Accounting

ACCY 130 – Accounting for Accountability and Decision Making

The course covers the use and economic and social impact of internal and external accounting information.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 23001 • (L1) Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 23002 • (L2) Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 23003 • Tue, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ACCY 131 – Fundamentals of Accounting

This course covers the preparation, assurance, and analysis of internal and external accounting information.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 130 (X) ACCY 111, ACCY 115

2/3 • CRN 33409 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ACCY 223 – Accounting for Sustainable Decision Making and Control

Learn how to use an organisation's internal information for making decisions about costing and planning for a sustainable future. Discover how to analyse internal data and how to use it for performance evaluation and organisational and cost control.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 131 (or ACCY 115)

1/3 • CRN 15970 • Wed 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea], Fri 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 225 – Accounting Technology and Systems Management

Learn how organisations use existing and emerging technologies to manage their accounting systems and business processes. Discover how data and information is stored, managed and analysed and understand the role of accountants in this systems environment.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 131 (or ACCY 115)

2/3 • CRN 18776 • Mon, Wed 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

lab, tut tba

ACCY 231 – International External Reporting and Business Sustainability

Learn to analyse financial statements of leading international firms and government agencies. Understand what firms should report in their annual reports to inform investors, banks, and creditors. Analyse big financial data and explore environmental, social, and governance reporting.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 131 (or ACCY 115)

1/3 • CRN 13069 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea], Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 302 – Accounting for Strategy, Performance, and Value

Learn how to use an organisation's strategic environmental and internal information to add customer, supplier and organisational value for a sustainable future. Find out how to account for strategy using value chain analysis, and to account for sustainability and lean management. Discover how to analyse data to guide capital investment and other decision-making and how to use it for strategic performance measurement, evaluation and management.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 223

2/3 • CRN 213 • Tue, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 306 – Data Analytics for Financial Statements

A critical examination of accounting and finance concepts as applied to financial statements of firms, focusing on the interests of equity investors. The course will also consider the value of financial statement analysis to capital markets and communities.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 231, FINA 201 (or FINA 211)

2/3 • CRN 220 • Mon 12.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 307 – Public Sector Accounting and Finance

The theoretical basis of government accounting; budgetary theory; the budgetary system of New Zealand government, accounting for local authorities and public enterprise.

15 pts • (P) 15 200-level ACCY pts

Not offered in 2024

ACCY 308 – External Reporting and Accountability

Current issues in financial accounting and reporting; alternative measurement bases from accounting and economics; the traditional framework of financial statements and other means of reporting.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 231

1/3 • CRN 15424 • Thu 9.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

ACCY 314 – Sustainability and Accountability

The study of accounting in a social and political context. Topics include accounting and the environment, ethics, industrial relations, social responsibility and philosophy.

15 pts • (P) 15 200-level ACCY pts or (ACCY 130 and one of MGMT 210, 211)

1/3 • CRN 233 • Thu 12.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

ACCY 320 – ST: Acctg for Strategy, Performance, and Value

Advanced and in-depth analysis of selected topics in cost and management accounting.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 223 and Permission of Head of School; (X) ACCY 302

Not offered in 2024

ACCY 330 – Auditing

Concepts and practice of auditing.

15 pts • (P) ACCY 231, COML 204

2/3 • CRN 19736 • Tue, Thu 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

SIDN 390 – Design for Social Innovation Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako

Within Agents of Change students create solutions that can impact positive social, cultural, political, economic and/or environmental change. Students use design tools, research methodologies and emergent co- design practices to design prototypes, and communicate and analyse design interventions that offer transitional pathways towards positive change. Students engage with diverse guiding values, including mana and manaaki, (respect and care) alongside whakawhanaungatanga (generation of authentic connections), to impact social awareness and/or change.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371 and 60 200-level pts including DSDN 242 or SIDN 242 and SIDN 272

2/3 • CRN 32122 • ^ Mon, Thu 3.30-6pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Actuarial Science

ACTS 201 – Financial Mathematics

Mathematical principles of compound interest, geometric series and annuities; valuation of loans; returns on financial transactions; duration and immunisation theory; term structure of interest rates; stochastic interest rates.

15 pts • (P) QUAN 102 (or STAT 193 or MATH 177), QUAN 111 (or MATH 141/142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 29082 • Tue 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea], Thu 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

ACTS 301 – Actuarial Science

This is a capstone course for the Actuarial Science major that brings together skills and knowledge from prior courses to develop an understanding of their practical application in the actuarial profession. It provides grounding in the mathematical techniques that can be used to model risks and contingencies.

15 pts • (P) ACTS 201, ECON 141, (MATH 277 or QUAN 203)

2/3 • CRN 27135 • Tue, Wed, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

ACTS 336 – General Insurance Techniques

This course provides the mathematical foundation necessary to set premiums and reserves for general insurance contracts. It provides an overview of the various techniques used in general insurance, including loss distributions, ruin theory, credibility, run-off triangles and general insurance modelling.

15 pts • (P) MATH 277 (or QUAN 203)

2/3 • CRN 31125 • Tue, Thu, Fri 8.30-9.30 [Pipitea]

STAT 335 – Statistical Models for Actuarial Science

This course introduces a range of models used in actuarial science, including Markov chains, Markov processes and transition, survival models and estimation with graduation methods and binomial models for mortality.

15 pts • (P) MATH 277

2/3 • CRN 27136 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

Animation and Visual Effects

DSDN 101 – Design Visualisation / Pohewatanga ā-Hoahoa

This course will use a range of visualisation methods to represent design concepts and elements. Methods used include hand drawing, photography, motion graphics, animation and video.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17120 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 102 – Game, Animation and Motion Design / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu, ā-Pakiwaituhi, ā-Ranga

This course will introduce students to basic principles of game design, animation and motion design. Fundamental game design concepts, such as mechanics and loops, will be explored and analysed to enable students to conceptualise and develop playable games. Alongside game design this course also introduces introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery and graphic animation.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 34100 • [Te Aro]

DSDN 103 – Critical Approaches to Design Communication/ Tukanga Arohaehae Kōrero ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to the role of visual and written communication in contemporary design practice. A range of techniques will be taught to help students communicate design concepts, critical thinking, and design processes to develop and clearly articulate their creative ideas and observations.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 34118 • Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 104 – Digital Fabrication / Waihanga Matihiko

In this course students engage with emerging technologies to visualise and create 3D forms, bodies and spaces. Students address the distinctive features of creating form and making digitally fabricated artefacts.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17152 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 111 – Design Composition / Hanganga ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to, and develops their fluency in, design vocabularies and composition specific to the configuration of design elements. Analogue and digital techniques are used to explore body, space, form and movement.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17123 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 132 – Design Narratives and Visual Storytelling / Paki ā-Hoahoa me te Pakiwaitara ā-Ataata

This course introduces students to narratives and storytelling in the context of visual design. Students will be exposed to a range of traditional and contemporary examples including Māori storytelling practice and examples from film, animation, digital and physical games and comics. Students will explore and apply the principles, structures and techniques introduced in class through linear and non-linear storytelling exercises.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

2/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 141 – Design Mediums and Processes / Ngā Huarahi me Ngā Tukanga ā-Hoahoa

This course focuses on creative exploration of materials and processes. Students will learn various manual and digital techniques and apply these to the exploration and production of expressive forms.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17126 • Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding and AI I / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding and AI for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design and Photography / Hoahoa Whakanikoniko me te Whakaahuatanga

This course explores the basics of graphic design and photography through hands-on projects. Students are introduced to professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of visual works that express visual identity and voice.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30061 • Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 33344 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 153 – Fashion Systems and Ecologies / Pūnaha me te Hauropi ā-Kākahu

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Tue 1.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 171 – Design in a Global Context / Hoahoa i te Horopaki o te Ao Whānui

By observing and analysing historical approaches and responses in and between cultures and design, students will explore design from a place-based perspective.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17129 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Wed 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31178 • [Distance]

DSDN 172 – Whakapapa Design I

This course is deeply rooted in Māori culture. Whakapapa Design emphasises ethical behaviour and the consequences of our actions as designers. Whakapapa Design highlights interconnections between people, place, and all living entities and offers a path to restore the health and well-being of both people and the planet through narrative, making, language, and shared values. Whakapapa Design is guided by the Māori tikanga; whakawhanaungatanga and manaakitanga.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30062 • Mon 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 201 – Animation and Visual Effects I / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata I

This course explores 3D design principles unique to creating animation and visual effects media. Students will create a series of digital artefacts for the screen. Tutorials cover development methods specific to digital content, with emphasis on fundamental principles and effective design process. In lab sessions students will use 3D modelling software and 2D image manipulation software to generate compelling and innovative visual imagery that demonstrates an understanding of animation and visual effects media.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the ANFX major

1/3 • CRN 31161 • ^ Mon, Wed 2.30-4pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 211 – Character Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Kiripuaki I

This course offers an introduction to animated storytelling through the art of character animation. We survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, from large scale studio features to experimental auteur films. In response students will create their own animated films by designing, building and rigging characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students will gain insight into animated film production workflows and will acquire the technical skills to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts including DSDN 102 (DSDN 132 prior to 2024) and 15 further pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 31162 • ^ Fri 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 221 – Digital 2D Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua I

This course introduces digital 2D and frame-by-frame techniques in modern animation practice. Historical and contemporary examples will be studied including classic feature films, independent shorts, music videos, and video games. Students will apply basic animation principles and learn introductory 2D techniques within a digital workflow, suitable to professional or personal practice.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses

2/3 • CRN 32097 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 241 – Visual Narratives / Ngā Paki Ataata

This course focuses on the structure and methods of effective storytelling, as expressed visually. Readings provide a broad survey of stories that employ visual narratives in innovative or instructive ways. Techniques are drawn from comics, books, graphic novels, film, children's books, and animation.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 45 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 33125 • ^ Tue 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 261 – Motion Design I / Hoahoa ā-Nekehanga I

This course introduces basic concepts of motion design and time-based media in communication and graphic environments. Topics covered include introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery, graphic animation, as well as creative strategies and workflow. Students will apply concepts from motion design to time-based projects and outputs.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI schedule

2/3 • CRN 32098 • ^ Mon 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

Not offered in 2024

ANFX 301 – Animation and Visual Effects II / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata II

This trimester 1 course is the pre-production for students' Capstone Project in Trimester 2. Students are exposed to concepts and precedents relating to production, pitching and storytelling, and apply these to their own pitch and project development.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 201

1/3 • CRN 32002 • Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 302 – Introduction to Technical Effects and Simulation

This course is an introduction to to essential concepts and practices technical artists employ when creating effects shots for screen roduction. Typical applications include film and games, but students may also find the course useful for exploring novel approaches to motion graphics, scientific visualisation or architectural studies. Example topics will include particle systems, fire/smoke simulation and rigid body dynamics (RBD) with the integration of digital assets and environments. 

15 pts • (P) 45 pts at 200 or 300 level from ANFX, GAME, CGRA (X) DSDN 383 in 2023

Not offered in 2024

ANFX 311 – Character Animation II / Pakiwaituhi ā-Kiripuaki II

This course builds on Character Animation I and examines the art of character animation in depth. Students survey a range of animated film across genres and styles, with a focus on contemporary animation. Students will design, build, and rig characters, and bring these to life on the screen. Students will refine their technical skills and deepen their understanding of animation film production workflows in order to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 211

1/3 • CRN 32003 • Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 321 – Digital 2D Animation II/Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua II

This course expands upon the practice of digital 2D and frame-by-frame animation in digital workflow. Students will learn intermediate animation principles and techniques for digital 2D production and its effective synthesis with other forms of animation and moving image. In addition to hands-on animation practice in the studio, students will watch, analyse, and discuss examples from a variety of contemporary sources, including film, music videos, and games.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 221

2/3 • CRN 33218 • ^ Tue 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 390 – Animation and Visual Effects Capstone/ Whakatinana ā-Wheako: Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata

The capstone project represents the culmination of study in the Animation and Visual Effects major. Students are offered the freedom to further develop any of the skills, concepts and approaches learnt from other courses. The course will engage the industry through a combination of guest lecture, brief development, and critique. The course focuses on portfolio and professional development.

30 pts • (P) ANFX 301, DSDN 371, and acceptance into the ANFX major (X) ANFX 312

2/3 • CRN 33213 • Mon, Wed 3.30-6pm [Te Aro]

COMD 331 – Concept Art and World Building / Toi Ariā me te Waihanga ā-Ao

In this course students will use a variety of techniques to craft concepts and visual images that convey speculative or fictional worlds. Contemporary and historical approaches to concept art will be critically analysed. World building across media (illustration, graphic novels, film, animation, books, and games) will be explored through examples and exercises.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM/THEA/WRIT courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

MDDN 314 – Audio-Visual Space / Whaitua Ataata-Rongo

Students will investigate processes and strategies involved in the production of time-based media, including audio recording, editing and manipulation techniques. Revolving around the topic of audio-visual space, course projects will allow students to explore the psychology of perception and concepts of spatiality within audio and video design.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 19914 • ^ Mon, Fri 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Antarctic Research Centre

See also School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences

ESCI 111 – The Earth System: Understanding our Dynamic Earth and Environment

ESCI 111 introduces students to the Earth system. It covers the physical processes that shape the Earth and environment. It emphasises how humans interact with the environment, especially around key issues such as climate change and sea level rise, natural hazards and resource use. It provides a platform for further study in Geography, Earth and Environmental sciences and includes fieldwork in the Wellington Region.

15 pts • (X) GEOG 111 (D) GEOG 111

1/3 • CRN 9469 • Mon, Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 112 – Earth Science for a Changing Planet

ESCI 112 teaches the foundations of Earth Science, necessary for understanding and mitigating climate change and natural hazards, including sea-level rise, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In addition, the course covers environmentally responsible management of natural resources such as groundwater and minerals. As part of the course, students go into the field and develop practical skills to better understand and interpret their physical environment.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 15147 • Mon, Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 132 – Antarctica: Unfreezing the Continent

A broad introduction to Antarctica, including its history, exploration, weather, geology, fauna and management. Its role in the global climate system is emphasised. This course is primarily designed for non-science majors.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 9062 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 201 – Climate Change and New Zealand's Future

The Antarctic Research Centre is offering this summer course. Designed for science and non-science students, this course provides a summary of current knowledge on climate change, the evidence and its uncertainties, and possible climate scenarios for the next 50 to 100 years. The course also discusses the influence of climate change on NZ’s society, economy and environment, and governmental strategies for adaptation and mitigation.

20 pts • (P) 30 points

3/3 • CRN 11341 • Wed 9-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 202 – Sedimentology and Palaeontology

An introduction to features of sedimentary strata and fossils that form the basis for interpreting the geological history of a region from field observations and drill cores. The course includes flow channel studies of sediment movement in the laboratory, and a weekend field trip to gain experience in describing sedimentary strata and collecting fossils for subsequent study.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent

1/3 • CRN 15137 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 203 – Earth Structures and Deformation

An introduction to the fields of structural geology, tectonics and solid earth geophysics with the goal of describing the structure of the earth and the mechanisms by which it deforms. The laboratory component emphasises modern field-based methods of collecting, processing and analysing geological and geophysical data.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent

1/3 • CRN 15141 • Mon, Wed 10-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 204 – Petrology and Microscopy

This course examines all common major rock types and introduces crystallography as it pertains to optical mineralogy, with examples of a variety of common minerals and rocks in hand sample and under the microscope. The course covers the origins of common minerals and rocks and the conditions and processes that form them.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent

2/3 • CRN 15138 • Tue, Fri 9-12 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 241 – Introductory Field Geology

An introduction to field techniques in geology held at the Geology department's field station at Onekaka, near Takaka, Northwest Nelson. The course trains students in basic methods of geological field mapping and provides training and experience in the presentation of geological field data through the construction of geological maps, stratigraphic columns and geological cross-sections. Students gain experience at describing and interpreting a wide variety of rock types and geological features in individual outcrops. Students will gain practice in interpreting the geological history of an area from their observations. Note the details of dates and arrangements in the Course Content below.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent

block dates/3 • CRN 17287 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 301 – Global Change: Earth Processes and History

A study of modern and past Earth environments and the key processes that have shaped them. This course focuses on understanding and interpreting evidence from the geological record for environmental change and using this knowledge to help predict future variability, with specific focus on Antarctica, Southwest Pacific and New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 202; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 15139 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 302 – Tectonics and Structural Geology

An introduction to the fundamental concepts, principles and methods in global tectonics and structural geology. The laboratory part of the course emphasises practical methods of structural analysis and interpretation based on outcrop, rock mechanics, geophysical, and remote sensing data sets. It includes two all-day field trips.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 203; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 15145 • Tue, Thu 3-6pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 303 – Petrology and Geochemistry

The course introduces fundamental concepts, principles and methods in geochemistry and the application of geochemical tools to geochronology, igneous, metamorphic rocks and processes. The formation, classification and geochemical behaviour of elements, isotopes and anaylytical methods in geochemistry. The application of geochemical tools is examined and the principles of geochronology applied.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 204; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-112, STAT 193)

Not offered in 2024

ESCI 305 – Environmental and Applied Geophysics

This course covers geophysical techniques to explore the subsurface, with applications to engineering, environmental and groundwater monitoring, seismic hazard assessment, exploration for energy and mineral resources, and other aspects of Earth structure. Topics include gravity, seismic, electrical, magnetic, and satellite-based surveying methods.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, SPCE 201, STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 15146 • ^ Mon, Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 12-4pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 341 – Sedimentary Field Geology

Field sedimentary mapping in the hills east of Martinborough, covering the basics of mapping sedimentary sequences in an area of simple deformation. A map, cross- section and stratigraphic columns are prepared and an environmental analysis of the section is produced in the field. Note the details of dates and arrangements in the Course Content below.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 241; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-112, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 15144 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 342 – Structural Field Geology

In this course, you will learn to recognise and describe active faults in the field. You will gain the ability to distinguish between ancient and active geological structures, gather and analyse structural data, quantify fault slip rates, and perform a natural hazard risk assessment.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 203, 241; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 15142 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 343 – Volcanic Field Geology

Methods and techniques for studying volcanic geology in the field. This course runs from Whakapapa in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) of the central North Island. It examines the products of andesite and basalt eruptions from the Tongariro National Park volcanoes and some rhyolitic products of Taupo volcano.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 204, 241; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 17289 • ^ [Kelburn]

lab, tut tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 344 – Field Geophysics

Methods and techniques for field geophysical surveys. This block course runs over a week, usually during the mid-trimester break, in a part of New Zealand that may vary from year to year. Students will learn how to apply several different techniques of environmental and geophysical methods to a single area and to integrate the results to answer a geophysical problem such as the shallow structure of a fault or a basin.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193) (C) ESCI 305

block dates/3 • CRN 17288 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 349 – Earth Sciences – International Field Course

This international field course in earth sciences aims to examine key geographical, geological and/or geophysical localities. The course will offer a variable but unique insight, understanding and experience of earth science in the field beyond that which already exists in New Zealand. This course is offered in alternate years and will run in the USA from 18 November 2019 to 18 December 2019. Numbers are limited, apply by 1 April 2019. An extra fee beyond that for the course, covering travel and subsistence costs applies and is to be met by the student.

20 pts • (P) 60 points of 200-level ESCI or GEOG including either ESCI 241 or GEOG 223; (X) ESCI 449

Not offered in 2024

Anthropology (Cultural)

ANTH 101 – Foundations of Society and Culture

This course introduces students to the subject by focusing on how anthropologists understand and explain social and cultural differences. We will explore a range of contemporary topics through a set of key questions that form the foundation of the discipline and are essential to both further study in Anthropology and an appreciation of world cultures.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 266 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 102 – Social and Cultural Diversity

This course introduces students to the study of social and cultural diversity by exploring culture and its role in our lives. Topics include ritual, symbolism, the body, exchange, belief, inequality, globalisation, kinship, gender and class. Case studies are drawn from New Zealand, the Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 267 • Tue, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 201 – Gender, Sexuality and Kinship

This course examines anthropological approaches to kinship, sexuality and gender. It will explore the shifting social norms surrounding gender, sexuality, the family and relatedness across diverse cultural settings. It will reveal how practices of gender, sexuality and kinship intersect with new reproductive technologies, media, nationalism, capitalism, colonisation, class and race.

20 pts • (P) 20 ANTH pts or GLBL 101 or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 30010 • Fri 1-3pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 202 – Capitalism, Culture, and Inequality

This course introduces topics in economic anthropology by examining the various. forms that capitalism takes within different cultural contexts, how it produces inequalities, and the varied ways that people and cultures respond to, appropriate and resist the economic systems of today's global world.

20 pts • (P) (ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule) or GLBL 101 (X) ANTH 215 in 2019-2020, ANTH 315 in 2017- 2018

2/3 • CRN 34075 • Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 204 – Modern Anthropological Thought

This course explores inspiring and influential ideas in recent Anthropology by discussing the writings of some of the discipline's greatest thinkers. Among the topics considered are: symbolism and the interpretation of cultures; culture and globalisation; ethnography and morality; culture and history; culture and evolution; culture and power; culture and experience.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 208 – Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development

This course will examine the cultural encounters and human experiences that emerge out of contemporary human rights regimes, humanitarian interventions, development projects, and global politics. Taking case studies from a range of different cultural settings, it will focus on how culture and politics shapes these global practices, and how different groups understand, respond to and challenge these interventions.

20 pts • (P) (ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule) or GLBL 101

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 209 – Conflict and Reconciliation

This course focuses on anthropological approaches to conflict and reconciliation, exploring the relationship between the two, and considering how we as anthropologists approach these topics at local, national, and international levels. These themes are addressed through material that examines societies in conflict, post-conflict peace-building, nationalism, and state building. The course will also examine theories of social suffering and studies that explore local interpretations of history, politics, violence, and power. A variety of ethnographies will be considered.

20 pts • (P) (ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule) or GLBL 101

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 210 – Environmental Anthropology

This course explores human relationships with ecological and material environments. It will examine diverse cultural perceptions of and approaches to the environment, the relationship between nature and culture, and anthropology’s contribution to contemporary ecological and climate debates.

20 pts • (P) (ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule) or GLBL 101

1/3 • CRN 29065 • Tue 2-4pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 213 – Ritual and Collective Life

How do communities give meaning and order to the world? What binds us together in collective relations with one another? This course offers an introduction to the anthropology of ritual. It will consider the ways rituals give order to social life, how they are used as public performances, how they generate political power, and how they are used to challenge established modes of living and being. The course examines a range of examples from New Zealand and beyond.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 13073 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 215 – Special Topic: Anthropology, Education and Social Change

This course applies anthropological insights and theories to ideas about education in different historical and cultural contexts. We will examine core issues in the anthropology of education (such as gender, race and class) to ask how and where people learn, what education does in different societies, why education is often linked with social change, and what role education has in our own lives.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102 or EDUC 223; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 13112 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 301 – Science, Technology and Culture

Science and technology are fundamental parts of all cultures. In this course, we examine how diverse sciences and technologies shape peoples’ interpretations of the world, their relations with one another, and their understandings of themselves. Considering issues like the relationship between indigenous knowledges and science, robotics, social media, medicine and biotechnology, and climate and environment, we ask what science is, how technology functions, and what place science and technology have in our own lives and societies.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ANTH 314 in 2018-2019

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 302 – Anthropology for Liberation

This course explores how Anthropology might contribute to human emancipation from racism, gender inequality, class disparities, and other forms of oppression and exploitation. We will consider what it means to approach anthropology from a decolonising perspective and explore what an anthropology for liberation might look like in theory and practice, drawing on examples from Asia, Oceania, and Latin America.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299 or GLBL 201 (X) ANTH 215 in 2017, ANTH 315 in 2019-2021

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 307 – Medical Anthropology

This course explores what roles our cultural beliefs and practices play in shaping our understandings of health, wellbeing, illness and medicine. We ask how culture mediates our experiences of our bodies, our emotions and diseases, and how local and global inequalities affect health outcome. The course takes a comparative approach, asking students to consider cultural approaches to disease categories, illness experiences, and systems of healing in their own societies and communities as well as in a range of globally diverse settings.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299 or GLBL 201

1/3 • CRN 27015 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ANTH 308 – Anthropology in Oceania

This course offers an in-depth exploration of the cultural diversity in Oceania by analysing the complex interplay between colonial encounters, postcolonial impacts, Indigenous epistemologies, and identity formation. We will explore these themes through the lens of the ocean, which has historically shaped connections, migration, trade, and cultural exchange within the region. Through a combination of theoretical discussions, case studies, ethnographic readings, and multimedia materials, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of how various colonial histories have influenced indigenous societies and and their ways of knowing, being, and relating.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299

2/3 • CRN 276 • Tue 10-12 [Kelburn]

seminar tba

ANTH 312 – Creative Ethnographic Practices

In this course we will explore some of the methodologies anthropologists use to collect and analyse data (including participant-observation, interviews, collaboration, visual ethnography, and auto-ethnography), and consider ethical and political issues in ethnographic research. We will also guide you through the process of crafting your own research project – with an opportunity to do ethnographic fieldwork – discussing questions of ethics, beneficence, positionality, research relationships, representation, knowledge production, and how to analyse and present findings in a variety of creative styles and genres. This course seeks to equip you with a strong foundation in ethnographic research skills to take into future employment or postgraduate study.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

2/3 • CRN 280 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 314 – Special Topic: Anthropology of Food and Eating

This course examines anthropological approaches to the role of food and eating in human life. It explores how food reflects social relations, expresses power structures, shapes cultural practices, and enacts systems of meaning.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 6102 • Tue 2-4pm [Kelburn]

seminar tba

ANTH 316 – Visual Anthropology

This course will consider the use of visual media in both the practice and production of ethnography by examining how visual representations are both products of cultural norms, values and actions and Considering the development of visual anthropology, this course will ask questions such as: what does seeing visual Anthropology, the analysis of scripts and picture mean? How are visual and other sensory media used to communicate? How do visual representations influence social relationships and actions? Can visual anthropology help produce a more publically accessible anthropology? This course may include visits to research institutes in Wellington.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 317 – Migration, Culture and Identity

In this course we explore migration as both empirical phenomenon and subject of anthropological study. We compare the intentions, outcomes and experiences of migrants, considering citizenship, belonging, and the nation-state, and look critically at recent models of transnationalism and diaspora which have challenged earlier ideas about migration and culture.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299 or GLBL 201

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 318 – Design Anthropology

Design anthropology is a form of applied anthropology that uses ethnographic, anthropological and design methodologies to foster positive social change. It is critical, collaborative, and interdisciplinary. This course uses the core principles and methods of design anthropology to explore the role of culture in shaping design practices. It asks what possibilities a design anthropology can open for sustainable change. The course will take a comparative approach to design, bringing cases specific to Aotearoa into dialogue with sites beyond. Topics addressed include health and wellbeing, urban design, environmental sustainability, Indigenous design theories and social justice.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299, DSDN 171, 172, SIDN 233, 272 (X) ANTH 214, ANTH 313 in 2020, 2022

1/3 • CRN 36034 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

Applied Linguistics

See also Linguistics and TESOL

TSOL 202 – Vocabulary and Grammar for TESOL

The course explores the key features and patterns of English vocabulary and grammar from the perspective of the challenges they present to learners and teachers. It examines the implications for planning teaching and assessing learning. Students will evaluate the content of courses and published teaching materials.

