to kinship, sexuality and gender. It will explore the shifting social norms surrounding gender, sexuality, the family and relatedness across diverse cultural settings. It will reveal how practices of gender, sexuality and kinship intersect with new reproductive technologies, media, nationalism, capitalism, colonisation, class and race.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further points from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 30010 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 211 – Myth and Storytelling

A study of the diverse functions of myth and storytelling in Greek and Roman literature and society, and the intersection of mythical and rational modes of thought.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 311

1/3 • CRN 6652 • Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

SACS 202 – Gender and Sexuality Studies: Key Thinkers and Perspectives

This course will examine the major influences on and developments in feminist theory and gender and sexuality studies up to the present day. Among the topics considered are: gender and sexual difference and diversity, sexual politics and sexuality, the relationships between gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity and class, and postmodernism and post-feminism. These topics are explored in a global and cross-cultural context, through close engagement with the writings of key thinkers in the field.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 25079 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SOSC 215 – Reproducing Gendered Bodies

This course will examine gender relations from a sociological perspective. It will draw on a variety of approaches and perspectives to examine key concepts, issues and themes in contemporary gender studies. Readings, lectures and tutorials will focus on a new topic each week. Topics will include: knowledge, experience, identity, sex, gender, embodiment, reproduction, intimacy, consumption, parenting, home, and work. This course may also be able to be taken towards a minor in SPOL or GNSX.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from SOSC 102-112; 20 points from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) SOSC 315, SPOL 215, 315

Not offered in 2020

SOSC 223 – Reflecting on Violence

This course familiarises students with social theories of violence and security in various contexts, paying particular attention to the gendered dynamics of violence. We consider topics such as state violence, torture, terrorism, sexual violence, violence toward children and intimate partner violence. We debate the ethical and methodological issues involved in researching violence and social policies aimed at reducing violence.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from SOSC 102-112 and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA schedule

1/3 • CRN 29126 • Fri 2-4pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 311 – Myth and Storytelling

A study of the diverse functions of myth and storytelling in Greek and Roman literature and society, and the intersection of mythical and rational modes of thought. Co-taught with CLAS 211: reading supplementary to that for CLAS 211 is required, and a deeper and more extensive knowledge of the subject is expected in in-term work and the final examination. Offered in alternate years. 50% internal assessment, 50% examination.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 211

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 313 – Women, Crime and Social Control

The study of women's involvement and experiences within the criminal justice system and its social control implications. Topics include women as offenders, women as victims, and women as criminal justice professionals.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

Not offered in 2020

CRIM 324 – Sexual Violence

This course is designed to introduce students to the issues and concepts central to an understanding of sexual violence. The focus of the course is on the study of adult rape/sexual assault and child sexual abuse. The course explores the causes, characteristics and consequences of sexual violence, examining issues for both the victims and offenders of these crimes. Topics covered may include theories of sexual offending, criminal justice system responses, victim impacts and survival, rape prevention, and offender treatment programmes.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from (ANTH, CRIM, HIST, LAWS, MDIA, PSYC, PUBL, SACS, SOSC or SPOL)

1/3 • CRN 18023 • (L1) ^ Thu 10-12 [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 30198 • (L2) Wed 10-12 [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FILM 302 – Cinema and Representation

This course examines how cinema represents issues such gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality and/or class in a critical manner. Topics will vary. In 2019 the course will focus on feminist, queer and transgender film criticism and cinemas. The course will introduce theories of representation and spectatorship central to feminist, queer and transgender film studies, survey their applications to a diverse set of films, and examine provocative depictions of sexuality, identity and society onscreen.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts or 40 PASI pts; (X) FILM 336

Not offered in 2020

GEOG 312 – Race, Gender and Development

This course explores the relationships between men, women and development around the world using contemporary ideas from feminist/cultural geography and development studies.