20 pts • (P) 40 points; (X) ALIN 301

Not offered in 2024

TSOL 203 – Text and Cultural Context

The course explores the language demands of written and spoken genres at school, as well as how the teacher can meet these demands. The course considers the language of schooling and the learning and teaching of languages across cultural contexts.

20 pts • (P) 40 points; (X) ALIN 302

Not offered in 2024

TSOL 301 – Language Teaching: Principles to Practice

This course aims to develop an applied understanding of principles for language teaching and learning. It explores materials selection and design, and procedures and techniques for teaching language lessons, focusing on teaching the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Course members will participate in peer teaching and peer observation.

20 pts • (P) LING 201 (or LALS201) and TSOL 202 or 203; 20 pts in language other than English or an equivalent second language learning experience; (X) ALIN 201

Not offered in 2024

TSOL 302 – Critical Perspectives on the Second Language Curriculum

This course explores the ways in which a second language curriculum is designed and developed to provide relevant learning goals, effective learning opportunities in different contexts, and assessment of how well the opportunities have been taken up and the goals have been achieved. It also examines the social and cultural impact of language education policy, and the role of English in the world today.

20 pts • (P) LING 101 or 111; 60 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule or from the BTeach Schedule (X) ALIN 202

Not offered in 2024

Applied Physics

PHYS 242 – Electromagnetism I

PHYS 242 will provide a comprehensive foundation in electromagnetic theory using vector calculus, from the laws of electrostatics and magnetostatics to the time-varying Maxwell equations. The course will also introduce applications of these concepts to electrical circuits, as well as electromagnetic waves, interference and diffraction.

15 pts • (P) (MATH 142, 151) or B+ or better in ENGR 122; (PHYS 142, 145) or (PHYS 114, 115) or (ENGR 141, 142) (X) PHYS 222; either of PHYS 260, 261 as determined by the Head of School

2/3 • CRN 33241 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

PHYS 243 – Classical Mechanics and Relativity

An introduction to classical mechanics and relativity at an intermediate level, including Lagrangian mechanics, Hamiltonian mechanics, special relativity and a conceptual introduction to general relativity.

15 pts • (P) (MATH 142, 151) or B+ or better in ENGR 122; one of (PHYS 101, 114, 142, ENGR 141) (X) PHYS 221, 223; either of PHYS 260, 261 as determined by the Head of School

1/3 • CRN 33242 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

PHYS 245 – Methods of Experimental Physics

PHYS 245 will focus on skills required for experimental physics in laboratory environments. This will include planning of experimental designs and the processing, interpretation, documentation and presentation of experimental results. The course will also introduce basic concepts of programming and numerical physics.

15 pts • (P) (MATH 142 (or B+ or better in MATH 141), MATH 151) or B+ or better in ENGR 122; (PHYS 114, 115) or (PHYS 145) or (ENGR 141, 142); (X) PHYS 217; either of PHYS 260, 261 as determined by the Head of School

1/3 • CRN 33243 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

PHYS 260 – Topics in Physics 1

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School for students not majoring in physics.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School (X) any of PHYS 209-245 as determined by the Head of School

1/3 • CRN 33244 • tba [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 33245 • tba [Kelburn]

PHYS 261 – Topics in Physics 2

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School for students not majoring in physics.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School (X) any of PHYS 209-245 as determined by the Head of School

1/3 • CRN 33246 • tba [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 33247 • tba [Kelburn]

Architecture

SARC 111 – Introduction to Design Processes / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Mahi Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce concepts and processes used in human environments. These concepts and processes are examined in relation to the physical, social and cultural contexts in which designers operate.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18165 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 112 – Design Processes / Ngā Tukanga

Studio-based projects explore how abstract concepts of formal and spatial composition can be used to create habitable places. Discipline-specific modules introduce concepts and processes which are particular to architecture, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18166 • [Te Aro]

SARC 121 – Introduction to Built Environment Technology / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Whare Hangahanga

An introduction to fundamental structural and constructional principles for designed environments, with particular emphasis on establishing an understanding of the mutual dependencies between design intentions, structural performance and construction materials and systems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18167 • Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

SARC 122 – Introduction to Environmental Design Sciences/ He Timatanga Kōrero mō te Taiao Hoahoa

An introduction to the fundamental principles of environmentally-sensitive design, with respect to both interior and exterior designed environments (and their interactions).

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18168 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 131 – Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Whakaora i Te Taiao Hangahanga

The definitions and macro contexts of sustainability, emphasising the roles, responsibilities and opportunities for professionals in the designed and built environment. The course covers climate and microclimate, resources, materials production, environmental impact and social equity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18169 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 151 – Introduction to Design History and Theory / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho i te ao Whakarākei

Introduction to the major historical and theoretical influences shaping the contemporary built environment.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18170 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 161 – Introduction to Design Communication / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi Ngātahi i Te Ao Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce principles, media and techniques used in the representation of three-dimensional design concepts. The studio component emphasises conventions for describing formal and spatial subjects in scaled drawings, physical models, digital models and text.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18171 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 162 – Design Communication / Te Whakarākei me te Mahi Ngātahi

Studio-based projects explore principles, media and techniques used in the representation of two and three-dimensional design concepts. Students are introduced to the communication conventions of architecture, building science, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18172 • [Te Aro]

ARCI 211 – Architecture Design I / Te Whakarākei Whare I

Studio-based design projects introduce the issues, concepts, vocabularies and strategies of architectural design. Exploration and representation of architectural ideas in a range of media.

15 pts • (P) BAS Part 1

1/3 • CRN 18525 • ^ Mon 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ARCI 212 – Architecture Design Integration I / Te Whakakotahitanga o ngā Tikanga Whakarākei Whare I

Studio-based projects explore people-environment relationships, integrating knowledge gained in the Human Environmental Science course. Architecture is examined as a means for modifying human environments in ways that affect comfort, efficiency, mood and meaning.

30 pts • (P) ARCI 211, SARC 223; (X) SARC 216

2/3 • CRN 18526 • Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 222 – Structural Systems for Architecture /  Te Whakamahinga o nga Rauemi mo Hoahoanga

Introduction to the basic structural principles and material properties that underpin the fabric of constructed environments. The course presents the basic requirements for structural systems; structural form and proportion; properties of construction materials; performance under load; and responds to aspects of sustainability; structural design principles and strategies; examples of architecture and engineering collaboration.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 122 (X) BILD 222

2/3 • CRN 33201 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 251 – History and Theory of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho

Introduction to the development of architectural theory and its application to the recent history of built form.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

1/3 • CRN 18527 • Tue 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 251 – History of Building Technology / Ngā Whanaketanga a te Ao Hangahanga

The historical, social and economic development of construction methods, materials and systems. The impact, relevance and importance of the scientific, industrial and information technology revolutions. Trends in the international development of building technology, with a primary focus on New Zealand.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121 or 151

2/3 • CRN 18480 • Mon, Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 262 – Building Project Management Cost Planning / Te Whakahaere me te Whakamahere ā-utu i ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare

This course examines concepts of building cost planning and its theory and application in New Zealand. An overview of the principles of estimation, the standard method of measurement, schedules of quantities, elemental analysis, IT cost estimation and financial analysis.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

2/3 • CRN 18482 • Tue 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 212 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Te Waihanga me Ngā Momo Hangarau

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry and their creative application in the design of furniture and furnished environments.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 111 or SARC 112

2/3 • CRN 18457 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 214 – Seeing Architecture through Photography / Te Kitenga o te Hoahoa Whare mā te Whakaahua

This course examines architectural photography as a medium of communication within architectural discourse. Emphasising formal literacy in photographic analysis and image-making, students will explore photography as both a means of 'seeing' and as a method for analysing the fundamental elements and systems that order our experience of buildings, interiors and landscapes.

15 pts • (P) 75 points; (X) SARC 281 (2021)

2/3 • CRN 34068 • Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 216 – Mātauranga Māori and the Built and Natural Environment I / Hanga taiao - he kākāno

Studio-based design projects focused on mātauranga Māori, including kaupapa, histories and Māori design strategies. This course will connect into the three design-focussed disciplines in Architecture – Landscape Architecture, Interior Architecture and Architecture - and provide students with specialist Māori knowledge and skills to augment the discipline-specific technical/skills-based learning required for the respective design discipline.

30 pts • (P) ARCI/INTA/LAND 211; (X) ARCI/INTA/LAND 212

2/3 • CRN 34106 • [Te Aro]

SARC 221 – Building Materials and Construction / Te Waihanga me ngā Momo Rauemi

Buildings are studied as assemblages of distinct yet interrelated systems. Students explore basic materials and methods of construction, gaining insight to structural and other performance outcomes. Construction is discussed as a dimension in the overall design activity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 131

1/3 • CRN 18456 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 223 – Human Environmental Science / Te Āhurutanga o te Taiao

The course covers methods of achieving building environmental conditions that relate to the requirements of building users. The course covers climatic analysis and specifications of the environmental performance of buildings, together with the thermal, visual, acoustic, and aerodynamic principles of building elements; plus the services systems required to control and maintain these conditions.

15 pts • (P) SARC 122; (X) BILD 223 in 2010-2020; SARC 281 in 2014-2017

1/3 • CRN 18395 • Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 224 – Fire Safety Design / Te Tinihanga a Mahuika

Basic principles of design to ensure the safety of people in buildings during a fire. The implications for building form, layout and interiors on escape route design, statutory requirements, and alternative solutions as means of compliance.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

Not offered in 2024

SARC 232 – Sustainability in the Built Environment / Te toitūtanga i te hanganga

The philosophical, conceptual and contextual basis of sustainable and regenerative design. Content includes material on the ecological and environmental challenges to society in the present and future; resource stewardship and the effective utilisation of materials; working with nature and natural systems; well-being enhancement; green, sustainable and regenerative design.

15 pts • (P) 60 100-level SARC pts; (X) BILD 232

2/3 • CRN 35109 • Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 233 – Environment and Behaviour / Ngā Huatanga o te Taiao

Study of the interaction between human behaviour and the design of the physical environment related to age, gender, culture and occupation. Content scopes across physiological, psychological, social and cultural aspects and activity patterns.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

Not offered in 2024

SARC 252 – Building Heritage Conservation / Te Tiaki i ngā Whare Toitū

An introduction to building conservation with emphasis on New Zealand's architectural heritage. The course introduces systems of assessment, interpretation, management, and documentation of culturally significant buildings. Attention is given to issues raised by contemporary modification of buildings and implications on historic integrity and/or authenticity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

Not offered in 2024

SARC 261 – Communication / Ngā Kaupapa Hangarau

Studio-based course introduces and develops the representation of design concepts of projects, with a focus on drawing and modelling by means of analogue and digital media. Emphasis is placed on developing effective graphic communication techniques for design and implementation.

15 pts • (P) SARC 161 and 162

2/3 • CRN 18348 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 311 – Architecture Design II / Te Whakarākei Whare II

Studio-based contemporary design issues related to the professional specialisations and research interests of academic staff. Introduction to design as a research-led activity and as a research methodology.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212 or SARC 216; (X) SARC 313

1/3 • CRN 18528 • Tue 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 312 – Architecture Design Integration Capstone / Te Whakakotahitanga o ngā Tikanga-Tūtohu o te Whakarākei Whare

Studio-based design projects explore the relationship between architectural concepts, structural systems, materials and construction techniques, integrating knowledge gained in the construction course. Design is presented as an integrated problem-solving process, which results in a creative synthesis of concept, aesthetics, function and technology.

30 pts • (P) ARCI 311 or SARC 313, ARCI 222 (C) SARC 321

2/3 • CRN 18529 • Mon, Thu 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 361 – Project Management / Ngā Kaupapa Whakahaere

The theory, practice and current technologies of project management from implementation through to delivery, including project constraints, cost planning and control, critical path, consultation, administration and quality control.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

2/3 • CRN 18486 • Tue 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 364 – Building Code Compliance / Ngā Ture Whakaruruhau

Means of compliance with the New Zealand Building Code, building on technical knowledge gained in other courses. Means of compliance are: Acceptable Solutions, Verification Methods and Certification, and Performance Based Design.

15 pts • (P) one of LAND 221 or SARC 221; (X) SARC 364, SARC 464

1/3 • CRN 18477 • Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro], Fri 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 302 – Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation / Ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare Herehere

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons. International examples will be drawn on. Particular attention will be paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) SARC 223; (X) SARC 368 in 2016, 2017, 2019; SARC 328 in 2020; SARC 468 in 2016, 2017, 2019; SARC 428 in 2020

1/3 • CRN 33126 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 311 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Mahi Whakaaturanga

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INDN/INTA/LAND 212, BILD 232 or SARC 216, 232.

Not offered in 2024

SARC 312 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Tikanga me ngā Tukanga Waihanga Taputapu Whare

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points from the BAS or BDI schedules (X) SARC 412

1/3 • CRN 18295 • Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 313 – Mātauranga Māori and the Built and Natural Environment II / Hanga taiao - he rito

Studio-based contemporary design issues focused on mātauranga Māori. Introduction to design as a research-led activity and as a research methodology. This course will connect the three disciplines of Landscape Architecture, Interior Architecture and Architecture, to provide students with the specific technical/skills-based learning required for these three disciplines.

15 pts • (P) SARC 216; (X) ARCI/INTA/LAND 311

1/3 • CRN 34107 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 315 – Critical Urbanism Aotearoa New Zealand / Tātari Kāinga Rua

This course critically explores concepts and practices which have influenced the production of space, form and meaning in Aotearoa New Zealand cities. Current urban issues and their relationship to historical and contemporary political, socio-cultural and environmental paradigms are examines alongside emerging urban practices motivated by justness.

15 pts • (P) 60 points at 200- level from the BAS or BBSc schedules or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 34108 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 320 – Topic in Digital Computation / Tātai Hangarau

.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2024

SARC 321 – Construction / Te Mahi Waihanga

Medium-scale building construction with relevant building materials, key elements, construction technologies, construction sequences and building processes.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

2/3 • CRN 18296 • Mon, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 323 – Colour, Pattern, Light / Ngā Āhuatanga o te Ata me te Pō

Study of colour, pattern and lighting concepts and technologies and their meaning, role and creative applications.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 212 or SARC 216

1/3 • CRN 18297 • Wed 2.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 328 – Topic in Current Research in Architecture / Ngā Rangahau o te Wā i te Mahi Whakarākei / Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons, including film, digital and heritage representations of prisons. International examples will be drawn on, but there will be particular attention paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2024

SARC 331 – Sustainable and Regenerative Design / Te Whakarauoratanga o ngā Mahi Whakarākei

This course explores sustainable and regenerative design principles and applications across a range of designed and built environments. Emphasis is on operation at the leading edge of theoretical and philosophical thinking in the field and to explore and employ critical thinking and innovative solutions. The Living Building Challenge will provide a key reference point for the work in the course.

15 pts • (P) SARC (or BILD) 232 (X) BILD 331;

1/3 • CRN 35108 • Wed 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 351 – Urban Design Theory and Practice / Te Mahi me ngā Kōrero o te Ao Kikokiko

Introduction to the history, theory and practice of urban design. Conceptual tools and practices for analyzing, designing and implementing change in the built environment of cities.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

1/3 • CRN 18299 • Tue 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 352 – Pacific Designed Environments / Ngā Taiao o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa

Introduction to issues relating to designed and built environments of the Pacific region. Examination of contemporary conditions within a wider spatial and historical framework. In addition to a central focus on the settlement of Aotearoa/New Zealand, course material extends to other cultures within the greater Pacific rim.

15 pts • (P) one of ARCI 251, BILD 251, INTA 251, LAND 251 or GLBL 201

2/3 • CRN 18300 • Tue 3-5pm [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 34156 • [Te Aro]

SARC 353 – History of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero o Mua o Te Mahi Whakarākei

Examines paradigm shifts in architectural thinking. Course material emphasises enduring examples of great architecture which reflect the prevailing social and cultural standards of their respective periods.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

Not offered in 2024

SARC 354 – Heritage Conservation / Ngā Mahi Tiaki i ngā Whare Whakaniko

This course introduces the why, what and how of heritage conservation. Historic and contemporary approaches to heritage conservation are discussed with recent case studies (including building visits) used as vehicles for the discussion. The purpose and role of a Conservation Plan is explored. Research methods for eliciting historical information specific to a building or interior are introduced and practised. Methods of assessing heritage significance and value and of making recommendations for conservation activity are explored.

15 pts • (P) 30 pts 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC; (X) SARC 454

1/3 • CRN 18302 • Wed 8.30-10.30 [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

SARC 362 – Introduction to Practice and Management / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi me Te Whakahaere

Management and procurement/development, examining the theories and ideas that underpin planning, organising, directing and controlling the use of resources over time. Topics include the principles of management, organisational development, basic finance, costing, development feasibility, valuation theory and quantitative analysis relevant to the construction industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

1/3 • CRN 18304 • Mon 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 363 – Digital Representation and Documentation / Te Mahi a te Ao Hangarau

Computer applications as aids to visualisation and information management.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc, BDI schedules; (X) SARC 463

3/3 • CRN 18285 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 365 – Drawing / He Tuhituhi

Studio-based course covering creative and interpretive aspects of drawing with an emphasis on developing analytical and critical interrogation through manual graphic processes and across a range of subjects, media types and applied subjects. Discussed as principles and expanded upon in application, are the conventions and standards of architectural representation common to drawing practice.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 211

1/3 • CRN 18287 • ^ Thu 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 371 – International Field Study / Te Mahi a te Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed spaces and sites with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the historical and cultural contexts they are part of and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC pts; (X) SARC 471

Not offered in 2024

SARC 384 – Special Topic: Design Thinking Business

This course examines ways that business contributes to architecture and design enterprises. It also reviews a range of ways that creative strategic design-thinking contributes to various business enterprises. The course will look at how this is applied to architecture by looking at essential business concepts, tactics for starting practices and strategies for growing an established enterprise. In business application, it examines design-based concepts around Lean, Agile, Design Thinking and Scrum. The combined learnings will provide graduates with tools to open new business opportunities inside design and architecture, plus a broader set of transferable design-thinking skills to take into other businesses.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS and BDI schedules; (X) SARC 484

3/3 • CRN 33522 • tba [Distance]

SARC 386 – Special Topic: Retail Experience Architectural Design

Investigate the future of retail design relevant to the 21st century, including research concepts underlying ethical branding, products and scripting of customer journeys. Develop a design proposal for the composition and atmosphere of retail space providing extraordinary customer experience for a brand and its products.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212 or BILD 251 or INTA 212 or LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18293 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 387 – Independent Study / Kaupapa Rangahau Motuhake

This course is a supervised programme of research and study on selected themes. Independent Study Projects are available under exceptional circumstances and must be approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 23176 • tba [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 18333 • tba [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 32233 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 388 – Psychology and Behaviour in the Built Environment / Te Mātai Hinengaro me te Whanonga i ngā Whare Hangahanga

Application of psychological theory, principles and research to the study of human interaction with the built environment across a range of settings. This course focuses on how to improve usability, health, well-being and work performance in relationship to space and place. The course covers human and environment interaction theory, systems theory, psychology and design research methods, consequences of poorly informed design decisions and environmental stressors.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc schedules or GLBL 201 (X) SARC 384, 484 (2017-2019)

1/3 • CRN 32132 • Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

Architecture History and Theory

SARC 111 – Introduction to Design Processes / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Mahi Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce concepts and processes used in human environments. These concepts and processes are examined in relation to the physical, social and cultural contexts in which designers operate.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18165 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 112 – Design Processes / Ngā Tukanga

Studio-based projects explore how abstract concepts of formal and spatial composition can be used to create habitable places. Discipline-specific modules introduce concepts and processes which are particular to architecture, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18166 • [Te Aro]

SARC 121 – Introduction to Built Environment Technology / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Whare Hangahanga

An introduction to fundamental structural and constructional principles for designed environments, with particular emphasis on establishing an understanding of the mutual dependencies between design intentions, structural performance and construction materials and systems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18167 • Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

SARC 122 – Introduction to Environmental Design Sciences/ He Timatanga Kōrero mō te Taiao Hoahoa

An introduction to the fundamental principles of environmentally-sensitive design, with respect to both interior and exterior designed environments (and their interactions).

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18168 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 131 – Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Whakaora i Te Taiao Hangahanga

The definitions and macro contexts of sustainability, emphasising the roles, responsibilities and opportunities for professionals in the designed and built environment. The course covers climate and microclimate, resources, materials production, environmental impact and social equity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18169 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 151 – Introduction to Design History and Theory / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho i te ao Whakarākei

Introduction to the major historical and theoretical influences shaping the contemporary built environment.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18170 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 161 – Introduction to Design Communication / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi Ngātahi i Te Ao Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce principles, media and techniques used in the representation of three-dimensional design concepts. The studio component emphasises conventions for describing formal and spatial subjects in scaled drawings, physical models, digital models and text.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18171 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 162 – Design Communication / Te Whakarākei me te Mahi Ngātahi

Studio-based projects explore principles, media and techniques used in the representation of two and three-dimensional design concepts. Students are introduced to the communication conventions of architecture, building science, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18172 • [Te Aro]

ARCI 211 – Architecture Design I / Te Whakarākei Whare I

Studio-based design projects introduce the issues, concepts, vocabularies and strategies of architectural design. Exploration and representation of architectural ideas in a range of media.

15 pts • (P) BAS Part 1

1/3 • CRN 18525 • ^ Mon 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ARCI 212 – Architecture Design Integration I / Te Whakakotahitanga o ngā Tikanga Whakarākei Whare I

Studio-based projects explore people-environment relationships, integrating knowledge gained in the Human Environmental Science course. Architecture is examined as a means for modifying human environments in ways that affect comfort, efficiency, mood and meaning.

30 pts • (P) ARCI 211, SARC 223; (X) SARC 216

2/3 • CRN 18526 • Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 222 – Structural Systems for Architecture /  Te Whakamahinga o nga Rauemi mo Hoahoanga

Introduction to the basic structural principles and material properties that underpin the fabric of constructed environments. The course presents the basic requirements for structural systems; structural form and proportion; properties of construction materials; performance under load; and responds to aspects of sustainability; structural design principles and strategies; examples of architecture and engineering collaboration.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 122 (X) BILD 222

2/3 • CRN 33201 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 251 – History and Theory of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho

Introduction to the development of architectural theory and its application to the recent history of built form.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

1/3 • CRN 18527 • Tue 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 251 – History of Building Technology / Ngā Whanaketanga a te Ao Hangahanga

The historical, social and economic development of construction methods, materials and systems. The impact, relevance and importance of the scientific, industrial and information technology revolutions. Trends in the international development of building technology, with a primary focus on New Zealand.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121 or 151

2/3 • CRN 18480 • Mon, Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 212 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Te Waihanga me Ngā Momo Hangarau

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry and their creative application in the design of furniture and furnished environments.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 111 or SARC 112

2/3 • CRN 18457 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 214 – Seeing Architecture through Photography / Te Kitenga o te Hoahoa Whare mā te Whakaahua

This course examines architectural photography as a medium of communication within architectural discourse. Emphasising formal literacy in photographic analysis and image-making, students will explore photography as both a means of 'seeing' and as a method for analysing the fundamental elements and systems that order our experience of buildings, interiors and landscapes.

15 pts • (P) 75 points; (X) SARC 281 (2021)

2/3 • CRN 34068 • Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 216 – Mātauranga Māori and the Built and Natural Environment I / Hanga taiao - he kākāno

Studio-based design projects focused on mātauranga Māori, including kaupapa, histories and Māori design strategies. This course will connect into the three design-focussed disciplines in Architecture – Landscape Architecture, Interior Architecture and Architecture - and provide students with specialist Māori knowledge and skills to augment the discipline-specific technical/skills-based learning required for the respective design discipline.

30 pts • (P) ARCI/INTA/LAND 211; (X) ARCI/INTA/LAND 212

2/3 • CRN 34106 • [Te Aro]

SARC 221 – Building Materials and Construction / Te Waihanga me ngā Momo Rauemi

Buildings are studied as assemblages of distinct yet interrelated systems. Students explore basic materials and methods of construction, gaining insight to structural and other performance outcomes. Construction is discussed as a dimension in the overall design activity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 131

1/3 • CRN 18456 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 223 – Human Environmental Science / Te Āhurutanga o te Taiao

The course covers methods of achieving building environmental conditions that relate to the requirements of building users. The course covers climatic analysis and specifications of the environmental performance of buildings, together with the thermal, visual, acoustic, and aerodynamic principles of building elements; plus the services systems required to control and maintain these conditions.

15 pts • (P) SARC 122; (X) BILD 223 in 2010-2020; SARC 281 in 2014-2017

1/3 • CRN 18395 • Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 224 – Fire Safety Design / Te Tinihanga a Mahuika

Basic principles of design to ensure the safety of people in buildings during a fire. The implications for building form, layout and interiors on escape route design, statutory requirements, and alternative solutions as means of compliance.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

Not offered in 2024

SARC 232 – Sustainability in the Built Environment / Te toitūtanga i te hanganga

The philosophical, conceptual and contextual basis of sustainable and regenerative design. Content includes material on the ecological and environmental challenges to society in the present and future; resource stewardship and the effective utilisation of materials; working with nature and natural systems; well-being enhancement; green, sustainable and regenerative design.

15 pts • (P) 60 100-level SARC pts; (X) BILD 232

2/3 • CRN 35109 • Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 233 – Environment and Behaviour / Ngā Huatanga o te Taiao

Study of the interaction between human behaviour and the design of the physical environment related to age, gender, culture and occupation. Content scopes across physiological, psychological, social and cultural aspects and activity patterns.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

Not offered in 2024

SARC 252 – Building Heritage Conservation / Te Tiaki i ngā Whare Toitū

An introduction to building conservation with emphasis on New Zealand's architectural heritage. The course introduces systems of assessment, interpretation, management, and documentation of culturally significant buildings. Attention is given to issues raised by contemporary modification of buildings and implications on historic integrity and/or authenticity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

Not offered in 2024

SARC 261 – Communication / Ngā Kaupapa Hangarau

Studio-based course introduces and develops the representation of design concepts of projects, with a focus on drawing and modelling by means of analogue and digital media. Emphasis is placed on developing effective graphic communication techniques for design and implementation.

15 pts • (P) SARC 161 and 162

2/3 • CRN 18348 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 311 – Architecture Design II / Te Whakarākei Whare II

Studio-based contemporary design issues related to the professional specialisations and research interests of academic staff. Introduction to design as a research-led activity and as a research methodology.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212 or SARC 216; (X) SARC 313

1/3 • CRN 18528 • Tue 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

ARCI 312 – Architecture Design Integration Capstone / Te Whakakotahitanga o ngā Tikanga-Tūtohu o te Whakarākei Whare

Studio-based design projects explore the relationship between architectural concepts, structural systems, materials and construction techniques, integrating knowledge gained in the construction course. Design is presented as an integrated problem-solving process, which results in a creative synthesis of concept, aesthetics, function and technology.

30 pts • (P) ARCI 311 or SARC 313, ARCI 222 (C) SARC 321

2/3 • CRN 18529 • Mon, Thu 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 302 – Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation / Ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare Herehere

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons. International examples will be drawn on. Particular attention will be paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) SARC 223; (X) SARC 368 in 2016, 2017, 2019; SARC 328 in 2020; SARC 468 in 2016, 2017, 2019; SARC 428 in 2020

1/3 • CRN 33126 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 311 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Mahi Whakaaturanga

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INDN/INTA/LAND 212, BILD 232 or SARC 216, 232.

Not offered in 2024

SARC 312 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Tikanga me ngā Tukanga Waihanga Taputapu Whare

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points from the BAS or BDI schedules (X) SARC 412

1/3 • CRN 18295 • Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 313 – Mātauranga Māori and the Built and Natural Environment II / Hanga taiao - he rito

Studio-based contemporary design issues focused on mātauranga Māori. Introduction to design as a research-led activity and as a research methodology. This course will connect the three disciplines of Landscape Architecture, Interior Architecture and Architecture, to provide students with the specific technical/skills-based learning required for these three disciplines.

15 pts • (P) SARC 216; (X) ARCI/INTA/LAND 311

1/3 • CRN 34107 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 315 – Critical Urbanism Aotearoa New Zealand / Tātari Kāinga Rua

This course critically explores concepts and practices which have influenced the production of space, form and meaning in Aotearoa New Zealand cities. Current urban issues and their relationship to historical and contemporary political, socio-cultural and environmental paradigms are examines alongside emerging urban practices motivated by justness.

15 pts • (P) 60 points at 200- level from the BAS or BBSc schedules or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 34108 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 320 – Topic in Digital Computation / Tātai Hangarau

.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2024

SARC 321 – Construction / Te Mahi Waihanga

Medium-scale building construction with relevant building materials, key elements, construction technologies, construction sequences and building processes.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

2/3 • CRN 18296 • Mon, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 323 – Colour, Pattern, Light / Ngā Āhuatanga o te Ata me te Pō

Study of colour, pattern and lighting concepts and technologies and their meaning, role and creative applications.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 212 or SARC 216

1/3 • CRN 18297 • Wed 2.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 328 – Topic in Current Research in Architecture / Ngā Rangahau o te Wā i te Mahi Whakarākei / Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons, including film, digital and heritage representations of prisons. International examples will be drawn on, but there will be particular attention paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2024

SARC 331 – Sustainable and Regenerative Design / Te Whakarauoratanga o ngā Mahi Whakarākei

This course explores sustainable and regenerative design principles and applications across a range of designed and built environments. Emphasis is on operation at the leading edge of theoretical and philosophical thinking in the field and to explore and employ critical thinking and innovative solutions. The Living Building Challenge will provide a key reference point for the work in the course.

15 pts • (P) SARC (or BILD) 232 (X) BILD 331;

1/3 • CRN 35108 • Wed 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 351 – Urban Design Theory and Practice / Te Mahi me ngā Kōrero o te Ao Kikokiko

Introduction to the history, theory and practice of urban design. Conceptual tools and practices for analyzing, designing and implementing change in the built environment of cities.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

1/3 • CRN 18299 • Tue 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 352 – Pacific Designed Environments / Ngā Taiao o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa

Introduction to issues relating to designed and built environments of the Pacific region. Examination of contemporary conditions within a wider spatial and historical framework. In addition to a central focus on the settlement of Aotearoa/New Zealand, course material extends to other cultures within the greater Pacific rim.

15 pts • (P) one of ARCI 251, BILD 251, INTA 251, LAND 251 or GLBL 201

2/3 • CRN 18300 • Tue 3-5pm [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 34156 • [Te Aro]

SARC 353 – History of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero o Mua o Te Mahi Whakarākei

Examines paradigm shifts in architectural thinking. Course material emphasises enduring examples of great architecture which reflect the prevailing social and cultural standards of their respective periods.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

Not offered in 2024

SARC 354 – Heritage Conservation / Ngā Mahi Tiaki i ngā Whare Whakaniko

This course introduces the why, what and how of heritage conservation. Historic and contemporary approaches to heritage conservation are discussed with recent case studies (including building visits) used as vehicles for the discussion. The purpose and role of a Conservation Plan is explored. Research methods for eliciting historical information specific to a building or interior are introduced and practised. Methods of assessing heritage significance and value and of making recommendations for conservation activity are explored.

15 pts • (P) 30 pts 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC; (X) SARC 454

1/3 • CRN 18302 • Wed 8.30-10.30 [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

SARC 362 – Introduction to Practice and Management / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi me Te Whakahaere

Management and procurement/development, examining the theories and ideas that underpin planning, organising, directing and controlling the use of resources over time. Topics include the principles of management, organisational development, basic finance, costing, development feasibility, valuation theory and quantitative analysis relevant to the construction industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

1/3 • CRN 18304 • Mon 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 363 – Digital Representation and Documentation / Te Mahi a te Ao Hangarau

Computer applications as aids to visualisation and information management.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc, BDI schedules; (X) SARC 463

3/3 • CRN 18285 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 365 – Drawing / He Tuhituhi

Studio-based course covering creative and interpretive aspects of drawing with an emphasis on developing analytical and critical interrogation through manual graphic processes and across a range of subjects, media types and applied subjects. Discussed as principles and expanded upon in application, are the conventions and standards of architectural representation common to drawing practice.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 211

1/3 • CRN 18287 • ^ Thu 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 371 – International Field Study / Te Mahi a te Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed spaces and sites with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the historical and cultural contexts they are part of and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC pts; (X) SARC 471

Not offered in 2024

SARC 384 – Special Topic: Design Thinking Business

This course examines ways that business contributes to architecture and design enterprises. It also reviews a range of ways that creative strategic design-thinking contributes to various business enterprises. The course will look at how this is applied to architecture by looking at essential business concepts, tactics for starting practices and strategies for growing an established enterprise. In business application, it examines design-based concepts around Lean, Agile, Design Thinking and Scrum. The combined learnings will provide graduates with tools to open new business opportunities inside design and architecture, plus a broader set of transferable design-thinking skills to take into other businesses.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS and BDI schedules; (X) SARC 484

3/3 • CRN 33522 • tba [Distance]

SARC 386 – Special Topic: Retail Experience Architectural Design

Investigate the future of retail design relevant to the 21st century, including research concepts underlying ethical branding, products and scripting of customer journeys. Develop a design proposal for the composition and atmosphere of retail space providing extraordinary customer experience for a brand and its products.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212 or BILD 251 or INTA 212 or LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18293 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 387 – Independent Study / Kaupapa Rangahau Motuhake

This course is a supervised programme of research and study on selected themes. Independent Study Projects are available under exceptional circumstances and must be approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 23176 • tba [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 18333 • tba [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 32233 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 388 – Psychology and Behaviour in the Built Environment / Te Mātai Hinengaro me te Whanonga i ngā Whare Hangahanga

Application of psychological theory, principles and research to the study of human interaction with the built environment across a range of settings. This course focuses on how to improve usability, health, well-being and work performance in relationship to space and place. The course covers human and environment interaction theory, systems theory, psychology and design research methods, consequences of poorly informed design decisions and environmental stressors.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc schedules or GLBL 201 (X) SARC 384, 484 (2017-2019)

1/3 • CRN 32132 • Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

Art History

ARTH 101 – Art, Creativity and Identity

What does art do? How do humans use art to express our diverse social, cultural, collective and individual identities? Through a series of case studies, this course examines the way visual art and culture is used to express identity and its relation to changing notions of creativity and selfhood. The goal of the course is to think critically about the purpose of art: what is it, what does it do, who is it for, how is it made?

20 pts • (X) ARTH 103

1/3 • CRN 33118 • Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 102 – Art, Revolution and Crisis

How has art changed the world? This course introduces students to the ways art has responded to political, cultural, social, environmental and technological revolutions over the past 250 years. We examine how art anticipates and interrogates the definition of revolution itself. Students will develop critical and descriptive skills to analyse the role of art in revolution, activism, social movements and political transformation.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 33119 • Mon, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 103 – Art, Creativity and Identity

What does art do? How do humans use art to express our diverse social, cultural, collective and individual identities? Through a series of case studies, this course examines the way visual art and culture is used to express identity and its relation to changing notions of creativity and selfhood. The goal of the course is to think critically about the purpose of art: what is it, what does it do, who is it for, how is it made? This course is specifically targeted at BDI students, BA students should enrol in ARTH 101 instead.

15 pts • (X) ARTH 101

1/3 • CRN 33120 • Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 201 – Art and Environment

This course explores the relationship between art and the environment, with a focus on art since 1968. Alongside changing definitions of 'nature' and what it means to be human, the course considers the role of art in environmental activism. Students will reflect on the way the environment is experienced and imagined within art historical and interdisciplinary debates.

20 pts • (P) 15 ARTH or 20 GLBL points (X) ARTH 226 in 2020-2021

Not offered in 2024

ARTH 202 – The Long Century: European Art 1789-1900

This course examines the relationship between art, politics and power in Europe from the French Revolution to the end of the nineteenth century. Topics include: the art of revolution and reaction, romanticism and subjectivity, the crisis of the European classical tradition, landscape and industrialisation, socialism and the avant-garde, and modernity and the representation of modern life.

20 pts • (P) 15 ARTH pts (X) ARTH 222;

1/3 • CRN 34066 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

ARTH 203 – Object Lessons: Art and Visual Culture

We live in a visual world constructed from material objects. Some of these objects are imbued with spiritual and cultural energies, others are ignored for their mundane presence in our everyday lives. This course introduces students to the study of visual cultures, and the speculative role of art history in an encounter with objects in the world including flowers made from glass, microbes and fungi, drains, dragons and digital humans.

20 pts • (P) 15 ARTH points

Not offered in 2024

ARTH 204 – Art, Vision and Encounter

This course examines the role of art and vision in the formation of two globalising maritime civilisations, European and Oceanic, and in the encounters between them from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth century. The course considers ways in which space, time and self were visualised in different cultural contexts and the role of art in mediating cross-cultural encounters.

20 pts • (P) 15 ARTH points (or PASI 101); (X) ARTH 214

Not offered in 2024

ARTH 205 – Questioning Modernity

This course explores how artists responded to the experience of modernity from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. It examines individual and collective efforts to develop new visual vocabularies to make sense of a world of contingency and flux where incessant change threatens to dissolve the authority of past tradition.

20 pts • (P) 15 ARTH or 20 GLBL points; (X) ARTH 219

2/3 • CRN 34070 • Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 206 – Art in Aotearoa New Zealand

This course introduces the major artists, art forms and issues to have shaped the history of art in Aotearoa New Zealand. In particular, the course focuses on the effects of Māori-Pākehā interrelations, and the role of landscape and identity as key subjects in the history of New Zealand art. We consider Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the ever-evolving cultural and institutional frameworks and theoretical contexts for art in Aotearoa.

20 pts • (P) 15 ARTH points; (X) ARTH 213

Not offered in 2024

ARTH 208 – Topics In Aotearoa New Zealand Art

This course introduces students to a topic in art in Aotearoa New Zealand, developed and delivered by the Oroya and Melvin Day Fellow in New Zealand Art History. Co-taught with ARTH 308

20 pts • (P) 40 100-level points (X) ARTH 308;

3/3 • CRN 36052 • Wed, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

ARTH 301 – Cultures of Surrealism

This course looks at the work of artists, writers and critics associated with surrealism and its legacies. It will analyse the cultures of surrealism, exploring their relation to previous artistic and cultural movements, polemics within the surrealist movement, and their legacies on contemporary practice.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ARTH 200-299 (X) ARTH 334 in 2021

1/3 • CRN 35005 • Mon 10-12 [Kelburn]

ARTH 302 – Art and the Cold War

This course focuses on the visual arts from the post-WWII period to the end of the 1970s. It looks at the fate of modernism and avant-garde art in an era characterised by the ideological conflict between the capitalist West and communist East, decolonialisation and the emergence of the Third World, and increasing mobility and technological change.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ARTH 200-299 (X) ARTH 335 in 2020

2/3 • CRN 35006 • Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 303 – Monuments and Memory

From Hagia Sophia, and Spiral Jetty, to the Matakana War Memorial, this course traces the role of art in collective memory. We consider the shifting practices of public art, the desires of the powerful to memorialise themselves through public sculpture, the role of art in remembering collective trauma, the counter-monument; and, how calls to decolonise are challenging European and settler colonial notions of the monument.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ARTH 200-299 or GLBL 201

Not offered in 2024

ARTH 304 – The Planetary Turn: Art and Science

This course introduces the living planet as a site to reimagine the meeting points of art and science. With a particular focus on global intersections of art, science, technology, and environment since the seventeenth century, the course examines non-Western and Indigenous as well as European, cultural, political and aesthetic perspectives on the complex challenges facing our planet.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ARTH 200-299 or GLBL 201

1/3 • CRN 34078 • Fri 2-5pm [Kelburn]

ARTH 305 – Island Identities Oceanic Imaginaries

This course examines the field of contemporary Pacific art in Aotearoa New Zealand and the wider Pacific. Focusing on the tension between 'Island Identities' and 'Oceanic Imaginaries' – between roots and routes – the course examines the significance of place, ethnicity, history and culture as well as alliances, exchanges, migration and mobility in the politics of identity formation, community building and decolonisation in the Pacific.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ARTH 200-299 (X) ARTH 336

Not offered in 2024

ARTH 306 – Indigenous Modernisms: Genealogies of the Contemporary

Today, Indigenous artists across the world bring a challenging array of aesthetic, cultural, and political perspectives to the discourse of contemporary art. This course examines the ‘genealogies’ of these practices in the indigenisation of European modernism and the crafting of modern identities in response to the incursions of colonial modernity.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ARTH 200-299

2/3 • CRN 34079 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

ARTH 308 – Topics In Aotearoa New Zealand Art

This course introduces students to a topic in art in Aotearoa New Zealand, developed and delivered by the Oroya and Melvin Day Fellow in New Zealand Art History.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points (X) ARTH 208;

3/3 • CRN 36053 • Wed, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

Artificial Intelligence

AIML 131 – Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Enter the dynamic world of Artificial Intelligence with AIML 131. Delve deep into Large Language Models, such as ChatGPT, addressing challenges like bias and hallucinations. Witness the power of text-to-image generation through tools like Midjourney. Grasp the foundational principles of Machine Learning and get acquainted with Explainable AI. Discover how AI is making waves in Aotearoa, touching on ethics and real-world applications. No programming experience? No worries! AIML 131 is designed for everyone. You will gain a good understanding of AI principles and its transformative impact so that you can use AI to improve lives, whatever your area of work.

15 pts • (X) COMP 307, COMP 309

2/3 • CRN 35047 • Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

AIML 231 – Techniques in Machine Learning

This course introduces core concepts and techniques in machine learning, as well as commonly used software libraries for implementing machine learning pipelines. It includes an overview of the machine learning field, including supervised and unsupervised learning; fundamental machine learning techniques including neural networks; tools to understand data such as exploratory data analysis, pre-processing, and visualisation; and the design machine learning pipelines. This course balances theoretical concepts of machine learning and the use of programming libraries for hands-on practice.

15 pts • (P) AIML 131 or 60 200-level points or at least a B in DATA 101; one of (COMP 103, 132) (X) COMP 307, 309, DATA 302

1/3 • CRN 35049 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

AIML 232 – Techniques in Artificial Intelligence

This course introduces various concepts and techniques of broad applicability to artificial intelligence and machine learning. It includes an introduction to common machine learning paradigms such as neural networks and evolutionary learning; gradient-based and gradient-free optimisation techniques; dimensionality reduction; reasoning under uncertainty including Bayesian networks; and an introduction to AI planning. The course covers how these concepts can be used to solve important AI/ML tasks such as classification, regression, clustering and sequential decision making.

15 pts • (P) AIML 231, COMP 103, one of (ENGR 123, MATH 177, STAT 193, QUAN 102, EEEN 220) (X) COMP 307

2/3 • CRN 35050 • Wed, Thu, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

DATA 302 – Machine Learning Techniques for Data Science

This course introduces a range of machine learning techniques of importance in Data Science, and gives students experience in using modern software libraries for implementing machine learning pipelines. Topics will include machine learning techniques for both supervised and unsupervised learning, including neural networks, and the design of machine learning pipelines.

15 pts • (P) DATA 201, DATA 202 (X) AIML 231, COMP 309

1/3 • CRN 36069 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

Asian Studies

ASIA 101 – Aotearoa New Zealand and Asia

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of aspects of Asia, via a focus on the relationship between Asia and New Zealand. Topics include historical contacts, economic and political relations, cultural globalisation, and immigrant communities.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 8006 • Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ASIA 111 – Introduction to Asian Histories and Cultures

Asia is significant to New Zealand’s future. But how much do you know about this incredibly vast, dynamic and diverse region? In this course we will discuss key societal aspects of Northeast, Southeast and South Asia. You will learn about the basic characteristics of the cultures including geographical locations, peoples, religions, histories and traditions. This course will allow you to understand the challenges and opportunities that lie in the region and will prepare you to continue study in many areas with an international focus, such as International Relations, International Business, Languages, Security Studies, or Global Studies. This course will suit all students who are interested in an internationally focussed degree and future career.

20 pts

3/3 • CRN 30037 • [Kelburn]

FHSS 110 – Exploring the World through Languages and Cultures

How do languages and cultures interrelate, and how can we read them in the world around us? This course provides students with insights into how languages and cultures shape and reflect identity by critically engaging with a wide variety of global texts and objects located in New Zealand’s capital city and beyond. Texts are studied in English translation.

20 pts

3/3 • CRN 33030 • [Distance]

ASIA 201 – Contemporary Asian Society

An in-depth look at contemporary Asian societies with particular attention to economic, political and social change within the region and how these changes have been manifested in cultural productions.

20 pts • (P) (ASIA 101 or 111) or GLBL101 or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 6627 • Tue, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ASIA 203 – Modern Korean Society

This course offers a study of contemporary Korean society and popular culture and draws on primary sources from literature, film and music. Co-taught with ASIA 304.

20 pts • (P) (ASIA 101 or 111) or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ASIA 304

Not offered in 2024

ASIA 204 – Special Topic: East Asia: Tradition and Transformation

Are you interested in learning about how East Asia’s history and culture has become vital in Aotearoa New Zealand? In this course we will explore the rich traditions of China and Japan and other communities in the region such as Korea and the Ryūkyū Islands and the impact that they have had upon the world. The region has undergone dynamic changes over centuries, and we will also study the significant transformations that have occurred in such areas as the family, religion, language, gender roles, intercultural relations, politics and the economy.

20 pts • (P) 40 points from ICOM, GLBL or the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 8008 • Thu 12-2pm [Kelburn]

ASIA 208 – East Asian Society and Culture through Film

This course examines East Asian cinema from the early twentieth century to the present. Selected East Asian films are studied in their historical, political and cultural context with special emphasis on issues related to nationhood, modernity, gender roles and globalisation. This course is to be taught in English and has a film viewing component.

20 pts • (P) 40 points, including at least 20 points from (ASIA, CHIN, JAPA, FILM)

Not offered in 2024

FHSS 210 – Language Study Abroad

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 100-level points at Victoria. The course is available both to students who have studied the language before and to students with no previous knowledge of the language. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 100-level and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 28218 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ASIA 301 – Nation and Nationalism in Asia

What is a nation? What is nationalism? This course provides an interdisciplinary context within which students explore these important questions as they relate to Asian Studies.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from Part A of the the BA Schedule, including at least 20 points from (ASIA, HIST, INTP) or GLBL 201

1/3 • CRN 6628 • Wed 12-2pm [Kelburn]

ASIA 302 – Selected Topic: Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of research and study on selected themes in Asian Studies.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from the BA Schedule, a B average or better at 200-level and permission of the Course Coordinator

1/3 • CRN 8318 • ^ [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 11053 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ASIA 304 – Modern Korean Society

This course offers a study of contemporary Korean society and popular culture and draws on primary sources from literature, film and music. Co-taught with ASIA 203. Trimester 3: Withdrawal with refund by 12/01/2018; withdrawal without refund by 07/02/2018, after which date the permission of the Associate Dean (Students) will be required to withdraw.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ASIA 203

Not offered in 2024

FHSS 310 – Study Abroad for Language Students

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 points of relevant language acquisition courses at Victoria. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points of language study at 200-level or higher and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 25151 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Biological Sciences

See also Cell and Molecular Bioscience, Conservation Biology, Ecological Restoration, Ecology and Biodiversity, Marine Biology and Microbiology

BIOL 111 – Cell and Molecular Biology

This course will explore the molecular basis of life, providing students with a strong foundation in cell biology. Key concepts will include the structure and function of major cell types, biological chemistry and metabolism, and cell division and development. We’ll explore these concepts using a variety of examples from across the tree of life, including plants, animals and microbes.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 566 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BIOL 113 – Biology of Plants

An exploration into the structure, function and biodiversity of plants and fungi, emphasising their adaptations to different environments, their interactions with other organisms and their fundamental importance to humanity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 7037 • Mon, Tue, Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 114 – Biology of Animals

An introduction to animal structure and function. This course is largely based on the biology of mammals with a strong emphasis on human biology but comparison is made throughout with other animals.

15 pts • (X) BMSC 114

1/3 • CRN 7038 • Mon 4-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 132 – Biodiversity and Conservation

An introduction to the diversity, management and conservation of microbial, plant and animal communities. Using key taxa or ecosystems as examples, students will gain an appreciation of the current issues facing the world's biodiversity, and explore possible methods for conservation, including habitat restoration, translocation, and predator control.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 568 • [Taught Online]

SCIE 105 – The Molecular Science of Life

Explore the molecular basis of human health and everyday life. You will learn about atomic and molecular structure and how this relates to the function of blood. Topics include electrolytes and osmolarity, blood group determinants, gas transport, blood pH, the molecules and chemistry of blood tests, and metabolic imbalances that lead to diseases that are commonly screened for using blood. This course is designed to support students from a range of backgrounds, including the health sciences. No previous chemistry experience needed. This course can be taken fully online, although in-person workshop sessions will be provided to assist with student learning.