20 pts • (P) (GEOG 212, 20 further 200-level GEOG pts) or 40 approved 200-level pts

Not offered in 2020

MDIA 306 – Media, Gender and Sexuality

This course examines the representations, contexts, and politics of gender, sexuality and the media. By interrogating the discourses of gender and sexuality as they are 'mediated' in a variety of forms (including television, film, popular music, social media, advertising), we will examine the construction and disruption of categories of gender and sexual identity, and their intersection with other identity frameworks.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from MDIA 200–299

1/3 • CRN 10437 • Wed 3-5pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

POLS 362 – A Topic in Political Philosophy: Feminist Theory

This course enables students to engage deeply with a broad range of feminist thought. We will first focus on feminist critiques of social/political institutions, then on feminist prescriptions, and finally look at the means feminists have suggested for realising these solutions. Along the way, we will engage a myriad of controversies that have created schisms within feminist thought and practice. This course may also be able to be taken towards majors in INTP or PHIL. See major requirements for details.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from POLS or INTP 200–299; (X) PHIL 362

2/3 • CRN 1327 • Tue 1-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SOSC 315 – Reproducing Gendered Bodies

This course will examine gender relations from a sociological perspective. It will draw on a variety of approaches and perspectives to examine key concepts, issues and themes in contemporary gender studies. Readings, lectures and tutorials will focus on a new topic each week. Topics will include: knowledge, experience, identity, sex, gender, embodiment, reproduction, intimacy, consumption, parenting, home, and work. This course may also be able to be taken towards a minor in SPOL or GNSX.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from SACS 200–299, SOSC 200–299; (X) SOSC 215, SPOL 215, 315

Not offered in 2020

Geography

See also Physical Geography

GEOG 112 – Introduction to Human Geography and Development Studies

An introduction to the basic concepts and processes of human geography and development, using case studies from the Asia Pacific region and New Zealand's place within it.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 1651 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

GEOG 114 – Environment and Resources: the Foundations

This course integrates the physical, social, economic, and political factors associated with environmental change. First, the course introduces the earth systems associated with environmental change (both natural and human induced). Second, the course explore the social, political and economic implications of contemporary environmental issues and human-environment relations.

15 pts • (X) ENVI 114

1/3 • CRN 7021 • Tue, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 212 – Worlds of Development

An introduction to ideas, strategies and impacts of development from a global and geographical perspective. The course focuses on the concept of development and analyses the spatial pattern of global inequality. Processes of change in East Asia, Latin America, the Pacific Islands and Africa are compared and analysed.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 112 or approved course

1/3 • CRN 6002 • Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 214 – Environment and Resources: New Zealand Perspectives

This course examines major environmental issues and challenges New Zealand faces today. The course highlights policy and management frameworks in place to address these environmental issues. Students also critically appraise how well current policy and management mechanisms achieve the goal of environmental sustainability.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 114 or 15 approved points; (X) ENVI 214

2/3 • CRN 6004 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

GEOG 215 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Science

An introduction to the basic concepts of Geographic Information Systems and Science.

20 pts • (P) 60 100-level pts (X) GEOG 415

2/3 • CRN 6005 • Tue, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 216 – Urban Geography

This course explores the main concepts and applications associated with the study of contemporary urban geography.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 112, 15 approved 100-level pts

Not offered in 2020

GEOG 217 – Human Geography: Approaching Our World

This course explores the evolution of human geography and its relevance to local and global issues over time. We will explore and compare different human geography approaches to our world and apply them to various spheres of human geography (e.g. nature, economics, politics). Students will be introduced to key ideas, concepts and thinkers of the discipline over time.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 112; ENVI/GEOG 114 or 15 approved 100-level pts

2/3 • CRN 26056 • Mon, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 220 – Hydrology and Climate

This course provides the skills and training necessary to explore and understand the core hydrological and climatic processes that cause change within the environment, particularly the role of water. It will help you to understand why climate varies spatially, and why vegetation has such an important influence on the availability and timing of moisture and stream flow. It will also examine how hydrological and climatic systems respond to human interaction and environmental change. The emphasis will be on providing the skills necessary to interpret the processes controlling the spatial and temporal variability in climate and water availability.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 114, ESCI/GEOG 111, 15 100-level MATH or STAT points

2/3 • CRN 17169 • Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 222 – Ecology and Environment

An introduction to ecology and environmental science. The course focuses on physical and biological processes in terrestrial environments. The field trip will introduce techniques relevant to field-based enquiry in geography, ecological and environmental science. Also taught as BIOL 222.