15 pts • (X) SCIE 103 in 2022

1/3 • CRN 35091 • [Distance]

BIOL 219 – New Zealand Flora and Fauna

A field course that explores the unique flora and fauna of Aotearoa, New Zealand. This course covers the basic principles of species interactions and how they can shape the ecology and evolution of native trees. Reading material covers how New Zealand's flora and fauna parallels that on other isolated islands. Daily field trips will reinforce the concepts learned in lectures and gives hands-on experience with native plants and animals.

15 pts • (P) 60 points

part year/3 • CRN 26243 • [Kelburn]

BIOL 222 – Ecology and Environment

An introduction to the principles of Ecology and Environmental Science, including a required week long field trip in the mid-trimester break. The course will focus on physical and biological processes in terrestrial environments and ecosystem functioning. The field trip will introduce techniques relevant to field-based enquiry in ecological and environmental science. Also taught as GEOG 222.

20 pts • (P) STAT 193; 30 points from (BIOL 111, 113, 114, 132, ENVI/GEOG 114, ESCI/GEOG 111, ESCI 112); (X) GEOG 222

1/3 • CRN 15180 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 227 – Plants and Algae: Function and Diversity

Plant and algal physiology and structure with emphasis on adaptations of the whole organism; diversity and evolution of photosynthetic organisms (including blue-green bacteria, algae, and plants) and fungi.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111 or 219; BIOL 113

2/3 • CRN 9214 • Mon, Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

BIOL 228 – Animal Diversity

Diversity, form, and function of animals; an overview of the taxonomic diversity of all animals; focused study of selected terrestrial and aquatic taxa, including sponges, cnidarians, annelids, molluscs, arthropods and vertebrates.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 114

1/3 • CRN 9215 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 236 – Microbes and their Environments

Microbes may be small, but they are mighty. They make up ~15% of the biomass on Earth and are critical drivers of ecological processes. This course will introduce the physiological and biochemical diversity of microbes. It will also explore the important roles that microbes play in different environments (soil, water, and within hosts).

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111

2/3 • CRN 10761 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

BIOL 241 – Genetics

An introduction to the structure and behaviour of chromosomes, genes and DNA; and to the processes of heredity and the mechanisms by which genetic information is transmitted and expressed in animals (including humans), plants and micro-organisms. Introduction to population genetics and DNA technologies.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111 (X) BMSC 241

2/3 • CRN 9055 • Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

BIOL 243 – Physiology and Pathology 1

The functioning and roles of the peripheral nervous system and endocrine/neuroendocrine systems in the control of activity of the cardiovascular, respiratory, kidney and reproductive systems. The emphasis is on human physiology. For these systems, mechanisms of disease (pathological processes) will be presented alongside normal and abnormal physiology.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, 114; one of CHEM 113-121 (X) BIOL 253

2/3 • CRN 9057 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 244 – Introductory Biochemistry

An introduction to the relationship between structure and function of proteins, including catalysis and its regulation; the mechanisms and roles of metabolic processes in the interconversion of molecules in animals, plants and micro-organisms.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111; CHEM 113 or 114 or 121 (X) BIOL/BMSC 239, 240, BMSC 244

1/3 • CRN 18337 • Mon, Tue, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 252 – Cell and Developmental Biology

Have you ever wanted to become a “parent” of sea urchin embryos or transform stem cells? In this course we build on topics introduced in first year cell biology, you will explore the structure and behaviour of cells in terms of underlying molecular events, and the role of cells in the physiology and development of the whole organism. You will refine your skills in data analysis and reporting, communication, critical and creative thinking, alongside creating sea urchin embryos in your first lab!

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, 114 (X) BMSC 252

1/3 • CRN 9056 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 253 – Physiology and Pathology for Health

The functioning and roles of the peripheral nervous system and endocrine/neuroendocrine systems in the control of activity of the cardiovascular, respiratory, kidney and reproductive systems. The emphasis is on human physiology. For these systems, mechanisms of disease (pathological processes) will be presented alongside normal and abnormal physiology.

15 pts • (P) BIOL 111, 114; one of CHEM 113-121 (C) 60 MIDW points (X) BIOL 243

Not offered in 2024

BIOL 271 – Introductory Marine Ecology

An introductory course focusing on marine biology and ecology. This course introduces students to: the diversity and physiology of marine organisms; biological oceanography; the structure and function of marine ecosystems such as the deep sea, polar seas, rocky shores, mangrove forests and coral reefs and marine conservation issues.

20 pts • (P) 60 pts including BIOL 114

2/3 • CRN 9216 • Mon, Wed, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 314 – Island Ecology & Evolution - International Field Course in Biological Sciences

This course will put New Zealand's biota in a broader evolutionary context by investigating how our flora and fauna has evolved after reaching Lord Howe Island (LHI). A week long field trip to LHI will teach advanced principles of evolution, island ecology and conservation covered in preliminary lectures. This field trip typically takes place in the mid-year break. Note additional field costs of around $3,000 for the course.

15 pts • (P) BIOL/GEOG 222 and 15 200-level BIOL, ENVI or STAT pts or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

BIOL 325 – Global Change Biology: The Ecology of Our Planet Under Stress

An introduction to the ecophysiological responses of plants and animals to environmental and anthropogenic stress, with an emphasis on the effects of changes in global climate and land use. The course focuses on biological functions as they are affected by interactions with their physical, chemical and biotic environments.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level BIOL pts

1/3 • CRN 19701 • Tue, Thu 10-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 327 – Population and Community Ecology

This course will cover practical and conceptual approaches to the study of plant and animal ecology covering population dynamics, community structure and ecosystem ecology.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/GEOG 222, 15 200-level BIOL, ENVI or STAT pts

1/3 • CRN 9218 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

BIOL 328 – Behaviour and Conservation Ecology

This course will cover the behaviour and conservation ecology of animals and plants. The course will include ethology and sociobiology, and ecological, genetic and biogeographic principles relevant to biological conservation. Topics will incorporate pest control, environmental impact assessment, and conservation priority ranking. Case studies and issues of topical interest will be debated.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/GEOG 222, 15 200-level BIOL, ENVI or STAT pts

2/3 • CRN 9219 • Tue, Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 329 – Evolution

Origin and development of concepts about biological history including the establishment of modern experimental methods for understanding pattern and process in the origin of new species.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level BIOL, BMSC, BTEC pts

2/3 • CRN 9220 • Mon 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 340 – Genes and Genomes

Recombinant DNA technology, biotechnology, gene organisation, expression, chemical genetics and evolution in higher organisms, bioinformatics and comparative genomics.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241, 244 (X) BMSC 340

1/3 • CRN 9598 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 370 – Field Marine Ecology

A research-based course of sampling, analysis and independent projects, which includes several days of intensive field work and laboratories. PLEASE NOTE: There are two different streams of this course. Stream 1 will run at some point from late January to late February. Stream 2 will operate in the Easter break. See details for each steam in the course content description below.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 271, STAT 292 (X) BIOL 272, 373; SCIE 304 in 2018-2020.

block dates/3 • CRN 19801 • (L1) ^ [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 33237 • (L2) ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

BIOL 371 – Marine Ecology

Focusing on marine system quantitative ecology; teaching encourages students to think critically while investigating ecological processes and impacts upon population dynamics and community structure across various marine settings (e.g. soft shores, rocky and coral reefs). The course emphasises quantitative methods including design, statistical analysis and interpretation of field experiments and observational studies.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 271, STAT 292

1/3 • CRN 9221 • Wed 1-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-3pm [Kelburn]

BIOL 372 – Applied Marine Biology

Focusing on applied marine biology, you will be introduced to a wide range of human impacts on the marine environment. We will explore the diverse management strategies, approaches, and tools available globally to manage these impacts. Zealand.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 228, 271

2/3 • CRN 9222 • Tue, Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

BIOL 373 – Tropical Field Marine Ecology

An intensive research-based field course to the tropical island of Moorea, French Polynesia, involving underwater fieldwork, sampling, analysis and independent projects. The field component of this course runs in T1, over Easter/mid-trimester break; additional class meetings will occur throughout the term. This is an equivalent offering to BIOL370 (Field Marine Ecology), but with emphasis on coral reefs and subtidal ecology. Course entry requires strong swimming skills, specialist equipment, documents permitting international travel, and payment of a supplemental fee ($5000) to cover costs of airfares and accommodation.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 271, STAT 292 (X) BIOL 272, 370; SCIE 304 in 2018-2020

Not offered in 2024

Biomedical Science

BMSC 116 – Sex and Evolution

This course examines broad evolutionary themes in relation to mating patterns,gamete and early development. Examples will be taken from plants and a range of animals, both vertebrate and invertebrate. Human pregnancy and birth will also be examined. Tutorial workshops are an opportunity to discuss and explore selected topics in more depth. The course introduces basic aspects of human anatomy, physiology, genetics and psychology, and is thus a stepping-stone to advanced courses in these subjects.

15 pts • (X) BIOL 116

Not offered in 2024

BMSC 117 – The Biology of Disease

The nature and origin of disease. Bacteria and viruses: structure, identification and classification. Mechanisms of infection, pathogenesis, virulence, host susceptibility, immunity, epidemiology.Control strategies, new technologies. New organisms. Invertebrate and fungal parasites. Ecological and cultural aspects of disease.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 8739 • Tue, Wed, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

HLWB 103 – Human Biology for Health

This course reveals the wonders of the human body, exploring health from a biological perspective. You will learn to utilise key concepts in human biology, including anatomy and physiology, study core systems (cardiovascular, immune, nervous, respiratory, digestive, and endocrine) and discover the intricate balance between these systems crucial for human health. Investigate how the body responds to stress, injury, environment, and disease, affecting human homeostasis and deepen your understanding of your body and health at an entry-level.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30051 • Mon, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

SCIE 105 – The Molecular Science of Life

Explore the molecular basis of human health and everyday life. You will learn about atomic and molecular structure and how this relates to the function of blood. Topics include electrolytes and osmolarity, blood group determinants, gas transport, blood pH, the molecules and chemistry of blood tests, and metabolic imbalances that lead to diseases that are commonly screened for using blood. This course is designed to support students from a range of backgrounds, including the health sciences. No previous chemistry experience needed. This course can be taken fully online, although in-person workshop sessions will be provided to assist with student learning.

15 pts • (X) SCIE 103 in 2022

1/3 • CRN 35091 • [Distance]

BMSC 301 – Medical Microbiology

This course charts the development of the microbiology field up to the present day. The course features an in-depth investigation of microorganisms at the genetic and phenotypic levels and examines their role in infectious diseases. Students will acquire practical experience in the characterisation and identification of microbes using both classical and modern techniques. This course includes six 4-hour laboratory classes. Students are advised to check the laboratory class times before course enrolment.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 244 or BTEC 201

1/3 • CRN 8747 • Mon, Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 334 – Cell and Immunobiology

The cellular and molecular basis of the immune system, its organisation, reactions and controls in health and disease. Topics covered include the activation, differentiation and control of specific cell functions and immunological methods in research.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241, 252 (X) BIOL 334

2/3 • CRN 15262 • Tue, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

BMSC 335 – Physiology and Pathology 2

Cellular, organismal and integrative physiology of the human gastrointestinal tract, liver, muscle, neurophysiology, reproduction and human development. Diseases of these systems will also be described.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 243 (X) BIOL 335

1/3 • CRN 15263 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 5-6pm [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BMSC 339 – Cellular Regulation

The overall theme is a consideration of molecular processes that affect normal cell structure and function. Abnormalities, including cancer, are also described.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 244, 252; (X) BIOL 339

2/3 • CRN 15265 • Tue, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 343 – Advanced Genetics

A survey of experimental approaches in genetics, from classical screens to genome-wide analyses, examining a variety of genetic model organisms and their specific applications, cytogenetics, chromosomal abnormalities and associated genetic counselling issues in humans. Fundamentals are applied to searches for complex disease genes, and understanding genetic variation in human populations.

20 pts • (P) BIOL/BMSC 241; (X) BIOL 343, BIOL/BMSC 341, 342

1/3 • CRN 19861 • Mon, Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BMSC 354 – Pharmacology

Where do new therapeutic agents come from and how do they work? You will investigate the world of drug discovery and development from traditional medicines through to genome mining. We will explore how drugs interact with receptors and cause therapeutically beneficial change, as well as how transport and metabolism influence drug availability. Along the way, you will design and carry out experiments, and pick your own path through an in-class project. Through this course you will build your skills in critical thinking, developing intellectual autonomy, and integrating complex ideas.

20 pts • (P) 35 points from (BIOL/BMSC 243, 244, CHEM 115, 201)

2/3 • CRN 8756 • Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

Biotechnology

See also Biological Sciences

BTEC 101 – Introduction to Biotechnology

The aims of this course are to provide a solid understanding of the pure and applied science underlying the biotechnology industry, and to provide insight into the cultural and ethical values, and economic and political issues, that this science must align with. Particular focus in lectures will be given to the techniques and applications of recombinant biotechnology in microbes, plants & animals; harnessing natural resources; health-related biotechnology; reproductive biotechnology; environmental biotechnology; and regulation of biotechnology.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 11092 • Tue, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

BTEC 201 – Molecular Biotechnology

The aims of this course are to introduce the biotechnology industry, through examples of biotechnological innovation, introduction to microbial, plant and animal biotechnology, harnessing natural resources, health-related biotechnology and placing these in the context of cultural and ethical values and political issues. A key focus will be the understanding of important biotechnological processes and events at a molecular level.

20 pts • (P) BIOL 111, BTEC 101

2/3 • CRN 11093 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

BTEC 301 – Biotechnological Techniques and Processes

The aims of this course are to provide a solid understanding of the pure and applied science underlying the biotechnology industry, and to provide insight into the cultural and ethical values, and economic and political issues, that this science must align with. Particular focus in lectures will be given to the techniques and processes involved in development of therapeutics, vaccines, and diagnostics, and to stem cell and genetic technologies. A six-week laboratory component will provide hands-on experience with key techniques and concepts introduced in both BTEC 201 and BTEC 301.

20 pts • (P) BTEC 201

1/3 • CRN 11094 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

Building Science

SARC 111 – Introduction to Design Processes / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Mahi Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce concepts and processes used in human environments. These concepts and processes are examined in relation to the physical, social and cultural contexts in which designers operate.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18165 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 112 – Design Processes / Ngā Tukanga

Studio-based projects explore how abstract concepts of formal and spatial composition can be used to create habitable places. Discipline-specific modules introduce concepts and processes which are particular to architecture, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18166 • [Te Aro]

SARC 121 – Introduction to Built Environment Technology / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Whare Hangahanga

An introduction to fundamental structural and constructional principles for designed environments, with particular emphasis on establishing an understanding of the mutual dependencies between design intentions, structural performance and construction materials and systems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18167 • Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

SARC 122 – Introduction to Environmental Design Sciences/ He Timatanga Kōrero mō te Taiao Hoahoa

An introduction to the fundamental principles of environmentally-sensitive design, with respect to both interior and exterior designed environments (and their interactions).

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18168 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 131 – Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Whakaora i Te Taiao Hangahanga

The definitions and macro contexts of sustainability, emphasising the roles, responsibilities and opportunities for professionals in the designed and built environment. The course covers climate and microclimate, resources, materials production, environmental impact and social equity.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18169 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

SARC 151 – Introduction to Design History and Theory / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Ngā Kōrero Tuku Iho i te ao Whakarākei

Introduction to the major historical and theoretical influences shaping the contemporary built environment.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18170 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

SARC 161 – Introduction to Design Communication / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi Ngātahi i Te Ao Whakarākei

Studio-based projects introduce principles, media and techniques used in the representation of three-dimensional design concepts. The studio component emphasises conventions for describing formal and spatial subjects in scaled drawings, physical models, digital models and text.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 18171 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 162 – Design Communication / Te Whakarākei me te Mahi Ngātahi

Studio-based projects explore principles, media and techniques used in the representation of two and three-dimensional design concepts. Students are introduced to the communication conventions of architecture, building science, interior architecture and landscape architecture.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 18172 • [Te Aro]

BILD 222 – Structural Systems for Building Science /  Te Whakamahinga o nga Rauemi mo Hanga putaiao

Introduction to the basic structural principles and material properties that underpin the fabric of natural and constructed environments. The course presents the basic requirements for structural systems; structural form and proportion; equilibrium; strength of materials; bending and shear; combined stresses; elasticity, plasticity and ductility; elastic deformation; buckling; structural design principles; and elementary soil mechanics.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 122 (X) ARCI 222

1/3 • CRN 33200 • Mon 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro], Thu 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 231 – Environmental Design / Hoahoa Taiao

This course examines types of environmental engineering systems used in buildings and urban settings, outlining the principles underlying their design and selection, together with their planning implications. Systems to be covered include: energy supply; heating, ventilating and air conditioning; electricity distribution; lighting; water supply and drainage; waste disposal and recycling.

15 pts • (P) SARC 122

2/3 • CRN 18478 • Mon, Thu 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 251 – History of Building Technology / Ngā Whanaketanga a te Ao Hangahanga

The historical, social and economic development of construction methods, materials and systems. The impact, relevance and importance of the scientific, industrial and information technology revolutions. Trends in the international development of building technology, with a primary focus on New Zealand.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121 or 151

2/3 • CRN 18480 • Mon, Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 261 – Building Project Management Economics / Te Whakahaere i te Ōhanga o ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare

Economic problems and the tools of economic analysis, demand, supply, competition, structure, profitability and production in the New Zealand building and construction industry. The impact of Government policy, investment evaluation and lifecycle costing of buildings.

15 pts • (P) 30 pts 100-level SARC

1/3 • CRN 18481 • Wed 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 262 – Building Project Management Cost Planning / Te Whakahaere me te Whakamahere ā-utu i ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare

This course examines concepts of building cost planning and its theory and application in New Zealand. An overview of the principles of estimation, the standard method of measurement, schedules of quantities, elemental analysis, IT cost estimation and financial analysis.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

2/3 • CRN 18482 • Tue 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 212 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Te Waihanga me Ngā Momo Hangarau

Studio-based survey of concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry and their creative application in the design of furniture and furnished environments.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 111 or SARC 112

2/3 • CRN 18457 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 214 – Seeing Architecture through Photography / Te Kitenga o te Hoahoa Whare mā te Whakaahua

This course examines architectural photography as a medium of communication within architectural discourse. Emphasising formal literacy in photographic analysis and image-making, students will explore photography as both a means of 'seeing' and as a method for analysing the fundamental elements and systems that order our experience of buildings, interiors and landscapes.

15 pts • (P) 75 points; (X) SARC 281 (2021)

2/3 • CRN 34068 • Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 216 – Mātauranga Māori and the Built and Natural Environment I / Hanga taiao - he kākāno

Studio-based design projects focused on mātauranga Māori, including kaupapa, histories and Māori design strategies. This course will connect into the three design-focussed disciplines in Architecture – Landscape Architecture, Interior Architecture and Architecture - and provide students with specialist Māori knowledge and skills to augment the discipline-specific technical/skills-based learning required for the respective design discipline.

30 pts • (P) ARCI/INTA/LAND 211; (X) ARCI/INTA/LAND 212

2/3 • CRN 34106 • [Te Aro]

SARC 221 – Building Materials and Construction / Te Waihanga me ngā Momo Rauemi

Buildings are studied as assemblages of distinct yet interrelated systems. Students explore basic materials and methods of construction, gaining insight to structural and other performance outcomes. Construction is discussed as a dimension in the overall design activity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121, 131

1/3 • CRN 18456 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 223 – Human Environmental Science / Te Āhurutanga o te Taiao

The course covers methods of achieving building environmental conditions that relate to the requirements of building users. The course covers climatic analysis and specifications of the environmental performance of buildings, together with the thermal, visual, acoustic, and aerodynamic principles of building elements; plus the services systems required to control and maintain these conditions.

15 pts • (P) SARC 122; (X) BILD 223 in 2010-2020; SARC 281 in 2014-2017

1/3 • CRN 18395 • Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 224 – Fire Safety Design / Te Tinihanga a Mahuika

Basic principles of design to ensure the safety of people in buildings during a fire. The implications for building form, layout and interiors on escape route design, statutory requirements, and alternative solutions as means of compliance.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

Not offered in 2024

SARC 232 – Sustainability in the Built Environment / Te toitūtanga i te hanganga

The philosophical, conceptual and contextual basis of sustainable and regenerative design. Content includes material on the ecological and environmental challenges to society in the present and future; resource stewardship and the effective utilisation of materials; working with nature and natural systems; well-being enhancement; green, sustainable and regenerative design.

15 pts • (P) 60 100-level SARC pts; (X) BILD 232

2/3 • CRN 35109 • Tue 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 233 – Environment and Behaviour / Ngā Huatanga o te Taiao

Study of the interaction between human behaviour and the design of the physical environment related to age, gender, culture and occupation. Content scopes across physiological, psychological, social and cultural aspects and activity patterns.

15 pts • (P) SARC 121

Not offered in 2024

SARC 252 – Building Heritage Conservation / Te Tiaki i ngā Whare Toitū

An introduction to building conservation with emphasis on New Zealand's architectural heritage. The course introduces systems of assessment, interpretation, management, and documentation of culturally significant buildings. Attention is given to issues raised by contemporary modification of buildings and implications on historic integrity and/or authenticity.

15 pts • (P) SARC 151

Not offered in 2024

SARC 261 – Communication / Ngā Kaupapa Hangarau

Studio-based course introduces and develops the representation of design concepts of projects, with a focus on drawing and modelling by means of analogue and digital media. Emphasis is placed on developing effective graphic communication techniques for design and implementation.

15 pts • (P) SARC 161 and 162

2/3 • CRN 18348 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 321 – Sustainable Engineering Systems Design / Ngā Punaha Whakarauora i te Taiao

This course addresses the interaction between buildings and the environment in the achievement of comfort, performance and sustainability and the design of appropriate sustainable engineering systems at the building scale.

15 pts • (P) BILD 231, SARC (or BILD) 232

2/3 • CRN 18483 • Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

BILD 322 – Structures / Ngā Āhuatanga Whare

Qualitative analysis of indeterminate structures; introduction to earthquake resistant design of buildings; structural loads and load paths; advanced reinforced concrete, timber and structural steel design and construction concepts.

15 pts • (P) BILD 222

2/3 • CRN 18484 • Wed 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Fri 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 361 – Project Management / Ngā Kaupapa Whakahaere

The theory, practice and current technologies of project management from implementation through to delivery, including project constraints, cost planning and control, critical path, consultation, administration and quality control.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

2/3 • CRN 18486 • Tue 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 362 – Construction Law / Ngā Ture Waihanga

The New Zealand legal system relating to land, buildings and the construction industry, including the law of torts, copyright, property, contracts, professional liability and arbitration.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

1/3 • CRN 18476 • Mon 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

BILD 364 – Building Code Compliance / Ngā Ture Whakaruruhau

Means of compliance with the New Zealand Building Code, building on technical knowledge gained in other courses. Means of compliance are: Acceptable Solutions, Verification Methods and Certification, and Performance Based Design.

15 pts • (P) one of LAND 221 or SARC 221; (X) SARC 364, SARC 464

1/3 • CRN 18477 • Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro], Fri 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 302 – Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation / Ngā Mahi Waihanga Whare Herehere

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons. International examples will be drawn on. Particular attention will be paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) SARC 223; (X) SARC 368 in 2016, 2017, 2019; SARC 328 in 2020; SARC 468 in 2016, 2017, 2019; SARC 428 in 2020

1/3 • CRN 33126 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 311 – Exhibition Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Mahi Whakaaturanga

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the exhibition field. Students will undertake exhibition design projects.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INDN/INTA/LAND 212, BILD 232 or SARC 216, 232.

Not offered in 2024

SARC 312 – Furniture Design, Construction and Technologies / Ngā Tikanga me ngā Tukanga Waihanga Taputapu Whare

Studio-based studies of advanced concepts, processes and materials used in the furniture industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points from the BAS or BDI schedules (X) SARC 412

1/3 • CRN 18295 • Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 313 – Mātauranga Māori and the Built and Natural Environment II / Hanga taiao - he rito

Studio-based contemporary design issues focused on mātauranga Māori. Introduction to design as a research-led activity and as a research methodology. This course will connect the three disciplines of Landscape Architecture, Interior Architecture and Architecture, to provide students with the specific technical/skills-based learning required for these three disciplines.

15 pts • (P) SARC 216; (X) ARCI/INTA/LAND 311

1/3 • CRN 34107 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 315 – Critical Urbanism Aotearoa New Zealand / Tātari Kāinga Rua

This course critically explores concepts and practices which have influenced the production of space, form and meaning in Aotearoa New Zealand cities. Current urban issues and their relationship to historical and contemporary political, socio-cultural and environmental paradigms are examines alongside emerging urban practices motivated by justness.

15 pts • (P) 60 points at 200- level from the BAS or BBSc schedules or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 34108 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 320 – Topic in Digital Computation / Tātai Hangarau

.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2024

SARC 321 – Construction / Te Mahi Waihanga

Medium-scale building construction with relevant building materials, key elements, construction technologies, construction sequences and building processes.