20 pts • (P) STAT 193, 30 pts from (BIOL 111, 113, 114, 132, ENVI/GEOG 114, ESCI/GEOG 111, ESCI 112) (X) BIOL/ENVI 222

1/3 • CRN 26059 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 224 – Geomorphology

The course describes geomorphic processes and the landforms created by them. It will include a comprehensive review of the major processes shaping planetary surfaces by water, wind and ice. These concepts will be illustrated using case studies from Earth and other terrestrial planets.

20 pts • (P) ESCI/GEOG 111, 15 points from (MATH 132-177, PHYS 131, STAT 193, STAT 292)

1/3 • CRN 26054 • Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

SCIE 212 – To be confirmed

15 pts

Not offered in 2020

GEOG 312 – Race, Gender and Development

This course explores the relationships between men, women and development around the world using contemporary ideas from feminist/cultural geography and development studies.

20 pts • (P) (GEOG 212, 20 further 200-level GEOG pts) or 40 approved 200-level pts

Not offered in 2020

GEOG 313 – Geographies of New Zealand

GEOG 313 studies human geographies of New Zealand, including demography, historical geography, political economy, economic geography, industrial geography, rural geography, social geography and urban geography, in both historical and contemporary settings. For final year students it will advance their knowledge of contemporary geographical processes in the New Zealand environment. For foreign, exchange or graduate students it will give them an advanced introduction to geographical context of the country in which they are studying. Lecture and field trip dates are to be confirmed.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level GEOG pts or approved courses for non-GEOG majors (X) GEOG 311

3/3 • CRN 18579 • [Kelburn]

GEOG 314 – Advanced Environment and Resources: Global Issues

Building on GEOG 114 and 214 this course takes a global perspective to explore: pressures on resources that result from a global economy; cultural, societal and historical influences that shape how we value, use and manipulate resources and the environment; interdisciplinary approaches to addressing contemporary environmental problems.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 214 (X) ENVI 314

2/3 • CRN 6011 • Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

GEOG 315 – Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

The further development of GIS theory and applications.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 215, 20 further approved 200-level pts

2/3 • CRN 6012 • Tue, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 316 – Geographies of Globalisation

An analysis of the nature and impacts of globalisation from a geographical perspective. This course questions the concept of globalisation and focuses on the economic, cultural and environmental implications of the process in both developed and developing countries.

20 pts • (P) (GEOG 212, 20 further 200-level GEOG pts) or 40 approved 200-level pts

2/3 • CRN 6013 • Mon, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn]

GEOG 318 – Quaternary Environmental Change

New Zealand is well-endowed with a diverse array of sedimentary deposits and landforms of Quaternary-age that record significant climatic and environmental variability over time. This course aims to investigate these New Zealand Quaternary records, and to find out why these records are of global significance.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/GEOG 222, one of (GEOG 220, 224)

1/3 • CRN 7517 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

GEOG 319 – Applied Geomorphology

This course will explore the operations and, where appropriate, the management of key landform systems. The course provides a detailed synthesis of the physical processes and linkages operating at the earth's surface that shape our landscape and physical environment. These processes will be explored through a range of topics that may include the geomorphology of coasts, tectonic regions, glacial environments and fluvial systems.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 224, one of (GEOG 220, BIOL/GEOG 222); 15 further pts from MATH 132-177, PHYS 131 or (STAT 193 or equivalent) not previously taken