15 pts • (P) SARC 221

2/3 • CRN 18296 • Mon, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 323 – Colour, Pattern, Light / Ngā Āhuatanga o te Ata me te Pō

Study of colour, pattern and lighting concepts and technologies and their meaning, role and creative applications.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 212 or SARC 216

1/3 • CRN 18297 • Wed 2.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 328 – Topic in Current Research in Architecture / Ngā Rangahau o te Wā i te Mahi Whakarākei / Prison Architecture: Buildings, Policy and Representation

This course examines built and non-built aspects of prisons including architectural history (e.g., planning and interior environmental qualities), policy, and cultural images of prisons, including film, digital and heritage representations of prisons. International examples will be drawn on, but there will be particular attention paid to New Zealand prison architecture.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND

Not offered in 2024

SARC 331 – Sustainable and Regenerative Design / Te Whakarauoratanga o ngā Mahi Whakarākei

This course explores sustainable and regenerative design principles and applications across a range of designed and built environments. Emphasis is on operation at the leading edge of theoretical and philosophical thinking in the field and to explore and employ critical thinking and innovative solutions. The Living Building Challenge will provide a key reference point for the work in the course.

15 pts • (P) SARC (or BILD) 232 (X) BILD 331;

1/3 • CRN 35108 • Wed 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 351 – Urban Design Theory and Practice / Te Mahi me ngā Kōrero o te Ao Kikokiko

Introduction to the history, theory and practice of urban design. Conceptual tools and practices for analyzing, designing and implementing change in the built environment of cities.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

1/3 • CRN 18299 • Tue 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

SARC 352 – Pacific Designed Environments / Ngā Taiao o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa

Introduction to issues relating to designed and built environments of the Pacific region. Examination of contemporary conditions within a wider spatial and historical framework. In addition to a central focus on the settlement of Aotearoa/New Zealand, course material extends to other cultures within the greater Pacific rim.

15 pts • (P) one of ARCI 251, BILD 251, INTA 251, LAND 251 or GLBL 201

2/3 • CRN 18300 • Tue 3-5pm [Te Aro], Fri 10.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 34156 • [Te Aro]

SARC 353 – History of Architecture / Ngā Kōrero o Mua o Te Mahi Whakarākei

Examines paradigm shifts in architectural thinking. Course material emphasises enduring examples of great architecture which reflect the prevailing social and cultural standards of their respective periods.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 251

Not offered in 2024

SARC 354 – Heritage Conservation / Ngā Mahi Tiaki i ngā Whare Whakaniko

This course introduces the why, what and how of heritage conservation. Historic and contemporary approaches to heritage conservation are discussed with recent case studies (including building visits) used as vehicles for the discussion. The purpose and role of a Conservation Plan is explored. Research methods for eliciting historical information specific to a building or interior are introduced and practised. Methods of assessing heritage significance and value and of making recommendations for conservation activity are explored.

15 pts • (P) 30 pts 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC; (X) SARC 454

1/3 • CRN 18302 • Wed 8.30-10.30 [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

SARC 362 – Introduction to Practice and Management / He Tīmatanga Kōrero mō Te Mahi me Te Whakahaere

Management and procurement/development, examining the theories and ideas that underpin planning, organising, directing and controlling the use of resources over time. Topics include the principles of management, organisational development, basic finance, costing, development feasibility, valuation theory and quantitative analysis relevant to the construction industry.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts 200-level ARCI/BILD/INTA/LAND/SARC

1/3 • CRN 18304 • Mon 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

SARC 363 – Digital Representation and Documentation / Te Mahi a te Ao Hangarau

Computer applications as aids to visualisation and information management.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc, BDI schedules; (X) SARC 463

3/3 • CRN 18285 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 365 – Drawing / He Tuhituhi

Studio-based course covering creative and interpretive aspects of drawing with an emphasis on developing analytical and critical interrogation through manual graphic processes and across a range of subjects, media types and applied subjects. Discussed as principles and expanded upon in application, are the conventions and standards of architectural representation common to drawing practice.

15 pts • (P) One of ARCI/INTA/LAND 211

1/3 • CRN 18287 • ^ Thu 8.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SARC 371 – International Field Study / Te Mahi a te Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed spaces and sites with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the historical and cultural contexts they are part of and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level ARCI/INTA/LAND/SARC pts; (X) SARC 471

Not offered in 2024

SARC 384 – Special Topic: Design Thinking Business

This course examines ways that business contributes to architecture and design enterprises. It also reviews a range of ways that creative strategic design-thinking contributes to various business enterprises. The course will look at how this is applied to architecture by looking at essential business concepts, tactics for starting practices and strategies for growing an established enterprise. In business application, it examines design-based concepts around Lean, Agile, Design Thinking and Scrum. The combined learnings will provide graduates with tools to open new business opportunities inside design and architecture, plus a broader set of transferable design-thinking skills to take into other businesses.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS and BDI schedules; (X) SARC 484

3/3 • CRN 33522 • tba [Distance]

SARC 386 – Special Topic: Retail Experience Architectural Design

Investigate the future of retail design relevant to the 21st century, including research concepts underlying ethical branding, products and scripting of customer journeys. Develop a design proposal for the composition and atmosphere of retail space providing extraordinary customer experience for a brand and its products.

15 pts • (P) ARCI 212 or BILD 251 or INTA 212 or LAND 212

1/3 • CRN 18293 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 387 – Independent Study / Kaupapa Rangahau Motuhake

This course is a supervised programme of research and study on selected themes. Independent Study Projects are available under exceptional circumstances and must be approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 23176 • tba [Te Aro]

2/3 • CRN 18333 • tba [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 32233 • tba [Te Aro]

SARC 388 – Psychology and Behaviour in the Built Environment / Te Mātai Hinengaro me te Whanonga i ngā Whare Hangahanga

Application of psychological theory, principles and research to the study of human interaction with the built environment across a range of settings. This course focuses on how to improve usability, health, well-being and work performance in relationship to space and place. The course covers human and environment interaction theory, systems theory, psychology and design research methods, consequences of poorly informed design decisions and environmental stressors.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts from the BAS, BBSc schedules or GLBL 201 (X) SARC 384, 484 (2017-2019)

1/3 • CRN 32132 • Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

Chemistry

See also Biomedical Science

CHEM 113 – Concepts of Chemistry

CHEM 113 investigates electronic structures and properties of atoms, bonding and periodic trends. This knowledge will be applied to chemical processes including equilibria, redox reactions, transformations of acids and bases and organic reactions leading to an understanding why reactions occur. You will study the properties of organic compounds including nomenclature, isomerism, and the identification and reactivity of organic functional groups.

15 pts • (X) CHEM 114, 115, 121, 122

1/3 • CRN 17147 • Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CHEM 121 – Chemistry of Life

CHEM 121 is designed for you to understand fundamental chemistry and how it is applied to the biological sciences. This course will cover core chemistry topics including principles of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding and reactivity, thermodynamics and kinetics. You will explore the application of chemistry in biologically relevant systems.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 113 or 16 NCEA Level 3 Achievement Standard credits in Chemistry including 2 external standards, or equivalent background (X) CHEM 114

2/3 • CRN 35059 • Tue, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

CHEM 122 – Chemistry of Matter, Energy and the Environment

CHEM 122 considers the chemical structure and properties of matter and uses this knowledge to explore the energetics of chemical processes and how this relates to the modern energy landscape. You will then apply this knowledge to investigate the chemistry of environmental systems. A central theme that is embedded within all topics is how chemical technologies can be used for our sustainable future.

15 pts • (P) CHEM 113 or 16 NCEA Level 3 Achievement Standard credits in Chemistry including two external standards, or equivalent background; MATH 132 or 12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics including one of 91575, 91577, 91578 or 91579

2/3 • CRN 35060 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHEM 191 – Introductory Chemistry

This summer bridging course provides basic chemical concepts and laboratory skills as a preparation for the study of chemistry at university level. It is designed for those with little or no background in chemistry or to be a refresher course for those who have studied chemistry in the past. In this course you will study the big ideas of science and chemistry, explore the fundamental building blocks of matter, and the connections between energy and reactions. You will also investigate these concepts whilst building your practical skills over a three day block in the laboratory.

15 pts • (X) CHEM 113, 114, 121, 122

3/3 • CRN 23006 • tba [Kelburn]

CHEM 207 – Experimental Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Chemistry is a science embedded within the physical world. In this practical, laboratory-based course, you will gain hands-on experience in modern chemical experimental approaches. You will develop skills in safe chemical handling, using and analysing instrumental data, and will link macroscopic observation with the microscopic world of chemicals. Additionally, workshops and computer simulations will supplement your learning in how to interpret complex data patters to identify molecules and their behaviours at the atomic scale.

20 pts • (P) 15 points from CHEM 121, 122 (or 114, 115) (X) CHEM 205 or 206

2/3 • CRN 36108 • [Kelburn]

CHEM 208 – Chemistry of Life: Organic, Biomolecular and Medicinal Chemistry

Explore the structure and reactivity of organic and biomolecular compounds pertinent to metabolic processes and medicines. You will learn about molecular structure, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopy, and the application of these concepts to the chemistry of alkene, carbonyl, alkyl, and aromatic compounds. The relevance of this chemistry to drug development and understanding the molecular foundations of living systems will be exemplified.

20 pts • (P) 15 points from CHEM 121 (or 114); (X) CHEM 201

1/3 • CRN 36109 • Mon, Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CHEM 210 – Chemistry: Matter and Reactivity

Explore key topics for understanding chemical systems; from molecules to materials, their reactions, changes and transformations.  Gain a fundamental ramework for how and why molecules/materials exist in the forms they do.  Explore how energy and light are important to chemical systems and chemical reactivity.  Understand the reactions molecules/materials undergo, and the reasons, dynamics and "why" of chemical change. Real-world examples illustrate chemical applications.

20 pts • (P) CHEM 122 (or 114); (X) CHEM 202 or 203

2/3 • CRN 36111 • tba [Kelburn]

CHEM 307 – Advanced Experimental Techniques

Refine and expand your experimental and computational skills, exploring practical aspects of chemistry. Choose to build techniques across the breadth of chemistry or focus on medicinal chemistry related areas (depending on your individual interests and background). You will develop synthetic, computational and instrumental analysis skills, and investigate principles of measurement. You will also develop communication skills through the presentation of technical information and data in written, digital and oral formats.

20 pts • (P) CHEM 207 (or one of CHEM 205, 206) (X) CHEM 305 or CHEM 306

1/3 • CRN 36112 • [Kelburn]

CHEM 308 – Chemistry of Life: Molecules and Mechanisms

Explore the structure and reactivity of organic compounds. You will learn about molecular tructure and reactivity through spectroscopy, reactions of carbohydrate compounds, pericyclic chemistry, mechanistic principles and retrosynthesis.

20 pts • (P) CHEM 208 (or 201); (X) CHEM 301

Not offered in 2024

CHEM 309 – Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

Explore the use of chemical tools for the study of biochemical pathways and the development of pharmaceutical drugs. Topics will include the design and synthesis of chemical probes, principles of medicinal chemistry, chemical biology, biosynthesis and an introduction to synthetic strategy.

20 pts • (P) CHEM 208 (or 201)

2/3 • CRN 36114 • Mon, Tue, Thu 9-10 [Kelburn], Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHEM 310 – Reactivity, Molecules and Materials

Explore the structure and reactivity of molecules and materials. You will learn about molecular structures, material structures, and their reactivities, properties and applications. The course discusses structure-property relationships as a foundation towards molecular reactivities, and materials applications in advanced technologies.

20 pts • (P) CHEM 210 or (CHEM 202 and CHEM 203) (X) any of CHEM 302, 303 or CHEM 311, 312 in 2024

1/3 • CRN 36115 • Mon, Tue, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

CHEM 311 – Special Topic: Chemistry of Materials

This course will enable students that lack the full prerequisites for CHEM 322 to do the inorganic and materials sections of CHEM 322, in combination with a directed individual study component. The course explores the structure and reactivity of molecules and materials. You will learn about molecular structures, material structures, and their properties and applications. The course discusses structure-property relationships, and materials applications in advanced technologies.

20 pts • (P) CHEM 202; (X) CHEM 222, CHEM 302, 322, 341

1/3 • CRN 36116 • tba [Kelburn]

CHEM 312 – Special Topic: Chemical Reactivity of Materials

This course will enable students that lack the full prerequisites for CHEM 322 to do the reactivity and materials sections of CHEM 322, in combination with a directed individual study component. The course explores the structure and reactivity of molecules and materials. You will learn about molecular structures, material structures, and their properties and applications. The course discusses structure-property relationships as a foundation towards molecular reactivities, and materials applications in advanced technologies.

20 pts • (P) CHEM 203; (X) CHEM 222, CHEM 302, 322

1/3 • CRN 36117 • tba [Kelburn]

Chinese

ASIA 111 – Introduction to Asian Histories and Cultures

Asia is significant to New Zealand’s future. But how much do you know about this incredibly vast, dynamic and diverse region? In this course we will discuss key societal aspects of Northeast, Southeast and South Asia. You will learn about the basic characteristics of the cultures including geographical locations, peoples, religions, histories and traditions. This course will allow you to understand the challenges and opportunities that lie in the region and will prepare you to continue study in many areas with an international focus, such as International Relations, International Business, Languages, Security Studies, or Global Studies. This course will suit all students who are interested in an internationally focussed degree and future career.

20 pts

3/3 • CRN 30037 • [Kelburn]

CHIN 101 – Chinese Language 1A

This is a beginners Chinese (Mandarin) course developing basics in reading, writing, speaking and listening in Modern Standard Chinese, using pinyin and simplified characters. Various aspects of Chinese culture will also be introduced. This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language.

20 pts • (X) prior knowledge as determined by the academic teaching staff in Chinese

1/3 • CRN 17138 • Mon, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

CHIN 102 – Chinese Language 1B

This course is a continuation of CHIN 101, further developing students' Chinese (Mandarin) language skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening at an elementary level. Various aspects of Chinese culture will also be introduced.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 101

2/3 • CRN 17044 • Mon, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 112 – Introduction to Chinese Civilisation

This is a survey course introducing some of the salient features of Chinese civilisation from prehistoric times to the present century. Topics include literature, thought and scholarship, religious beliefs, art, and the cultural and social achievements of the main dynasties.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

FHSS 110 – Exploring the World through Languages and Cultures

How do languages and cultures interrelate, and how can we read them in the world around us? This course provides students with insights into how languages and cultures shape and reflect identity by critically engaging with a wide variety of global texts and objects located in New Zealand’s capital city and beyond. Texts are studied in English translation.

20 pts

3/3 • CRN 33030 • [Distance]

CHIN 201 – Chinese Language 2A

This course builds on the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills acquired in CHIN 102. Special attention is placed on developing students’ ability to communicate in Chinese in basic social interactions and in further understanding Chinese society and culture through discussions on selected topics.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 102; (X) CHIN 211

1/3 • CRN 31095 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 202 – Chinese Language 2B

As for CHIN 201, with further development of students' Chinese communication skills and their understanding of Chinese language and culture.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 201 or 211; (X) CHIN 212

2/3 • CRN 31096 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 213 – Chinese Culture Through Literature and Film

A study of key aspects of Chinese culture through analysis of selected literary texts and films in their social and historical context. No prior knowledge of Chinese language is necessary.

20 pts • (P) 40 points

Not offered in 2024

FHSS 210 – Language Study Abroad

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 100-level points at Victoria. The course is available both to students who have studied the language before and to students with no previous knowledge of the language. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 100-level and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 28218 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CHIN 301 – Chinese Language 3A

This course builds on the language skills acquired at 200 level. Cultural topics reinforce understanding of the language and people.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 202 or 212; (X) CHIN 311

1/3 • CRN 31097 • Mon, Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

CHIN 302 – Chinese Language 3B

The further study of language skills with translation both from and into Chinese, and communication in Chinese.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 301 or 311; (X) CHIN 312

2/3 • CRN 31098 • Tue, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

CHIN 313 – Classical Chinese Language and Literature

An introductory course in the classical language, employing selected historical and philosophical texts from the pre-Qin and Han periods. Students are also instructed in the use of a range of sinological reference materials.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 202 or 212

2/3 • CRN 6621 • Wed, Fri 1-3pm [Kelburn]

CHIN 314 – Advanced Chinese Composition and Translation

A course for native speakers and advanced learners of Chinese that gives emphasis to written Chinese composition, both formal and informal, along with practical translation both to and from Chinese.

20 pts • (P) CHIN 302 or 312

Not offered in 2024

FHSS 310 – Study Abroad for Language Students

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 points of relevant language acquisition courses at Victoria. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points of language study at 200-level or higher and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 25151 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Classical Performance

PERF 101 – Performance Principal Study 1A

Development of technical and musical competency on the student’s chosen instrument or voice. This course is open to students studying either Classical or Jazz Performance.

20 pts • (P) Audition (X) PERF 120, 121, 130;

1/3 • CRN 33086 • [Kelburn]

PERF 102 – Performance Principal Study 1B

Development of technical and musical competency on the student’s chosen instrument or voice. This course is open to students studying either Classical or Jazz Performance.

20 pts • (P) PERF 101 or audition; (X) PERF 120, 121, 130

2/3 • CRN 33087 • [Kelburn]

PERF 105 – Performance Skills 1A

Development of practical performance skills that support and enhance students’ principal study. Students participate in two approved areas of study, dependent on the student’s instrument/voice.

10 pts • (P) P One of PERF 101, 102, 106, or audition; (X) PERF 122, 132, 133, 134, 136

1/3 • CRN 33088 • [Kelburn]

PERF 106 – Performance Skills 1B

Development of practical performance skills that support and enhance students’ principal study. Students participate in two approved areas of study, dependent on the student’s instrument/voice.

10 pts • (P) One of PERF 101, 102, 105 or audition; (X) PERF 122, 132, 133, 134, 136

2/3 • CRN 33089 • [Kelburn]

PERF 165 – Project in Performance 1A

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

15 pts • (P) Audition

1/3 • CRN 19882 • (L1) tba [Kelburn]

1+2/3 • CRN 30187 • (L2) [Kelburn]

PERF 166 – Project in Performance 1B

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

15 pts • (P) Audition

1/3 • CRN 15783 • (L1) [Kelburn]

1+2/3 • CRN 33462 • (L2) tba [Kelburn]

PERF 167 – Project in Performance 1C

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

10 pts • (P) Audition

1/3 • CRN 33475 • [Kelburn]

PERF 168 – Project in Performance 1D

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline. 100% internal assessment.

10 pts • (P) Audition

Not offered in 2024

PERF 201 – Classical Performance Principal Study 2A

Further development of technical and musical competency, as well as artistic and stylistic insight, to perform at an intermediate level on the student’s chosen instrument or voice.

20 pts • (P) PERF 101 & 102; (X) PERF 230

1/3 • CRN 33090 • Fri 1.30-3pm [Kelburn]

PERF 202 – Classical Performance Principal Study 2B

Further development of technical and musical competency, as well as artistic and stylistic insight, to perform at an intermediate level on the student’s chosen instrument or voice.

20 pts • (P) PERF 101 & 102; (X) PERF 230

2/3 • CRN 33091 • Fri 1.30-3pm [Kelburn]

PERF 205 – Performance Skills 2A

Further development of practical performance skills that support and enhance students’ principal study. Students participate in three approved areas of study, dependent on the student’s instrument/voice.

15 pts • (P) PERF 105 & 106, or audition; (X) PERF 222, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236

1/3 • CRN 33092 • [Kelburn]

PERF 206 – Performance Skills 2B

Further development of practical performance skills that support and enhance students’ principal study. Students participate in three approved areas of study, dependent on the student’s instrument/voice.

15 pts • (P) PERF 105 & 106, or audition; (X) PERF 222, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236

2/3 • CRN 33093 • [Kelburn]

PERF 207 – Performance Extended Skills 2A

Development of technical and musical skills in an ancillary performance competency. Approved streams include Latin and jazz fusion ensembles.

10 pts • (P) PERF 101 & 102, or audition (X) PERF 210, 223, 224;

Not offered in 2024

PERF 208 – Performance Extended Skills 2B

Development of technical and musical skills in an ancillary performance competency. Approved streams include conducting, Latin and jazz fusion ensembles. In 2024, only the classical stream is offered.

10 pts • (P) PERF 101 & 102, or audition (for latin/fusion); or two of MUSC 166, 167, 266 (for conducting); (X) PERF 210, 223, 224

2/3 • CRN 33095 • [Kelburn]

PERF 211 – Jazz Performance Principal Study 2A

Further development, through individual lessons, workshops and self-directed learning of technical and musical competency on the student’s primary instrument/voice, along with greater artistic and stylistic insight.

20 pts • (P) PERF 101 & 102 (X) PERF 220, 221;

1/3 • CRN 33096 • Tue 10-12 [Kelburn], Fri 1.30-3pm [Kelburn]

PERF 212 – Jazz Performance Principal Study 2B

Further development, through individual lessons, workshops and self-directed learning of technical and musical competency on the student’s primary instrument/voice, along with greater artistic and stylistic insight.

20 pts • (P) PERF 101 & 102; (X) PERF 220, 221

2/3 • CRN 33097 • Tue 10-12 [Kelburn], Fri 1.30-3pm [Kelburn]

PERF 255 – Performance in Ethnomusicology: Māori Music/Gamelan

In this course you will learn about the music and culture of the Asia-Pacific region through hands-on engagement with either Māori music or Javanese Gamelan. By participating in rehearsals and performances, and researching the broader social context of the music, you will develop a holistic and experiential understanding of one of these rich and dynamic musical traditions. No audition is required to take the course. In 2024, only the Gamelan is offered.

15 pts • (P) 40 100-level points (X) PERF 151, 250, 251, 252;

2/3 • CRN 33098 • [Kelburn]

PERF 265 – Intermediate Project in Performance 2A

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

15 pts • (P) Audition

Not offered in 2024

PERF 266 – Intermediate Project in Performance 2B

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

15 pts • (P) Audition

1/3 • CRN 15798 • (L1) [Kelburn]

1+2/3 • CRN 33463 • (L1) tba [Kelburn]

PERF 267 – Intermediate Project in Performance 2C

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline. 100% internal assessment.

15 pts • (P) Audition

Not offered in 2024

PERF 268 – Intermediate Project in Performance 2D

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

15 pts • (P) Audition

Not offered in 2024

PERF 301 – Classical Performance Principal Study 3A

Further development of technical and musical competency and artistic and stylistic insight to perform an expanded range of repertoire of the student’s chosen instrument or voice.

20 pts • (P) PERF 201 & 202 (X) PERF 330;

1/3 • CRN 33099 • Fri 1.30-3pm [Kelburn]

PERF 302 – Classical Performance Principal Study 3B

Further development of technical and musical competency and artistic and stylistic insight to perform an expanded range of repertoire of the student’s chosen instrument or voice.

20 pts • (P) PERF 201 & 202; (X) PERF 330

2/3 • CRN 33100 • Fri 1.30-3pm [Kelburn]

PERF 305 – Performance Skills 3A

Advanced development of practical performance skills that support and enhance students’ principal study. Students participate in three approved areas of study, dependant on the student’s instrument/voice.

15 pts • (P) PERF 205 & 206, or audition; (X) PERF 322, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336

1/3 • CRN 33101 • [Kelburn]

PERF 306 – Performance Skills 3B

Advanced development of practical performance skills that support and enhance students’ principal study. Students participate in three approved areas of study, dependant on the student’s instrument/voice.

15 pts • (P) PERF 205 & 206, or audition; (X) PERF 322, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336

2/3 • CRN 33102 • [Kelburn]

PERF 307 – Performance Extended Skills 3A

Advanced development of technical and musical skills in an ancillary performance competency. Students choose from a Latin ensemble or jazz fusion ensemble.

10 pts • (P) PERF 101, PERF 102, PERF 105 and PERF 106, or by audition (X) PERF 324

Not offered in 2024

PERF 308 – Performance Extended Skills 3B

Advanced development of technical and musical skills in an ancillary performance competency. Students choose from a Latin ensemble or jazz fusion ensemble.

10 pts • (P) PERF 211 & 212, or audition; (X) PERF 324

2/3 • CRN 33104 • [Kelburn]

PERF 311 – Jazz Performance Principal Study 3A

Development to an advanced level of technical and musical competency on the student’s primary instrument/voice.

20 pts • (P) PERF 211 & 212 (X) PERF 320;

1/3 • CRN 33105 • Mon 1-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1.30-3pm [Kelburn]

PERF 312 – Jazz Performance Principal Study 3B

Development to an advanced level of technical and musical competency on the student’s primary instrument/voice.

20 pts • (P) PERF 211 & 212; (X) PERF 320

2/3 • CRN 33106 • Mon 1-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 1.30-3pm [Kelburn]

PERF 365 – Advanced Project in Performance 3A

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

20 pts • (P) Audition

Not offered in 2024

PERF 366 – Advanced Project in Performance 3B

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) Audition

1+2/3 • CRN 33464 • [Kelburn]

PERF 367 – Advanced Project in Performance 3C

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

15 pts • (P) Audition

1/3 • CRN 36167 • (L1) tba [Kelburn]

1+2/3 • CRN 19895 • (L6) tba [Kelburn]

PERF 368 – Advanced Project in Performance 3D

Exploration of an area of learning specific to the research interests and activity of a music staff member. A proposal outlining the intended work for this course must be approved by the Director of the NZSM prior to the enrolment deadline.

15 pts • (P) Audition

2/3 • CRN 15825 • [Kelburn]

Classical Studies, Greek and Latin

CLAS 106 – Ancient Civilisations: the Greeks and the Romans

The origins of Western culture in Ancient Europe: an introduction to ancient Greek and Roman civilization – history, war and conquest, politics, society, and culture.