1/3 • CRN 7518 • Mon, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

GEOG 321 – Ice and Climate

An overview of the climate system and the cryosphere, focussing on interactions between the two, covering (1) comprehensive treatment of climate processes over the 2000 years leading into the modern era of anthropogenic influence; (2) case studies of ice-climate interactions; recent behaviour of ice sheets, mountain glaciers and sea ice.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 220, one of (BIOL/GEOG 222, GEOG 223, 224); 15 further pts from MATH 132-177, PHYS 131 or (STAT 193 or equivalent) not previously taken

2/3 • CRN 26057 • Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

GEOG 322 – Islands and Oceans: People, Power and Place

This course examines a range of issues relevant to island and ocean geographies in (post) colonial contexts – such as climate change, forced migration, militarization, biodiversity, the blue economy – through relevant geographic theories including material geographies, political geographies, more-than-human geographies, and feminist geographies. In doing so, it builds on geographic concepts of region, scale, scarcity, boundaries, marginality and identity. Case studies will largely be drawn from the wider Pacific region, including Aotearoa/New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points from ANTH, DEVE, ENVI, GEOG, MAOR, PASI or POLS

1/3 • CRN 31090 • Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 324 – Research Design

This course teaches different approaches and methods to research design. Students develop a group research proposal for a potential project.

10 pts • (P) 40 ENVI or GEOG 200-level pts, or 40 approved 200-level pts; STAT 193 or equivalent

1/3 • CRN 26058 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 325 – Field Methods

This course engages students in practical fieldwork and research methods commonly used in Geography and Physical Geography. Working in teams, students will grapple with a range of data generation and analysis methods in order to be able to clearly present their research understandings in both oral and written forms.

10 pts • (P) GEOG 324

2/3 • CRN 26055 • Tue 2-4pm [Kelburn]

Geology

ESCI 111 – The Earth System: An Introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Sciences

An introduction to fundamental concepts in Physical Geography and Earth Sciences. The physical processes that shape and have shaped the Earth are the focus of this course. An important emphasis is on human interaction with the environment. This course provides fundamental knowledge for understanding our environment and a platform for further study. Field work in the Wellington area is included.

15 pts • (X) GEOG 111 (D) GEOG 111

1/3 • CRN 9469 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 112 – Fundamentals of Geology

An introduction to geology, Earth and planetary history, rock forming processes and geological time through the study of minerals, fossils, rocks and geological maps.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 15147 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 132 – Antarctica: Unfreezing the Continent

A broad introduction to Antarctica, including its history, exploration, weather, geology, fauna and management. Its role in the global climate system is emphasised. This course is primarily designed for non-science majors.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 9062 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 201 – Climate Change and New Zealand's Future

The Climate Change Research Institute in conjunction with the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences is offering this summer course. Designed for science and non-science students, this course provides a summary of current knowledge on climate change, the evidence and its uncertainties, and possible climate scenarios for the next 50 to 500 years. The course also discusses the influence of climate change on NZ’s society, economy and environment, and governmental strategies for adaptation and mitigation. The course is taught by staff from VUW, NIWA (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited), Ministry of the Environment, and Public Policy Research.

20 pts • (P) 30 points

3/3 • CRN 11341 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 202 – Sedimentology and Palaeontology

An introduction to features of sedimentary strata and fossils that form the basis for interpreting the geological history of a region from field observations and drill cores. The course includes flow channel studies of sediment movement in the laboratory, and a weekend field trip to gain experience in describing sedimentary strata and collecting fossils for subsequent study.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

1/3 • CRN 15137 • Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 203 – Earth Structures and Deformation

An introduction to the fields of structural geology, tectonics and solid earth geophysics with the goal of describing the structure of the earth and the mechanisms by which it deforms. The laboratory component emphasises modern field-based methods of collecting, processing and analysing geological and geophysical data.