20 pts • (X) CLAS 104, 105

1/3 • CRN 30076 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 111 – Myth and Mythologies

CLAS 111 is a study of ancient myth in literature (poetry, drama, historiography, and other genres) and art. We will explore different ways of interpreting myths and seek to understand the meaning of myths in their contexts. Prominent themes include creation, gods, heroes, sex/gender, violence, and civilization.

20 pts • (X) CLAS 204, 304

2/3 • CRN 27016 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

GREE 101 – Introduction to Greek

An introduction to ancient Greek for beginners, with emphasis on the acquisition of basic reading skills.

20 pts • (X) GREE 112

1/3 • CRN 32058 • Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

GREE 102 – Elementary Greek

A study of ancient Greek, assuming basic reading skills, with emphasis on the reading of texts in Attic Greek.

20 pts • (P) GREE 101 or 112; (X) GREE 113

2/3 • CRN 32057 • Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

LATI 101 – Introduction to Latin

An introduction to the Latin Language for beginners, with emphasis on the acquisition of basic reading skills.

20 pts • (X) LATI 103

1/3 • CRN 32050 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

LATI 102 – Elementary Latin

A study of Latin, assuming basic reading skills, with emphasis on the reading of selected texts.

20 pts • (P) LATI 101 or 103 or a required standard in Latin; (X) LATI 104

2/3 • CRN 32051 • Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

CLAS 203 – Greek and Roman Drama

A study of the Greek and Roman dramatists with special emphasis on the theatrical techniques of the authors and the means of production in the ancient theatre. Co-taught with CLAS 303. Offered in alternate years.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 303

Not offered in 2024

CLAS 205 – Anthony and Cleopatra

A close study, through history, literature, and art, of the lives and careers of Mark Anthony and Cleopatra, with special attention given to their legacy both in the immediate aftermath of the age of Augustus and also in modern literature and art (including film and television).

20 pts • (P) 40 points (X) CLAS 305; CLAS 212 or 312 (2015, 2016, 2018)

2/3 • CRN 33116 • Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 206 – Animals and Monsters In Ancient Greece and Rome

This course will look at the ways in which animals are represented and used in ancient Greek and Roman literature, myth, art, religion, philosophy and everyday life.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 212 in (2017, 2019, 2021), CLAS 312 in 2017, CLAS 306 in 2023

Not offered in 2024

CLAS 207 – Roman Social History

A study of the main features of Roman social history from the time of Augustus to AD 200. Topics include class structure, law, education, the family, slavery, poverty and public entertainment. Offered in alternate years.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 307

Not offered in 2024

CLAS 208 – Greek Society

A study of ancient Greek society, particularly Athens in the Classical period. Topics include sex, gender, politics, education, entertainment, and food and agriculture. Co-taught with CLAS 308.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 308

2/3 • CRN 807 • Mon, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CLAS 210 – Greek and Roman Epic

The development of Classical Epic, from Homer to Vergil and his successors. What is distinctive about epic artistry and the connection of epic poetry to the societies that value it. Co-taught with CLAS 310. Offered in alternate years. 50% internal assessment, 50% examination.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 310

Not offered in 2024

CLAS 211 – Myth and Storytelling

A study of the diverse functions of myth and storytelling in Greek and Roman literature and society, and the intersection of mythical and rational modes of thought.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 311

1/3 • CRN 6652 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

GREE 201 – Intermediate Greek

An integrated course of literature and language.

20 pts • (P) GREE 102 or 113; (X) GREE 215

1/3 • CRN 32061 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

GREE 202 – Greek Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 201 or 215 ; (X) GREE 216

2/3 • CRN 32059 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

LATI 201 – Latin Literature and Language A

An integrated course of literature and language designed to enhance the ability of students to read Latin more easily and develop an appreciation of Latin Literature.

20 pts • (P) LATI 102 or 104 or a required standard in Latin; (X) LATI 213

1/3 • CRN 32052 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

LATI 202 – Latin Literature and Language B

An integrated course of literature and language to build on LATI 201 and further develop reading skills and literary appreciation.

20 pts • (P) LATI 201 or 213; (X) LATI 214

2/3 • CRN 32053 • Mon, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

CLAS 301 – Death, Dying and Disposal in Ancient Greece

This course examines ancient Greek attitudes a attitudes and practices regarding death and dying through a wide range of different material, including material culture, literature, and historical sources. Topics include burial practices, 'good' and 'bad' deaths, mythical explorations of death, philosophical approaches, and views of the afterlife.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200-299; (X) CLAS 214 (2015), CLAS 314 (2015, 2018)

Not offered in 2024

CLAS 303 – Greek and Roman Drama

A study of the Greek and Roman dramatists with special emphasis on the theatrical techniques of the authors and the means of production in the ancient theatre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 203

Not offered in 2024

CLAS 305 – Antony and Cleopatra

A close study, through history, literature, and art, of the lives and careers of Mark Antony and Cleopatra, with special attention given to their legacy both in the immediate aftermath of the age of Augustus and also in modern literature and art (including film and television). Co-taught with CLAS 205.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 205; CLAS 212, 312 in 2015, 2016, 2018

2/3 • CRN 36041 • Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 307 – Roman Social History

A study of the main features of Roman social history from the time of Augustus to AD 200. Topics include class structure, law, education, the family, slavery, poverty and public entertainment. Co-taught with CLAS 207. Offered in alternate years.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 207

Not offered in 2024

CLAS 308 – Greek Society

A study of ancient Greek society, particularly Athens in the Classical period. Topics include sex, gender, politics, education, entertainment, and food and agriculture. Co-taught with CLAS 208.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 208

2/3 • CRN 817 • Mon, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CLAS 310 – Greek and Roman Epic

The development of Classical Epic, from Homer to Vergil and his successors. What is distinctive about epic artistry and the connection of epic poetry to the societies that value it that value it. Offered in alternate years.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 210

Not offered in 2024

CLAS 311 – Myth and Storytelling

A study of the diverse functions of myth and storytelling in Greek and Roman literature and society, and the intersection of mythical and rational modes of thought. Co-taught with CLAS 211. Offered in alternate years.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 211

1/3 • CRN 6653 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 312 – Special Topic: Playing the Ancient World: Ancient Greece and Rome in Video Games

Drawing mythical and historical material from the ancient world, modern games like Dungeons and Dragons and Assassin’s Creed present alternate visions of the past and make claims about history and culture. This course introduces the basics of (historical) game analysis and examines how analogue and digital games use ancient material.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200-299, 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 9131 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

CLAS 315 – Directed Individual Study

Students will undertake an approved, supervised programme of research and study on a selected theme/topic in Classical Studies.

20 pts • (P) permission of the programme director

1/3 • CRN 36118 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CLAS 316 – Directed Individual Study

Students will undertake an approved, supervised programme of research and study on a selected theme/topic in Classical Studies.

20 pts • (P) permission of the programme director

2/3 • CRN 36119 • ^ tba [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CLAS 320 – Greek Field Trip

A study of various Greek archaeological sites with special emphasis on sites in Crete. Co-taught with CLAS 420. Note: A maximum of 20 students can be accepted for this and CLAS 420 in any year. An extra fee beyond that for a 20-point course will apply.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 420

Not offered in 2024

GREE 301 – Advanced Greek Literature A

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 202 or 216; (X) GREE 315

1/3 • CRN 32060 • Tue, Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn]

GREE 302 – Advanced Greek Literature B

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) GREE 202 or GREE 216; (X) GREE 316

2/3 • CRN 32085 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

LATI 301 – Advanced Latin Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language, and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) LATI 202 or LATI 214; (X) LATI 330

Not offered in 2024

LATI 302 – Advanced Latin Literature

Literary and/or historical texts for translation, comment on subject matter, language and literary setting.

20 pts • (P) LATI 202 or LATI 214; (X) LATI 331

2/3 • CRN 32055 • Mon, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience

PSYC 242 – Experimental Research Methods

Experiments in psychology allow researchers to discover the causes of behaviour. In this course, students will learn how to design and conduct psychology experiments, to analyse data collected using common experimental designs, and to report the results using the conventions of scientific writing.

15 pts • (P) PSYC 121 or 122; STAT 193 (or MATH 177 or QUAN 102)

2/3 • CRN 33248 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

Cognitive Science

COGS 101 – Kinds of Minds

What is a mind? And who has one? In this course, we will use a multidisciplinary approach to understanding human, animal, and artificial minds. Drawing on research and methodologies in the cognitive sciences of psychology, biology, and computer science, we will explore the many varieties of minds in the natural and virtual world, seeking to determine what minds actually are.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 36037 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

Commerce

FCOM 111 – Government, Law and Business

This course sets the context for the BCom degree acquainting students with the legal and governmental environment that New Zealand firms operate in.

15 pts • (X) FCOM 110

1/3 • CRN 17242 • (L1) Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 17243 • (L2) Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 28422 • Tue, Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

FCOM 204 – Sustainability, Business, Society

This course examines the concept of sustainability in the context of societal and business value shifts. Problem-based learning approaches are utilised to explore interplays among sustainability dimensions - economic, socio-cultural and environmental – and operationalisations from perspectives such as information systems, marketing and public policy.

15 pts • (P) 30 points

Not offered in 2024

Commercial Law

COML 111 – Law for Business

A general introduction to the legal issues encountered in small and start-up businesses. A wide variety of legal issues will be covered in this context, including the business structure, contract law, consumer law, the law relating to property, including intellectual property and dispute resolution and business failure.

15 pts

Not offered in 2024

COML 203 – Legal Environment of Business

An overview of the legal system and the legislative process with an emphasis on their impact on the business environment, including elements of contract, administrative law and the law of organisations.

15 pts • (P) FCOM 111; (X) two of LAWS 121-123

1/3 • CRN 6748 • Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea], Fri 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 204 – Law of Organisations

An examination of the law of business organisations.

15 pts • (P) COML 203 or 35 LAWS pts; (X) COML 303, LAWS 360, 361

2/3 • CRN 19764 • Tue, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 205 – Consumer Law

The law relating to consumers.

15 pts • (P) COML 203 or 35 LAWS pts

2/3 • CRN 18309 • Wed 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 302 – The Law of Work

Work is of vital importance to the economy, businesses, and the well-being of individuals, and there is an increasing demand for ethical and sustainable work practices, ie practices that are legal, fair, and decent. In this course students will learn about the legal framework of work from a practical and ethical perspective, considering its impact on individuals and businesses, as well as critically reflecting on, and formulating proposals for, possible improvements to the law.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts; (X) LAWS 355

1/3 • CRN 902 • Wed 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea], Fri 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 306 – Law of International Business

This course examines the law and practice affecting international business, including New Zealand's multilateral trading relationships, the law affecting international commercial transactions including international sales, methods of doing business abroad and the international protection of intellectual property rights.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts; (X) LAWS 354

2/3 • CRN 910 • Tue, Fri 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

COML 307 – Legal Issues for e-Commerce

Selected aspects of the law relating to e-commerce, including electronic transactions, intellectual property, privacy, consumer payment and protection, cross-border concerns and tax implications.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts

Not offered in 2024

COML 308 – Marketing Law

This course examines selected legal issues affecting the marketing of a new product, from its inception and development to its promotion and distribution. To a lesser extent, legal issues affecting the marketing of a new service are also considered.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts

2/3 • CRN 6734 • Tue, Thu 9.30-10.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 309 – Banking Law and Regulation in New Zealand

Selected areas from the law of banking, including bank-customer relationship, negotiable instruments, liability of paying and collecting banks, debit/credit/smart cards, electronic payments, securities for bank lending, letters of credit, and the Reserve Bank and its functions.

15 pts • (P) (COML 111, 15 200-level BCom pts) or COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts; (X) LAWS 352

1/3 • CRN 9006 • Tue 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea], Fri 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

COML 310 – Business Contracts

The law relating to business contracts.

15 pts • (P) COML 203 or 35 LAWS pts; (X) COML 305, LAWS 211

2/3 • CRN 19737 • Mon, Thu 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

COML 312 – Intellectual Property and Business Innovation

This course provides students with an understanding of intellectual property laws that are essential tools for success in an innovation-based business. The course includes lectures on the patent system, trade secrets, copyright, registered designs, trade marks and intellectual property management for business.

15 pts • (P) COML 203 or 30 LAWS pts or 15 approved 200-level pts; (X) COML 321 (2017-2019), LAWS 353

Not offered in 2024

COML 322 – Directed Individual Study

A customised course in an approved area or application of commercial law.

15 pts • (P) COML 203

Not offered in 2024

Communication

COMS 101 – Introduction to Communication Studies

The course provides students with a foundation in the theoretical principles and practices of communication. It introduces theories of how communication shapes and responds to human relationships in different interpersonal, digital/online, organisational, bicultural and intercultural contexts. This includes critical reflection on how communication processes can reproduce or challenge power relations. The factors influencing the efficacy in communication in different situations will also be discussed and analysed. Theoretical learning is applied through oral, written and/or non-verbal/visual modes of communication.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 32023 • Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn]

ICOM 101 – Introduction to Intercultural Communication

This course introduces students to the theories and practices of Intercultural Communication. Students will develop skills that are increasingly important to communicate effectively and appropriately when engaging in intercultural interactions.Considering local and global case studies, the course places particular emphasis on the way in which linguistic and cultural differences influence the production, transmission and reception of communications in all forms.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 34055 • Tue 10-12 [Kelburn]

LCCM 171 – The Art of Writing: Literary and Creative Communication

Even in a modern world dominated by visual and digital media, written communication remains the most essential and powerful tool not only in the university but in all social and professional contexts. This course draws on traditions of literary and creative writing to teach the skills of clear, persuasive, and imaginative written communication. You will analyse and create critical and personal forms of writing which may include the essay, the review, the blog, the social media post, the memoir and the polemic. The course complements the academic writing skills taught in WRIT 101.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 32025 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn]

LCCM 172 – Reading and Writing Poetry

The course teaches skills in both critical and creative reading and writing, through engagement with a wide range of poetry. You will explore the effects of concision, ornament, sentence structure, repetition, metre and form.

20 pts • (X) ENGL 172, FHSS 101 (2016–2018)

2/3 • CRN 33191 • Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-4pm [Kelburn]

COMS 201 – Approaches to Communication Research

This course develops students' critical academic literacy in communication research. We will overview key paradigms, theories, and methods used to conduct research across the spectrum of industries, platforms, texts, audiences, and everyday social interactions. We will focus on communication research in Aotearoa New Zealand including kaupapa Māori methods. Students will learn how to analyse and critique research across academia, government, and industry. With an understanding of research principles including ethics and research design, students will have an opportunity to design a research question of their own in line with their interests.

20 pts • (P) COMS 101

1/3 • CRN 32027 • Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

COMS 202 – Global Communication and Society

This course examines the complex and dynamic relationship between communication and society, including the broader social contexts of culture, politics, and economics. It incorporates global as well as Aotearoa- focused theories and practices related to communication and its role in society. Students will gain the necessary skills to analyse the historical evolution of communication theories and technologies and their relationship to social change, which includes applying these skills through case studies and multimedia projects.

20 pts • (P) COMS 101

2/3 • CRN 32029 • Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

COMS 203 – Organisational Communication

This course examines communication in organisations and workplaces. Students will be introduced to different ways to think about the relationship between communication and organisations. How do people work together in teams or groups? What role do communication technologies play in work-life conflict? How do the communicative practices of everyday work sustain the working of institutions? We will discuss case studies of New Zealand organisational communication, including communication practices within Māori and Pasifika contexts. We will also focus on applications of organisational communication theory. Students will apply their knowledge to analyse cases of communication breakdown and make recommendations for communication training.

20 pts • (P) COMS 101

Not offered in 2024

ICOM 201 – Approaches to Intercultural Communication

This course explores theories and practices of intercultural communication. Students will apply these theories and practices in case studies with a view to identifying effective communicative strategies in intercultural interactions. Topics covered include stereotyping and cross-cultural social media.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ANTH, ASIA, CHIN, CLAS, FHSS, FREN, GERM, GLBL, GREE, ITAL, JAPA, LANG, LATI, MAOR, NZSL, PASI, SAMO, SPAN

2/3 • CRN 32031 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

ICOM 202 – Intercultural Communication and Global Citizenship

This course focuses on how intercultural communication is central to global citizenship, using real and potential communication breakdowns caused by linguistic and cultural diversity. Students will develop skills and strategies to negotiate difference and address communication impasse or conflict productively.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ANTH, ASIA, CHIN, CLAS, FHSS, FREN, GERM, GLBL, GREE, ITAL, JAPA, LANG, LATI, MAOR NZSL, PASI, SAMO, SPAN

1/3 • CRN 33001 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

LCCM 271 – Literature and Journalism

This course explores the relationship between English literature and journalism from the 18th to the 21st century. It considers questions of fact and fiction, objectivity, and style, across a range of genres. Students have the opportunity to produce creative work as part of the assessment.

20 pts • (P) 40 BC or BA points; (X) ENGL 248 2017- 2018

2/3 • CRN 33007 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn]

LCCM 272 – The Art of the Essay: Critical, Public, Personal

Not merely a tool of academic assessment, the essay is an art form with a long and rich history in English and other literatures. This course analyses classic essays from the Renaissance to the 21st century, and uses these as models for students' own writing practice in both critical and personal essays in both traditional print and digital media.

20 pts • (P) 40 BC or BA points

Not offered in 2024

LCCM 273 – Digital Oceania: Writing the Pacific

The proliferation of digital media is pushing the boundaries of literary and creative communication in Oceania. This course is grounded in the digital and environmental humanities as it asks students to navigate Indigenous transformations of writing in Oceania. You will engage with digital modes of publication, including the phenomena of digital poetry, podcasts, virtual worlds, online communities, and online activism. You will hear from digital storytelling and archival experts, collaborate using digital tools, and develop your own creative and critical approaches to these literatures.

20 pts • (P) 40 BC or BA points

1/3 • CRN 33297 • Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

PCOM 201 – Introduction to Political Communication

This course is a broad introduction to the field of political communication. It introduces key political actors and institutions and their use of communication, including political parties, governments, campaign groups, voter-citizens and other organised interests in civil society. The course also covers the production and dissemination of political news and information, in both traditional legacy media and across alternative online platforms. Key political communication events, such as general elections, interest group campaigns and policy case areas are explored. In addition, the course engages with wider theory and research on public sphere theory, comparative political communication and voter perceptions and behaviour.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from POLS 100-199 or INTP 100-199

1/3 • CRN 33005 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Tue 10-12 [Kelburn]

PCOM 202 – Public Relations, Communication Power and Democracy

This course looks at the rise of the public relations and associated promotional professions and their impact on communication power and democracy. The first half of the course sets out a number of theoretical perspectives, including those from: industry, critical media and cultural studies, audiences/consumption, technological and symbolic/emotional. The second half looks at governments, corporations and interest groups, and their use of public relations and promotion to influence politics, economics and wider society. The course ends with a series of case studies such as war and conflict, science and the environment, economics and markets, welfare and housing.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from POLS 100-199 or INTP 100-199

2/3 • CRN 33006 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-2pm [Kelburn]

COMS 301 – Applied Communication Project

Students will undertake a project to demonstrate their theoretical and applied learning in communication studies. This may either take the form of a small research project using appropriate theories and method or an applied project demonstrating digital communication practice (e.g. design of a communication campaign or website). The medium of the project may be written or audio-visual. Topics require approval from the supervisor and course coordinator. Students will be supervised throughout the process, but may also undertake the project in conjunction with an external stakeholder.

20 pts • (P) COMS 201, one of COMS 202-299, SCIS 311

2/3 • CRN 33020 • (L1) Tue 10-12 [Kelburn]

2+3/3 • CRN 36175 • (L2) [Kelburn]

COMS 302 – Communication, Information and Digital Technologies

This course explores the role digital communication and information networks play in reshaping contemporary and future society. Different perspectives on digital society and the information economy are introduced. The course then examines the democratic implications of corporate and state control over the production, dissemination and discovery of information. This encompasses issues such as the commodification of information, platform capitalism, surveillance and Big Data. The course also critically evaluates the potential benefits and hazards of “smart” technologies, augmented/virtual reality and artificial intelligence.

20 pts • (P) COMS 201, one of COMS 202-299, SCIS 311

1/3 • CRN 33018 • Wed 9-11 [Kelburn]

ICOM 301 – Moving Meanings: Translation as Intercultural Communication

This course treats translation not only as it is conventionally understood (as linguistic substitution) but in its broader sense of cross-cultural communication. Analysing a range of case studies (including crowd-translation, fan-subbing, localization) students will engage with translation as interpretation and communication of linguistic and cultural diversity.

20 pts • (P) 40 points from ICOM 201-299

2/3 • CRN 33017 • Mon 10-12 [Kelburn]

ICOM 302 – Topic in Intercultural Communication in Global Contexts

This course provides students with strategies for engaging in intercultural communication in international contexts. Topics may include: global citizenship and intercultural communication; intercultural communication in situations of conflict and crisis; language, culture and mobility; digital intercultural communication and localization; indigenous perspectives on intercultural communication.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points from the BC or BA Schedules or GLBL 201

Not offered in 2024

ICOM 303 – Intercultural Communication Project

This course supports students in undertaking a research project under close supervision. Applying principles and practices covered in previous courses in the major, students will make a scholarly, civic or creative contribution to the study of intercultural communication.

20 pts • (P) 40 points from ICOM 201-299

Not offered in 2024

LCCM 310 – Special Topic: Essays on the Precipice

This course asks, ‘What is the point of the creative essay?’ in a world transformed by climate change, ecological destruction, and extinction. We will examine creative non-fiction and literary texts and write original responses to a social and natural environment on the precipice of complex and bewildering destabilisation. Model readings will include essays of witness, reportage, and advocacy, personal and lyric essays, discontinuous essays, contemporary manifestos, and works of eco-philosophy and eco-absurdism.

20 pts • (P) 40 BC or BA points

1/3 • CRN 34056 • Thu 1-4pm [Kelburn]

LCCM 371 – Public Writing

In this course you will connect your literary and creative communication skills to writing that addresses the public sphere(s). You will look at classic and contemporary examples of public and political writing, from Wollstonecraft and Orwell to Te Punga Somerville and Teaiwa. You will also create your own advocacy projects, as you explore literary forms, rhetorical strategies, and linguistic devices frequently used when engaging with public audiences.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points from the BC or BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 33298 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn]

LCCM 372 – Forms of Creative Communication: The Essay at Large

Developing the themes of LCCM 272 The Art of the Essay, this course offers advanced critical analysis and creative practice of more specialised forms of non-fictional written communication. Topics include digital writing (from the tweet to the multi-part serial essay literary journalism (profiles, opinion pieces, arts and media reviewing), travel writing, popular science writing, and (auto)biography. The course will include guest contributions from creative professionals and public intellectuals from outside the university.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points from the BC or BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

PCOM 301 – International Communication and Politics

The course examines the connections between international communication systems, flows of information, capital and media content and the international political system. Themes include communication and ‘empire’, the impact of informational capitalism and global finance for the state and national/economic sovereignty, the potential for communications technology to enhance national socio-economic development, and the impact of global news media reporting on international diplomatic relations and conflict. This course first runs in 2022.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from PCOM 200-299 or GLBL 201

Not offered in 2024

PCOM 302 – Political Speech Writing

This course examines the theory and practice of political speechwriting. In the first half of the class students will analyse a number of important historical and contemporary political speeches, identifying the rhetorical and stylistic devices employed. Theoretical literature concerning the relationship between persuasive rhetoric and political behaviour will also be explored. In the second half of the course students will develop their own political speechwriting skills with guidance from practitioner guest lecturers. This course first runs in 2022.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from PCOM 200-299

Not offered in 2024

PCOM 303 – Special Topic: Politics, Sport and Entertainment

The growing number of fictional political shows offered on streaming media services these days shows that politics plays a bigger role in entertainment today than in the past. Big sport events not only provide opportunities for symbolic political communication to the host countries, media debates about the politics of these countries also often center around them, and athletes and interest groups use them as a chance to communicate their political positions. In this course, we will look at how politics is displayed in nontraditional contexts such as sports and entertainment and how this affects citizens’ political perceptions, attitudes and behaviour.

20 pts • (P) 40 points from PCOM 200-299

2/3 • CRN 34080 • Wed 9-12 [Kelburn]

PCOM 304 – Special Topic: Tweeting to Power: Social Media Politics

This course examines the intersection between social media, politics and society, analysing platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram to understand their role in our lives, in our political discourse and in shaping our culture. We examine the positives of social media including social activism, the democratisation of news, and heightened capacities for community, communication and connectivity. We also delve into the darker side of these platforms, exploring the proliferation of fake news, hate speech, terrorist networks and gendered issues including trolling and cyber-harassment.

20 pts • (P) 40 points from PCOM 200-299

1/3 • CRN 34081 • Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-2pm [Kelburn]

Communication Design

DSDN 101 – Design Visualisation / Pohewatanga ā-Hoahoa

This course will use a range of visualisation methods to represent design concepts and elements. Methods used include hand drawing, photography, motion graphics, animation and video.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17120 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 102 – Game, Animation and Motion Design / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu, ā-Pakiwaituhi, ā-Ranga

This course will introduce students to basic principles of game design, animation and motion design. Fundamental game design concepts, such as mechanics and loops, will be explored and analysed to enable students to conceptualise and develop playable games. Alongside game design this course also introduces introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery and graphic animation.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 34100 • [Te Aro]

DSDN 103 – Critical Approaches to Design Communication/ Tukanga Arohaehae Kōrero ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to the role of visual and written communication in contemporary design practice. A range of techniques will be taught to help students communicate design concepts, critical thinking, and design processes to develop and clearly articulate their creative ideas and observations.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 34118 • Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 104 – Digital Fabrication / Waihanga Matihiko

In this course students engage with emerging technologies to visualise and create 3D forms, bodies and spaces. Students address the distinctive features of creating form and making digitally fabricated artefacts.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17152 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 111 – Design Composition / Hanganga ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to, and develops their fluency in, design vocabularies and composition specific to the configuration of design elements. Analogue and digital techniques are used to explore body, space, form and movement.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17123 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 132 – Design Narratives and Visual Storytelling / Paki ā-Hoahoa me te Pakiwaitara ā-Ataata

This course introduces students to narratives and storytelling in the context of visual design. Students will be exposed to a range of traditional and contemporary examples including Māori storytelling practice and examples from film, animation, digital and physical games and comics. Students will explore and apply the principles, structures and techniques introduced in class through linear and non-linear storytelling exercises.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

2/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 141 – Design Mediums and Processes / Ngā Huarahi me Ngā Tukanga ā-Hoahoa

This course focuses on creative exploration of materials and processes. Students will learn various manual and digital techniques and apply these to the exploration and production of expressive forms.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17126 • Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding and AI I / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding and AI for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design and Photography / Hoahoa Whakanikoniko me te Whakaahuatanga

This course explores the basics of graphic design and photography through hands-on projects. Students are introduced to professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of visual works that express visual identity and voice.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30061 • Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 33344 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 153 – Fashion Systems and Ecologies / Pūnaha me te Hauropi ā-Kākahu

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Tue 1.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 171 – Design in a Global Context / Hoahoa i te Horopaki o te Ao Whānui

By observing and analysing historical approaches and responses in and between cultures and design, students will explore design from a place-based perspective.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17129 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Wed 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31178 • [Distance]

DSDN 172 – Whakapapa Design I

This course is deeply rooted in Māori culture. Whakapapa Design emphasises ethical behaviour and the consequences of our actions as designers. Whakapapa Design highlights interconnections between people, place, and all living entities and offers a path to restore the health and well-being of both people and the planet through narrative, making, language, and shared values. Whakapapa Design is guided by the Māori tikanga; whakawhanaungatanga and manaakitanga.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30062 • Mon 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

COMD 201 – Graphic Design / Hoahoa ā-Whakairoiro

In this course students will develop their understanding and facility with the elements and principles of graphic design. Areas include typography, colour, layout, heirarchy, balance and space. Students will look at the history of type and graphic design, and how this informs contemporary communication in print and screen. Students will become familiar with both historical and contemporary typographic and design styles and genres, and develop a critical eye for the complexities of graphic design.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the COMD major

1/3 • CRN 30072 • ^ Fri 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 211 – Drawing I / Tuhi Pikitia I

This course will allow students to practice traditional and contemporary approaches to both observational and imaginative drawing. In addition to building on skills and techniques developed in earlier courses, students will be encouraged to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 30073 • ^ Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 231 – Illustration / Pikitia Whakaari

In this course students will learn to illustrate and use illustration thoughtfully and effectively in a range of media. Historical and contemporary approaches will be studied from various perspectives: aesthetic, social, and commercial. Students will develop and complete illustration project briefs using a range of digital and physical tools and techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 45 pts from the BDI or BAS Schedules

2/3 • CRN 30074 • ^ Thu 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 241 – Visual Narratives / Ngā Paki Ataata

This course focuses on the structure and methods of effective storytelling, as expressed visually. Readings provide a broad survey of stories that employ visual narratives in innovative or instructive ways. Techniques are drawn from comics, books, graphic novels, film, children's books, and animation.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 45 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 33125 • ^ Tue 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 251 – Information Design / Hoahoa ā-Pārongo

This course addresses the demand for well-designed visual presentation of data in the information age. The course is interdisciplinary, combining skills from graphic design, interaction design, and data science. Students practice information design skills with applications beyond the traditional design professions. Students will shape data-driven messages in order to make knowledge accessible visually.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

COMD 261 – Motion Design I / Hoahoa ā-Nekehanga I

This course introduces basic concepts of motion design and time-based media in communication and graphic environments. Topics covered include introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery, graphic animation, as well as creative strategies and workflow. Students will apply concepts from motion design to time-based projects and outputs.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI schedule

2/3 • CRN 32098 • ^ Mon 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

Not offered in 2024

COMD 302 – Typography / Tātai Momotuhi

Students will hone and refine their critical eye for typography and delve into the anatomy, materiality, and complexities of type. There will be an intensive study of typographic hierarchies and expressive typography through practical exercises. Projects will introduce opportunities to work within constraints while challenging traditional typographic precedents.

15 pts • (P) P 60 200-level pts including COMD 201 (X) COMD 201 prior to 2023

1/3 • CRN 32099 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 325 – Print Media Now: Design for Publications / Arapāho Mātātuhi o Nāianei: Hoahoa mō ngā Whakaputanga

This course introduces students to specialist print design skills and knowledge. Print will be explored in many contexts, from hot metal and letterpress processes through the University’s own letterpress workshop, through to contemporary in-studio processes, such as silkscreen printing and risograph printing. There will be a particular emphasis on the craft of book design, taking a broad view of what defines a book – from simple zine-making through to more complex artefacts.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

Not offered in 2024

COMD 331 – Concept Art and World Building / Toi Ariā me te Waihanga ā-Ao

In this course students will use a variety of techniques to craft concepts and visual images that convey speculative or fictional worlds. Contemporary and historical approaches to concept art will be critically analysed. World building across media (illustration, graphic novels, film, animation, books, and games) will be explored through examples and exercises.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM/THEA/WRIT courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

COMD 335 – Comics and Graphic Novels / Pukawaituhi me ngā Pakimaero Waituhi

This course examines formal aspects of comics and graphic novels, their historical development, visual and culturally diverse vocabularies, and narrative applications. Readings provide examples of graphic storytelling and critique theoretical and practical approaches to the form. Students will develop and complete their own comics.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 45 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or ENGL, FILM, THEA, WRIT, LCCM courses

2/3 • CRN 32104 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 342 – Generative Graphic Design / Hoahoa Waihanga Whakairoiro

Students will use a design process, set of instructions, or computer programme, to generate a solution that blends design artistry with artificially generated output. This blend of traditional and emerging techniques will produce surprising outcomes. Students will create and analyse generative works. The purpose of the course is to explore how generative techniques can add to a design practice.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 142 and 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses

2/3 • CRN 30080 • Wed 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

COMD 351 – Writing for Design / Tuhituhi mō te Hoahoa

Students taking this course will develop a command of writing styles for use in creative practice. Projects will delve into self-reflective and exploratory writing about design, as well as critical interpretation. The course will also cover writing techniques that serve creative practice, such as client briefs, feedback and reports.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI schedule or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

COMD 390 – Communication Design Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Kōrero Hoahoa

In this course students produce a final work to demonstrate the skills and knowledge gained in Communication Design. Students complete a large studio-based project or portfolio demonstrating design mastery. In seminar-style discussions, students develop their own briefs or portfolio goals that address advanced problems or questions in communication design. Projects are published, and engagement with a community beyond the school is a goal of the work in this course.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371, COMD 201 (X) COMD 301

2/3 • CRN 32105 • ^ Mon 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Computer Graphics

CGRA 151 – Introduction to Computer Graphics and Games

Introduces necessary background, fundamental concepts, and basic algorithms of Computer Graphics, including human visual perception, representation of colour and images, representation of 2D and 3D spaces, manipulation, movement and drawing of 2D and 3D objects. Students will use an appropriate modern programming language to investigate many of the ideas presented in the lectured material.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112 or DSDN 142

2/3 • CRN 28221 • Mon, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

MATH 151 – Algebra

Linear algebra is central to mathematics, and essential in science and engineering. This course introduces linear algebra, motivated by some of these applications, and maintaining a practical approach using fundamental mathematical objects such as matrices and vectors. Methods to solve systems of linear equations using matrices are introduced, as are eigenvectors, which can be used to characterise matrices amongst many other applications. The concept of an algebraic structure is introduced, as are complex numbers, which allow the solution of many equations that did not previously have solutions.

15 pts • (P) 16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132

1/3 • CRN 17161 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

MATH 161 – Discrete Mathematics and Logic

Logic underlies all of mathematics. This course introduces the basic notions of logic and discusses what makes some arguments good or valid, and others invalid. This leads to a definition of a mathematical proof, whereby the truth of mathematical statements is guaranteed. Other topics include sets, relations, functions, elementary counting principles, and an introduction to number theory. The second half of the course introduces the fundamental concepts of graph theory, which is the study of networks, which have applications from computing to disease transmission.

15 pts • (P) 16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132

2/3 • CRN 17162 • Mon, Tue, Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CGRA 252 – Game Engine Programming

This course introduces students to a range of and graphics engines and teaches students how to use the variety of tools in these engines to build games and graphics output. Students will evaluate the engines as implementations of graphics pipelines and game development systems. Students will learn how to program extensions to games and graphics engines and how to use graphics APIs such as OpenGL in their programming.

15 pts • (P) CGRA 151, COMP 103

2/3 • CRN 35033 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CGRA 259 – Game Prototyping – Programming

This course uses game jams and hackathons as a learning environment where students work with commercial developers to learn how to develop new and innovative game prototypes. Students from the Graphics and Games major will be collaborating with students from the School of Design Innovation.

15 pts • (P) CGRA 151, COMP 103 (X) GAME 203 taken concurrently;

1+2+3/3 • CRN 35034 • [Kelburn]

CGRA 350 – Real-time 3D Computer Graphics

This course addresses graphics programming for real-time 3D graphics. It covers graphics APIs, in particular OpenGL, and the graphics processing pipeline (including geometry processing, viewing, projection, transformation, illumination, texture mapping). It also addresses display hardware and graphics cards.

15 pts • (P) CGRA 252 (or 251), NWEN 241

2/3 • CRN 28400 • Tue, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CGRA 352 – Image-based Graphics

Image-based graphics brings together the power visual media content to produce vivid, compelling, and meaningful computer graphics. This course studies ways of manipulating and combining images and videos, including image filtering, image manipulation, and video processing.

15 pts • (P) CGRA 252 (or 251); NWEN 241; ENGR 121 or MATH 151

1/3 • CRN 30096 • Mon, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

CGRA 354 – Computer Graphics Programming

This course addresses algorithms, mathematical knowledge and programming tools for 3D Computer Graphics, including offline rendering. It covers programming with Modern low-level graphics APIs, shader programming and the graphics processing pipeline (including geometry processing, viewing, projection, transformation, illumination, texture mapping and shading algorithms).

15 pts • (P) CGRA 252, NWEN 241; ENGR 121 or MATH 151 (X) CGRA 251

1/3 • CRN 36029 • Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

CGRA 359 – Games and Graphics Project

This course is a capstone for the Computer Graphics and Games major in which students learn to work in a multidisciplinary team to develop a game or graphics system up to release quality. The course will be taught in conjunction with GAME 390, and most teams will have students from both courses. The course brings together practical development and theoretical analysis to ensure students know both how to make games and how to assess them.

30 pts • (P) CGRA 252, 15 300-level CGRA pts (X) COMP 313; GAME 390 taken concurrently

2/3 • CRN 36030 • Mon, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn]

MDDN 342 – Creative Coding and AI III / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga III

Creative Coding III builds on the content taught in Creative Coding I and II and extends the use of procedural and parameterised design strategies and AI tools. Students will be taught advanced computer graphics and data mapping techniques in order to create dynamic visuals and assets for use in screen-based media. AI tools use and prompt engineering will also be deployed to advance code design workflows.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including MDDN 242

1/3 • CRN 28190 • ^ Tue 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Computer Science

See also Software Engineering and Network Engineering, and (for postgraduate level) Logic and Computation

AIML 131 – Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Enter the dynamic world of Artificial Intelligence with AIML 131. Delve deep into Large Language Models, such as ChatGPT, addressing challenges like bias and hallucinations. Witness the power of text-to-image generation through tools like Midjourney. Grasp the foundational principles of Machine Learning and get acquainted with Explainable AI. Discover how AI is making waves in Aotearoa, touching on ethics and real-world applications. No programming experience? No worries! AIML 131 is designed for everyone. You will gain a good understanding of AI principles and its transformative impact so that you can use AI to improve lives, whatever your area of work.

15 pts • (X) COMP 307, COMP 309

2/3 • CRN 35047 • Mon, Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CGRA 151 – Introduction to Computer Graphics and Games

Introduces necessary background, fundamental concepts, and basic algorithms of Computer Graphics, including human visual perception, representation of colour and images, representation of 2D and 3D spaces, manipulation, movement and drawing of 2D and 3D objects. Students will use an appropriate modern programming language to investigate many of the ideas presented in the lectured material.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112 or DSDN 142

2/3 • CRN 28221 • Mon, Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

COMP 102 – Introduction to Computer Program Design

Today, most problems are solved using computers. An understanding of programming is needed to harness the full potential of computers. This course serves as an introduction to the foundational principles of programming utilising the high-level object-oriented programming language Java. You will progressively enhance your programming abilities through the creation of computer programs tailored for various applications. This course establishes the fundamental groundwork for all subsequent computer science and software engineering courses, fostering the development of programming skills applicable to a wide range of academic disciplines.

15 pts • (X) COMP 112

1/3 • CRN 943 • Mon, Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 28225 • Mon, Wed, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Mon, Wed, Fri 3.30-4.30pm [Kelburn], [Kelburn]

COMP 103 – Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms

This course focuses on the techniques for designing, building and analysing computer programs that deal with large collections of data. The course addresses techniques for programming with collections of data, and the data structures and algorithms needed to implement these collections. The course expands programming skills and provides an understanding of the principles of data abstraction, algorithm design, and the analysis of algorithms fundamental to computer science.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112

2/3 • CRN 945 • Mon, Wed 5-6pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 7223 • [Kelburn]

lab tba

COMP 112 – Introduction to Computer Science

This course introduces a range of important concepts and topics across Computer Science, Software Engineering and Network Engineering. Students will also gain a solid foundation of programming skills in object oriented programming. The course is an entry point to the BE(Hons) and BSc in Computer Science for students who already have basic programming skills.

15 pts • (P) 14 NCEA Level 3 Achievement Standard credits in Digital Technology including 6 credits in Computer Programming, or COMP 132, or equivalent programming experience; (X) COMP 102

Not offered in 2024

COMP 132 – Programming for the Natural and Social Sciences

This course addresses the fundamental programming skills required to process, transform, analyse and present data. The course will explore a range of kinds of data, kinds of analysis and kinds of visualisation that can be performed on the data, and give students expertise in a variety of programming techniques and tools to accomplish this analysis and visualisation. The practical assignments will enable students to develop programming skills that they will be able to apply in many different fields of study. The course does not assume any background in programming.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30095 • Tue, Thu, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 171 – Cybersecurity Fundamentals

Hacker—hero or villain? Explore the world of cyber criminals, state-sponsored hackers, and commercial and government defenders. Engage directly with cybersecurity professionals as you explore diverse career paths — from incident response to digital forensics. This foundational course introduces you to social engineering, security and privacy concerns, physical security, common threats, attacks, and the techniques, frameworks, and tools used to defend and protect against them. You will leave the course equipped with essential skills to be a proactive guardian of your security without needing to be a programmer.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30039 • (L1) Mon, Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 36104 • (L2) Mon, Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 121 – Engineering Mathematics Foundations

An introduction to the range of mathematical techniques employed by engineers, including functions, calculus, linear algebra, vector geometry, set theory, logic and probability. This course emphasises engineering applications and modelling.

15 pts • (P) (16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132 (X) Any pair (MATH 141/QUAN 111, MATH 151/161/177)

1/3 • CRN 26052 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 31158 • Mon, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 122 – Engineering Mathematics with Calculus

Further mathematical techniques employed by electrical and electronic engineers, with a focus on methods of calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. There is an emphasis on engineering applications and use of software.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 or MATH 141; (X) the pair (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 26053 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 123 – Engineering Mathematics with Logic and Statistics

Mathematical techniques employed by cybersecurity and software engineers, including combinatorics, logic, probability distributions, model fitting and estimation. The course emphasises engineering applications.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121; (X) the pair MATH 161, (MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 27044 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31159 • Tue, Wed, Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

AIML 231 – Techniques in Machine Learning

This course introduces core concepts and techniques in machine learning, as well as commonly used software libraries for implementing machine learning pipelines. It includes an overview of the machine learning field, including supervised and unsupervised learning; fundamental machine learning techniques including neural networks; tools to understand data such as exploratory data analysis, pre-processing, and visualisation; and the design machine learning pipelines. This course balances theoretical concepts of machine learning and the use of programming libraries for hands-on practice.

15 pts • (P) AIML 131 or 60 200-level points or at least a B in DATA 101; one of (COMP 103, 132) (X) COMP 307, 309, DATA 302

1/3 • CRN 35049 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

AIML 232 – Techniques in Artificial Intelligence

This course introduces various concepts and techniques of broad applicability to artificial intelligence and machine learning. It includes an introduction to common machine learning paradigms such as neural networks and evolutionary learning; gradient-based and gradient-free optimisation techniques; dimensionality reduction; reasoning under uncertainty including Bayesian networks; and an introduction to AI planning. The course covers how these concepts can be used to solve important AI/ML tasks such as classification, regression, clustering and sequential decision making.

15 pts • (P) AIML 231, COMP 103, one of (ENGR 123, MATH 177, STAT 193, QUAN 102, EEEN 220) (X) COMP 307

2/3 • CRN 35050 • Wed, Thu, Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

COMP 261 – Algorithms and Data Structures

This course covers a range of algorithms and data structures building on the fundamental structures and algorithms from COMP 103. The major areas covered are: graph algorithms, graphics algorithms and advanced data structures. This course takes a practical approach focusing on the implementation of a wide variety of algorithms.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103, ENGR 123 or MATH 161 (X) INFO 205

1/3 • CRN 18314 • Mon, Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 271 – Code Security

This course covers measures taken to protect software code and applications from unauthorized access, modification, or exploitation. It involves identifying and addressing potential security vulnerabilities in the source code, design, and architecture of software applications.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, NWEN 241

2/3 • CRN 30040 • Tue, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 201 – Mechatronic Design and Prototyping

This course will equip students with a basic understanding of mechanical theory and the skills of electronic and mechanical design and construction so that they can successfully design and complete a moderately complex project. A presentation of this project work forms an integral part of the course.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112; ENGR 101, 110; ENGR 121 or MATH 141 or equivalent; (X) ECEN 201

2/3 • CRN 33053 • Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 202 – Digital Electronics and Microprocessors

An introduction to the design and construction of digital electronic instruments. Following a review of binary arithmetic and Boolean algebra, the course will focus on the design of digital circuits using both combinatorial and sequential logic. Further work will study microprocessor architectures, programming and interfacing and the conversions of digital and analogue signals.

15 pts • (P) one of (COMP 102, 112, ENGR 101, 121, MATH 161) (X) ECEN 202

1/3 • CRN 33054 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 203 – Circuit Analysis

This course covers the analysis of analogue electrical and electronic circuits. Topics covered include basic circuit theorems, operational amplifier circuits, the use of phasors for AC circuit analysis and the Laplace transform for switched systems. The use of computational and measurement tools for circuit characterisation is also covered.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 122 or MATH 142); (ENGR 142 or PHYS 142 or 115); (X) ECEN 203

1/3 • CRN 33055 • Tue, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

EEEN 204 – Electronic Devices

This course introduces fundamental electronic devices and their circuit applications. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals, diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers and the operation and application of special function diodes such as light emitting diodes and solar cells. Prototyping and testing of practical circuits using these electronic devices will be addressed in the laboratory sessions.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 122 or MATH 142); (ENGR 142 or PHYS 142 or 115); (X) ECEN 204

2/3 • CRN 33056 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EEEN 220 – Signals, Systems and Statistics 1

The course introduces analysis techniques for signals and linear time-invariant systems as well as fundamentals of engineering statistics. The first part of the course focuses on continuous time signals and systems and Fourier transform techniques, with applications to circuit analysis and communication systems. The second part of the course introduces probability mass and density functions, random variables and functions of random variables.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121,122) or (MATH 142, 151); (X) ECEN 220

2/3 • CRN 33057 • Mon, Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 241 – Systems Programming

This course considers the issues raised when programming at a low-level, for example in embedded systems, OS system level, or network protocol stacks. It includes an introduction to C language programming and motivating examples related to a wide variety of applications of system programming.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18315 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

NWEN 243 – Clouds and Networking

The course provides a broad introduction to computer networks and a basic understanding of network application programming, with an emphasis on the working principles and application of computer networks. It covers a range of introductory topics including the essentials of data communication, computer network concepts, protocols, network applications and cloud computing. The course features an interactive laboratory component with projects starting from basic networking technologies leading into cloud application development.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

2/3 • CRN 19863 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SWEN 221 – Software Development

This course develops a deeper understanding of object- oriented programming and associated practices. The focus is on programming techniques at the micro scale. Topics include: inheritance, polymorphism, genericity, error handling, testing and debugging. A sequence of short assignments will develop the key ideas and practices; rigour in testing will be developed through (automated) assessment of programme correctness.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18318 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 225 – Software Design

This course develops a strong understanding of object-oriented design. Students will study modelling and programming techniques that support the analysis, design and development of large and maintainable programs. Students will work together in groups on an engineering problem and use a variety of best practices (e.g. Design Patterns) and notations (e.g. UML). Students will use specialized tools to apply these techniques in practical work.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 221; (X) SWEN 222

2/3 • CRN 30043 • Tue, Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

COMP 304 – Programming Languages

This course addresses the principles of programming language design and use. It introduces different models of computation and the programming languages based on them, particularly functional programming and logic programming. It then examines a range of underlying issues in programming languages, such as semantics of programming languages, type systems, and control in programming languages.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261

Not offered in 2024

COMP 307 – Fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence

This course addresses key ideas and techniques of artificial intelligence (AI). It provides a brief introduction to the history of AI and fundamental search techniques, as well as introducing important machine learning topics and algorithms with their applications, including neural networks, and addresses a selection of other important topics in AI.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221 or at least a B in both DATA 201 and DATA 202; one of (ENGR 123, MATH 151, MATH 161, MATH 277, QUAN 203, STAT 292) (X) COMP 420, AIML 420, AIML 232, AIML 131

1/3 • CRN 968 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

COMP 309 – Machine Learning Tools and Techniques

This course explores a range of machine learning tools and techniques for analysing data and automatically generating applications. The course will address tools for classification, regression, clustering and text mining, and techniques for preprocessing data and analysing the results of machine learning tools. Students will gain practical experience in applying a range of tools to a range of different data sets from different domains.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or (DATA 201 and DATA 202) or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221 (X) AIML 421, AIML 231, AIML 131

2/3 • CRN 30098 • Mon, Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

COMP 312 – Simulation and Stochastic Models

Simulation and modelling of stochastic systems, covering examples from Operations Research and Computer Science, including queues, networks and computer systems. Design, analysis and validation of simulation experiments. Previous experience with computer programming is required before starting this course. Co-taught with DATA 304.

15 pts • (P) one course from (COMP 102, 112, 132, DATA 202); one course from (ENGR 123, MATH 177, 277, STAT 292), 15 further 200-level COMP, DATA, MATH, NWEN, STAT or SWEN pts; (D) DATA 304

Not offered in 2024

COMP 361 – Design and Analysis of Algorithms

This course examines techniques for developing correct and efficient algorithms for some important classes of problems in Computer Science. It explores methods for designing algorithms, including greedy algorithms, divide and conquer, dynamic programming and graph algorithms. It covers techniques for demonstrating the correctness of algorithms and for analysing their efficiency.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261

Not offered in 2024

CYBR 371 – System and Network Security

This course covers system and network security, emphasizing secure design, access control, and TCP/IP protocol security. Students will gain practical skills in Linux ACLs, shell scripting, and the deployment of defence mechanisms, preparing them for modern cybersecurity challenges.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, NWEN 243

1/3 • CRN 32072 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 372 – Applied Cryptography

This course covers key cryptography concepts and services, encryption, hash functions, digital signatures, public key certificates, cryptographic protocols, and applications like SSL/TLS and blockchain.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171; COMP 261 or SWEN 221

2/3 • CRN 32078 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 373 – Governance, Risk and Compliance

This course offers a detailed exploration of risk management in cybersecurity, covering concepts from basic principles to advanced applications. It includes practical exercises on security controls, incident response, and policy development, alongside in-depth discussions on security governance, ethics, legal environments, and cloud security. We also cover cultural considerations, as well as Māori Data Sovereignty principles.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, 60 200-level pts from (AIML, COMP, CYBR, SWEN)

2/3 • CRN 32079 • Tue, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

DATA 302 – Machine Learning Techniques for Data Science

This course introduces a range of machine learning techniques of importance in Data Science, and gives students experience in using modern software libraries for implementing machine learning pipelines. Topics will include machine learning techniques for both supervised and unsupervised learning, including neural networks, and the design of machine learning pipelines.