20 pts • (P) (ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent) OR (ESCI 112 (or 111), MATH 142)

1/3 • CRN 15141 • Wed 1-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 204 – Petrology and Microscopy

This course examines all common major rock types and introduces crystallography as it pertains to optical mineralogy, with examples of a variety of common minerals and rocks in hand sample and under the microscope. The course covers the origins of common minerals and rocks and the conditions and processes that form them.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

2/3 • CRN 15138 • Tue, Thu 9-12 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 241 – Introductory Field Geology

An introduction to field techniques in geology held at the Geology department's field station at Onekaka, near Takaka, Northwest Nelson. In 2020 this field course is offered 22-29 February 2020, and/or 11-18 April 2020 (depending on enrolments/staff availability), and/or 18-25 April 2020 (also depending on enrolments/staff availability). Students will be instructed to sign up for one of these offerings.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent

block dates/3 • CRN 17287 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 301 – Global Change: Earth Processes and History

A study of modern and past Earth environments and the key processes that have shaped them. This course focuses on understanding and interpreting evidence from the geological record for environmental change and using this knowledge to help predict future variability, with specific focus on Antarctica, Southwest Pacific and New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 202; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further points from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193); (C) ESCI 341 or GEOG 323

1/3 • CRN 15139 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 302 – Tectonics and Structural Geology

An introduction to the fundamental concepts, principles and methods in global tectonics and structural geology. The laboratory part of the course emphasises practical methods of structural analysis and interpretation based on outcrop, microscopic and geophysical data sets. It includes two all-day field trips.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 203, 341, 342; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193); (X) ESCI 340

2/3 • CRN 15145 • Mon, Thu 12-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 303 – Petrology and Geochemistry

The course introduces fundamental concepts, principles and methods in geochemistry and the application of geochemical tools to geochronology, igneous, metamorphic rocks and processes. The formation, classification and geochemical behaviour of elements, isotopes and anaylytical methods in geochemistry. The application of geochemical tools is examined and the principles of geochronology applied.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 204; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 15140 • Mon, Fri 9-12 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 304 – Petroleum Geology

This course introduces all aspects of the composition, origin and accumulation of hydrocarbons and the main exploration procedures and analytical techniques. It covers concepts such as play and sequence stratigraphy, before focusing on more detailed aspects of reservoir and seal types. Types of petroleum accumulation are described, ranging from standard oil and gas, to unconventional accumulations such as gas hydrates and shale oil and gas. Carbon capture and storage are also introduced along with discussion of issues such as fracking and the future of oil and gas. Practical work comprises exercises that introduce petroleum analytical techniques and are designed to foster an understanding of how exploration proceeds.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 301; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

Not offered in 2020

ESCI 305 – Applied Geophysics

This course covers the use of geophysical data acquisition, processing and interpretation for exploring the Earth's interior. Topics include gravity, electrical and magnetic surveying and the fields of simple bodies, refraction seismology, reflection survey data interpretation, the use of GPS for surveying and geodesy, and the use of surface waves for determination of shear wave velocities for engineering and seismic hazard purposes.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 15146 • ^ Mon, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 341 – Sedimentary Field Geology

Field sedimentary mapping in the hills east of Martinborough, covering the basics of mapping sedimentary sequences in an area of simple deformation. A map, cross- section and stratigraphic columns are prepared and an environmental analysis of the section is produced in the field. Only one stream will be offered in 2020. This will run from 12-19 February 2020. Students will be required to attend a half-day workshop on 10 February 2020 in CO304.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 241; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 28413 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 342 – Structural Field Geology

Field mapping and analysis of geological structures, including folds, thrust and active strike-slip faults. Students measure structural data, produce maps and cross-sections of an area on the Kaikoura coast, South Island, which provides a dramatic window into the tectonic evolution of NZ's landmass over the last 100 million years. Only one stream will be offered in 2020. This will run from 21-28 February 2020. All students will be required to attend a half-day workshop on 31 January 2020.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 203, 241; 15 MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT pts or an approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-115, MATH 141-177, PHYS 114-115, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 15142 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 343 – Volcanic Field Geology

Methods and techniques for studying volcanic geology in the field. This course runs from Whakapapa in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) of the central North Island. It examines the products of andesite and basalt eruptions from the Tongariro National Park volcanoes and some rhyolitic products of Taupo volcano. The course takes place in the mid-trimeste