15 pts • (P) DATA 201, DATA 202 (X) AIML 231, COMP 309

1/3 • CRN 36069 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 301 – Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems

The course develops an understanding of the structure of computers, how they execute programs and how they interface to the real world. The course first covers ARM assembly language programming, data representation, computer arithmetic, microprocessor architecture at the hardware level and a comparison with GPU, DSP and FPGA architectures. The course then explores the design flow and application of embedded computers in real-world engineering problems. Practical experience is gained using microprocessors, techniques to interface them with the physical world, development tool chains, debugging and embedded Linux operating systems.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 202 (or ECEN 202), NWEN 241 (X) ECEN 301, NWEN 342

1/3 • CRN 34002 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 310 – Communication Engineering

The course provides students with an introduction to the physical layer of communication systems. It begins with basics of analog communications (AM, FM). Digital communications topics include intersymbol interference and Nyquist pulse shaping for bandlimited channels, matched filter receivers for additive noise channels and their error rate performance. Also covered are fundamentals of wireless fading channels and diversity receivers, followed by a brief overview of equalisation and OFDM.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 220 (or ECEN 220); (X) ECEN 310

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 313 – Power Electronics and Electrical Machines

This course covers the theory, design and application of electrical machines, power electronic circuits, electric drives, and the transformation and control of electrical energy. The course introduces the fundamentals of electromagnetics and electrical machines, as well as power electronics and discusses the design issues related to electrical drives and small-scale power generation. Practical work will involve the design, development, and implementation of solutions to drive motors, convert renewable power, and switch mode power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203 (or ECEN 203), EEEN 204 (or ECEN 204)

2/3 • CRN 33058 • Mon, Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 315 – Control and Instrumentation

The course shows how models can be used to analyse, describe and predict the behaviour of mechanical and electrical systems. The use of feedback to alter the properties of these systems to meet desired specifications is presented. A variety of methods are developed for designing control systems, including the use of a PID controller.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203 (or ECEN 203) (X) ECEN 315

1/3 • CRN 34004 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EEEN 320 – Signals, Systems and Statistics 2

The course introduces analysis techniques for discrete-time signals and linear time-invariant systems as well as topics in engineering statistics. The first part of the course focuses on discrete-time signals and systems and discrete Fourier transform techniques, with applications to circuit analysis and communication systems. The second part of the course covers topics in engineering statistics, including confidence intervals, statistical tests, and regression, as applied to engineering problems.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 220 (or ECEN 220) (X) ECEN 321

2/3 • CRN 34005 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

EEEN 325 – Robotic Engineering

This course presents the principles of robotic and mechatronic design, construction and control. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of integrating mechanical, electronic and software components.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 201 (X) ECEN 301

2/3 • CRN 34006 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

NWEN 301 – Operating Systems Design

This course addresses the design and implementation of operating sytems and examines fundamental concepts such as resource management, concurrency, protection and security. Examples drawn from a range of modern operating systems illustrate these concepts and project work provides practical experience in the design and implementation of operating systems.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 302 – Computer Network Design

This course addresses the principles, architectures and protocols that have shaped the development of the Internet and modern networked applications. It examines network design principles, underlying protocols, technologies and architectures of the TCP/IP protocol stack. Topics include the design of transport protocols, routing protocols, logical link control, medium access control and physical media.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 243; ENGR 123 or (MATH 161 and one of (MATH 177 or QUAN 102 or STAT 193))

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 303 – Concurrent Programming

This course examines a range of techniques for programming multi-threaded and distributed applications. Topics include synchronisation mechanisms used for programs that communicate via shared memory and message passing techniques for programs that communicate across a network. Practical work involves implementing programs using these techniques in a modern concurrent language, such as Java.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 123 or MATH 161; SWEN 221; 15 points from (COMP 261, CYBR 271, NWEN 241, 243)

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 304 – Advanced Network Applications

This course introduces technologies, algorithms and systems for developing secure, scalable and reliable web server applications. Specific emphasis will be placed on application development middleware, computer security, network protocols and distributed systems. Particularly a variety of topics ranging from fundamental to advanced technologies for developing RESTful web applications, including MVC, distributed authentication and authorization, secure data communication, web caching and content replication, will be covered in lectures.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 123 or MATH 161, NWEN 243; COMP 261 or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 301 – Scalable Software Development

This course introduces the processes, practices, and tools required to engineer medium to large software systems, and to address challenges arising from the emerging complexity of such systems. Topics include software craft, architecture, design, implementation, testing, maintenance, quality assurance, configuration management, build automation and principled use of components and libraries, and open-source development. Practical work will use integrated development environments, automation, and domain specific languages.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 225

2/3 • CRN 17183 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 303 – User Experience Engineering

This course addresses the engineering of user experiences (UX). It presents principles and guidelines for design and covers a range of design and engineering processes. It presents techniques for user testing of applications, digital systems, and physical devices.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 221 (X) INFO 307

1/3 • CRN 17185 • Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 304 – Database System Engineering

The course addresses fundamental principles underlying databases and database management systems. It covers the structure and principles of the relational data model, including SQL, and the principled design of the relational database schema. It also addresses issues in database transaction procession, concurrency control, recovery, and the complexity of query processing.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 221; ENGR 123 or MATH 161 (X) COMP 302, INFO 310

1/3 • CRN 17186 • Mon, Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SWEN 324 – Software Correctness

This course is concerned with the development of correct software, especially the use of formal requirements and specifications to develop high-integrity software. This has applications in several areas, such as safety-critical systems (e.g. commercial airliners, space systems, etc.) and high-performance concurrent systems. The course will examine a range of principles and techniques which underpin a rigorous approach to the specification and implementation of software. A sequence of assignments and labs will see a range of tools being used to specify small software systems, and to check that they meet their requirements.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103; ENGR 123 or MATH 161; 30 200-level COMP/NWEN/SWEN points; (X) SWEN 224

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 325 – Software Development for Mobile Platforms

This course addresses the concepts, techniques, and tools required for developing applications within software frameworks for mobile platforms. Topics include the concepts and principles underlying software frameworks, the design and implementation of client-server applications, principles of user experience design for frameworks, the design and implementation of client-server applications, principles of user experience design for mobile applications, and key concepts in reliability, privacy, security and safety critical systems. Practical work will involve the design, implementation and testing of a range of mobile applications.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 243, SWEN 225 (or 222)

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 326 – Safety-Critical Systems

This course addresses the concepts, techniques and tools required for developing computer systems that are applicable where safety and reliability is paramount. Topics include: the concepts and principles underlying safety-critical systems & standards (e.g. DO178C and IEC61508); techniques for design validation (e.g. model checking); and implementation techniques for ensuring software correctness (e.g. coding guidelines, testing, static analysis, etc). Practical work will involve the design, implementation, and analysis of simple safety critical applications (e.g. for industrial, embedded and healthcare systems).

15 pts • (P) (NWEN 241 or SWEN 225), 15 further 200-level AIML, CGRA, COMP, CYBR, EEEN, NWEN, SWEN pts

1/3 • CRN 30042 • Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

COMP 420 – Artificial Intelligence

This course addresses concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence (AI). It provides a brief overview of AI history and search techniques, as well as covering important machine learning topics and algorithms with their applications, including neural networks and evolutionary algorithms. Other topics include probability and Bayesian networks, planning and scheduling. The course will also consider a selection of other current topics in AI (Being offered as AIML 420 from 2021).

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level COMP, SWEN or NWEN pts; (X) COMP 307

Not offered in 2024

COMP 440 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 15202 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27190 [Kelburn]

COMP 441 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 15203 [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 23169 [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 29145 [Kelburn]

EEEN 401 – Applied Electromagnetics and Compliance

This course will address the engineering applications of electromagnetism, including propagation of signals, low EM emissions circuit board design, radio waves and antennas, grounding, high voltage insulators, and electrical safety design and testing. An important focus of the course is to become familiar with the international framework of product compliance and sustainability.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 313, one of (ENGR 222, MATH 244)

2/3 • CRN 34003 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 402 – Programmable Digital Logic

The course develops an understanding of the structure of Field Programmable Gate Arrays, how to program them and how to interface them to the real world. The topics covered are VHDL programming, logic design, state machine design, I/O, design tools, simulation, timing analysis, debugging, IP block design methodology, softcore microprocessors and system on a chip implementation. Practical experience is gained through the use of professional design tools and hardware to interface FPGAs with the physical world.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 301 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 302

2/3 • CRN 34014 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 403 – Advanced Electronic Instrumentation

This course develops a deeper understanding of electronic instrumentation and the underlying models and methodologies used in electronic design. Topics covered are: derivation of discrete device models (including noise behaviour) for simulation, radio frequency design and simulation, two port networks, power transfer and impedance matching, transmission lines, high speed PCB design, noise, discrete device and Op Amp low noise amplifier design and Phase Locked Loop modelling and implementation. Practical skills are developed through laboratory simulation and design exercises.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 315 (or ECEN 303) (X) ECEN 403

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 410 – Advanced Communications Engineering

The course covers advanced topics in physical layer wireless communications. It begins with a brief introduction to Information Theory, leading to the concept of channel capacity. Multiple antenna techniques for both single and multiple user communications are discussed, including diversity, space time coding and digital beamforming. Large scale systems and advanced channel models are discussed. Matlab system simulations are used throughout the course for evaluating the communication system performance.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 310 (or ECEN 310) (X) ECEN 410

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 411 – Coding and Cryptography for Communications

The course covers key topics in modern coding theory (finite vector spaces, linear codes, coding bounds, perfect codes, cyclic codes) as applied to wireless communication systems. Further topics include cryptography (classical ciphers, the one-time pad, Shannon's Theorem, linear shift registers, public key cryptography, one-way functions, the RSA cryptosystem, key distribution and digital signatures).

15 pts • (P) EEEN 310 (or ECEN 310) (X) MATH 324

2/3 • CRN 34022 • tba [Kelburn]

EEEN 415 – Advanced Control Systems Engineering

This course extends previous control studies to cover the use of modern control techniques in shaping the behaviour of complex systems having multiple inputs and outputs, in both discrete and continuous time. Optimal control (LQR) and estimation (the Kalman filter) are introduced. The course concentrates on linear and linearised systems, but some introductory nonlinear material is presented, including applications to robot control.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 315 (or ECEN 315) (X) ECEN 415

2/3 • CRN 34029 • Mon, Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 421 – Advanced Signal Processing

This course provides a geometric intuition to signal processing. This geometric point of view is a powerful tool for the understanding of signal processing techniques including transforms, sampling, time-frequency analysis and wavelets. The course provides the mathematical depth and rigor that is necessary for the study of more advanced topics in signal processing, including stochastic processes and estimation.

15 pts • (P) one of (ECEN 321, EEEN 320, MATH 318, MATH 377, STAT 332) (X) ECEN 421

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 422 – Convex Optimisation

Convex optimisation problems are common in science, engineering and economics. The course teaches identifying and solving convex optimisation problems. It discusses convex sets and functions, linear and quadratic programs, semi-definite programming, and duality theory. It uses these concepts to solve practical optimisation problems .

15 pts • (P) EEEN 320 (or ECEN 320 or 321) (X) ECEN 422, ECEN 426 in 2014–2016

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 425 – Advanced Robotic Engineering

This course presents advanced principles of robotic and mechatronic design, prototyping, construction and control. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of integrating the mechanical, electronic and software components and applies relevant machine learning concepts.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 325 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 425

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 427 – Special Topic: Advanced Mechatronic Design

The course will cover a number of topics in design, simulation, construction and testing of advanced mechatronic systems, addressing both theoretical and practical design aspects.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 325 or EEEN 301

1/3 • CRN 34034 • Mon, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

EEEN 430 – Robotic Intelligence and Design

The course addresses the applications of artificially intelligent systems in embodied scenarios. It will teach the skills to assess tasks, evaluate appropriate techniques, and will provide experience in designing and implementing solutions and communicating the benefits of AI in physically based tasks.

15 pts • (P) one of (COMP 309, EEEN 325 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 430

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 431 – Musical Robotics

This project-based course incorporates a music theme in the design and construction of a novel mechatronic instrument. The necessary fundamentals of the appropriate music theory are introduced, and then students are guided in a project-based learning style to develop an actuator and sensor rich robotic device that can play a suitable music score. Students are evaluated on their design, construction and testing of this robotic device.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 325 or equivalent (X) ECEN 427 in 2017-2018

Not offered in 2024

Creative Writing

See also Writing (Academic and Professional)

FHSS 103 – Great Ideas

Great Ideas is a course reflecting on some of the most exciting, important and revolutionary ideas that have shaped society and culture as it is today. It also considers how those ideas have an ongoing influence. It’s an interdisciplinary course looking at topics across the humanities, arts and social sciences.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 29008 • [Taught Online]

3/3 • CRN 29011 • [Taught Online]

CREW 253 – Poetry Workshop - He Rotarota

A workshop course in writing poetry which also involves wide reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

2/3 • CRN 9493 • ^ Mon 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 254 – Short Fiction Workshop - He Kōrero Paki

A workshop course in writing short fiction which also involves wide reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9495 • ^ Mon 2-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 9496 • ^ Fri 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 255 – Writing for the Young- He Tuhinga mā ngā Tamariki

A workshop course in writing for children which also involves wide reading of children's literature.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

Not offered in 2024

CREW 257 – Creative Nonfiction Workshop- He Kōrero Pono

A workshop course in writing creative nonfiction (e.g. memoirs, travel writing) which also involves representative reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9499 • ^ Fri 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 258 – Iowa Prose Workshop - He Tuhinga nō Tāwāhi

A topic in creative writing. Course materials will be an additional cost.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts, and an appropriate standard in written composition.

3/3 • CRN 17403 • ^ Tue, Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 259 – Iowa Poetry Workshop - He Rotarota nō Tāwāhi

A topic in creative writing. Course materials will be an additional cost.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts, and an appropriate standard in written composition.

3/3 • CRN 17404 • ^ Tue, Thu 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 260 – Māori and Pasifika Creative Writing Workshop- Te Hiringa a Tuhi

This creative writing workshop is a practical paper for students who wish to produce fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry or scriptwriting which is informed by Māori or Pasifika perspectives, cultures and origins, the process of colonisation, or questions of identity and belonging. However, this is not a prescriptive list, and students are free to write creatively in ways that do not directly address these subjects. The writing workshop will form the heart of this course, with students also reading and discussing Māori, Pasifika and other writers of colour.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 200-level and approval of the Programme Director (X) CREW 256 (2014-2018)

2/3 • CRN 31060 • ^ Mon 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 351 – Writing for Television Workshop - He Tuhinga mō te Pouaka Whakaata

A workshop course in writing television drama - including sketch comedy, sitcom, soap and series drama.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9500 • ^ Thu 4-7pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 353 – Writing for Theatre Workshop - He Tuhinga Whakaari

A workshop in the art and craft of writing scripts for live performance.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts at 200-level and permission of Programme Director; (X) THEA 309

2/3 • CRN 26036 • ^ Fri 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 354 – Long-Form Fiction

This advanced creative writing workshop is a practical course for students who wish to produce long-form fiction (10,000+ word stories). Through the workshopping of each other’s fiction and the close reading of published literary texts, students will explore aspects of craft such as sustaining tension and integrating multiple storylines. This course is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts at 200-level and approval of the Programme Director

1/3 • CRN 32039 • ^ Mon 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 355 – World-Building Creative Writing Workshop

An advanced workshop for writers interested in long-form speculative fiction. Students will collaboratively develop a single story while working individually on the different components of successful world-building, including characterisation, structure, point-of-view, dialogue and pace.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts at 200-level and approval of the Programme Director (X) CREW 350 (2017-2020)

2/3 • CRN 33111 • ^ Wed 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Criminology

CRIM 111 – Introduction to Criminology

CRIM 111 is a broad-based introduction to key criminological concepts, debates and theories. The first half explores a wide range of theoretical explanations for crime/criminality. The second explores the attempts to measure crime, media representations of crime and the social dimensions or correlates of crime including ethnicity, class, gender and age.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS, or 15 PSYC points

2/3 • CRN 26079 • (L1) Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27182 • (L2) Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 202 – Crime in Aotearoa New Zealand

This course critically examines criminal offending in Aotearoa New Zealand. The course considers patterns of offending and victimization in relation to historical events, political ideologies and social relations, and highlights processes of criminalisation in the news media and on behalf of ‘moral entrepreneurs’. The course draws on case studies and guest speakers to illustrate key issues.

20 pts • (P) CRIM 111 (X) CRIM 212

1/3 • CRN 31047 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 203 – Criminal Justice in Aotearoa New Zealand

While providing an overview of the development and implementation of criminal justice, this course critically examines the significant social, political, economic and cultural contexts in which ‘justice’ is undertaken in Aotearoa New Zealand. The course explores how criminal justice measures are differentially experienced, and considers how justice could be done differently.

20 pts • (P) as for CRIM 202; (X) CRIM 212

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 204 – Current Issues in Criminology

The course will consider issues of current criminological concern, here in New Zealand and globally. Students will be encouraged to think about the full range of crimes and social harms associated with these issues. Human rights will be introduced as a way of thinking about harms perpetrated by the state. There will be a focus on applying theory and research. The course aims to develop students who know how to interpret and respond to real life events in ways that promote security and social justice.

20 pts • (P) CRIM 111; (X) CRIM 219 2017-2018

2/3 • CRN 31049 • Mon 1-3pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 210 – Beyond Crime: Understanding Social Harm

This course will introduce you to the concept of social harm, moving beyond the idea of 'crime' to consider a broad range of harms that occur throughout society. This is achieved through engagement with key theoretical literature that has laid the foundations for the social harm concept, and a series of case studies focused on a range of topics including borders, poverty, colonialism, gender, labour, sport, and the environment.

20 pts • (P) CRIM 111

1/3 • CRN 34086 • Tue 2-4pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 217 – Criminal Psychology

CRIM 217 provides an introduction to psychological approaches to understanding, investigating and preventing criminal behaviour. Topics covered include developmental patterns in offending, the psychology of wrongful convictions and criminal investigation, homicide (including mass and serial murder), and crimes against non-human animals and the environment.

20 pts • (P) CRIM 111

2/3 • CRN 25011 • Tue, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

CRIM 218 – Discrimination and Criminal Justice

Students will critically examine the nature and extent of discrimination experienced by particular groups in the criminal justice system with particular focus on indigenous people, minority ethnic groups, women and Muslims. Key concepts explored include: power; prejudice; discrimination, non-discrimination and anti-discrimination; social construction; othering; 'race'; labelling; prejudice and stereotyping. Please note this course is not offered for 2023.

20 pts • (P) CRIM 111

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 304 – Green Criminology

This course explores the harms experienced by people, non-human animals, and ecosystems resulting from human activity with the environment. Engaging with the concept of ecojustice and drawing on a range of perspectives from the field of green criminology, the course examines the nature of harm in relation to issues such as trophy hunting, climate refugees, and water security. Students will have the opportunity to conduct in-depth analysis for a case study of their choosing and to craft ecocritical responses to current regulatory problems.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from CRIM 200–299, GLBL 201; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC; (X) CRIM 303 in 2023

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 309 – Critical Issues in Restorative Justice

Restorative Justice has been deemed one of the most significant innovations in the administration of justice since the birth of the modern nation state. This course explores the origins, development, theory and practice of restorative approaches in criminal justice. Current debates and critical approaches, including perspectives from te ao Māori, on theory and practice will be explored.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from CRIM 200–299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC (X) CRIM 330 in 2020-2022

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 310 – Prisons in Aotearoa New Zealand

This course examines issues of state punishment and incarceration in Aotearoa New Zealand. A central focus is the record growth in the country’s prison population over the last four decades. These changes are viewed in relation to broader social issues of colonialism and post-colonialism, shifting public values and morality, and contemporary patterns of inequality. Alternatives to incarceration are evaluated and explored.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from CRIM 200–299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC; (X) CRIM 303 (2017-2019)

1/3 • CRN 33050 • Mon 9-11 [Kelburn]

CRIM 311 – Policing

A critical examination of policing in modern society. Topics will include the history of the police and policing, the evolution of policing methods and strategies, police culture and discretion, issues of gender and ethnicity, and police accountability.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC (X) LAWS 309

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 312 – Punishment and Modern Society

The historical development of modern punishment, with particular reference to New Zealand, and its relationship to broader social and political change.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 313 – Women, Crime and Social Control

The study of women's involvement and experiences within the criminal justice system and its social control implications. Topics include women as offenders, women as victims, and women as criminal justice professionals.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299 (or SACS 202); one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

2/3 • CRN 3091 • Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CRIM 314 – Special Topic: Delinquency, Ethnicity and Gangs

An exploration of the range of delinquency theories that account for the formation of gangs in societies. The course explores these traditions through a critical and Pacific criminological lens and identifies key themes that challenge the global north and western hold on the production of knowledge for this field. It argues for a wider theoretical framework for delinquency theorising and presents alternative crime and justice theorising through analyses of gang case studies. It also includes professional insights and experiences particularly from youth justice, social work, probation, and police points of view.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

1/3 • CRN 9345 • Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CRIM 315 – White-Collar Crime

This course will examine white-collar crime, using case study examples to look at well-known case studies of individual white-collar crimes, corporate crimes, and political crimes. Understanding these 'crimes of the powerful' is a key part of contemporary criminology. We will consider the main explanations of the causes of white-collar crimes, and discuss the merits of various methods of policing, regulating and punishing powerful offenders. The limits of criminology and the criminal law as policy tools for controlling elite deviance will be critically evaluated.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC; (X) CRIM 314 (2016-19)

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 316 – Criminological Theory

A study of various theories of crime causation and their implications for understanding criminal behaviour.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

2/3 • CRN 6016 • Mon 3-5pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CRIM 322 – Crime, Deviance and Popular Culture

This course examines the relationship between popular cultural, criminal, and deviant practices. In addition to studying examples of the criminalisation of cultural practices, students will focus on how far popular cultural representations of crime and deviance reflect the 'reality' of crime and deviance in contemporary society. Popular cultural representations of crime and deviance as a mirror reflecting societal attitudes and stereotypes of race, masculinity and femininity in relation to crime and deviance will be examined. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of research which has attempted to examine and explain the ways in which cultural, criminal and deviant practices may come together.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 323 – State Crime

This course examines theoretical, social, political, and legal perspectives on state crime. Through case-study material, state crime is shown to be diverse, destructive and, often, hidden. The course evaluates how state officials join with other actors to commit crimes, and analyses the range of response to these events.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 324 – Sexual Violence

This course is designed to introduce students to the issues and concepts central to an understanding of sexual violence. The focus of the course is on the study of adult rape/sexual assault and child sexual abuse. The course explores the causes, characteristics and consequences of sexual violence, examining issues for both the victims and offenders of these crimes. Topics covered may include theories of sexual offending, criminal justice system responses, victim impacts and survival, rape prevention, and offender treatment programmes.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299 (or SACS 202); one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 325 – Drugs, Risk and Play

This course will examine the place of drugs, both legal and illegal, in contemporary society through a critical exploration of the socially constructed boundaries between use and misuse. The course will also critically interrogate the use of drugs in a recreational setting, focusing on the socially constructed boundaries between recreational and 'problem' drug use, as well as the separation between licit and illicit use.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC; (X) CRIM 216

2/3 • CRN 25009 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 326 – Criminological Research Methods

CRIM 326 will provide an introduction to research methods in criminology. The course will present different approaches to studying crime and explore the important ethical issues in doing criminological research. Note: this course is strongly recommended for students wishing to progress to Honours level study.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 327 – Biosocial criminology

This course provides an introduction to the biosocial approach in criminology. The role of evolution, genetics and neurobiology in understanding criminal behaviour will be examined and implications for the criminal justice system will be explored. A key focus will be on how biological factors can be integrated with social and cultural factors to provide a more complete understanding of key findings in criminology. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the implications of a biosocial approach for crime prevention, offender rehabilitation, and criminal responsibility.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

Not offered in 2024

CRIM 328 – Terrorism and Political Violence

The course analyses terrorism and political violence, and challenges conventional distinctions between legitimate war and illegitimate political violence. The course explores the causes of terrorism and political violence by describing and evaluating current theories and research on terrorism and radicalisation. It examines and critiques military and non-military policy responses to terrorism and political violence. Students will develop a nuanced understanding of terrorism and political violence, as well as policy responses to these forms of violence, from a criminological perspective.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from CRIM 200–299; one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

1/3 • CRN 34074 • Thu 10-12 [Kelburn]

Cultural Anthropology

ANTH 101 – Foundations of Society and Culture

This course introduces students to the subject by focusing on how anthropologists understand and explain social and cultural differences. We will explore a range of contemporary topics through a set of key questions that form the foundation of the discipline and are essential to both further study in Anthropology and an appreciation of world cultures.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 266 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 102 – Social and Cultural Diversity

This course introduces students to the study of social and cultural diversity by exploring culture and its role in our lives. Topics include ritual, symbolism, the body, exchange, belief, inequality, globalisation, kinship, gender and class. Case studies are drawn from New Zealand, the Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 267 • Tue, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 201 – Gender, Sexuality and Kinship

This course examines anthropological approaches to kinship, sexuality and gender. It will explore the shifting social norms surrounding gender, sexuality, the family and relatedness across diverse cultural settings. It will reveal how practices of gender, sexuality and kinship intersect with new reproductive technologies, media, nationalism, capitalism, colonisation, class and race.

20 pts • (P) 20 ANTH pts or GLBL 101 or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 30010 • Fri 1-3pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 202 – Capitalism, Culture, and Inequality

This course introduces topics in economic anthropology by examining the various. forms that capitalism takes within different cultural contexts, how it produces inequalities, and the varied ways that people and cultures respond to, appropriate and resist the economic systems of today's global world.

20 pts • (P) (ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule) or GLBL 101 (X) ANTH 215 in 2019-2020, ANTH 315 in 2017- 2018

2/3 • CRN 34075 • Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 204 – Modern Anthropological Thought

This course explores inspiring and influential ideas in recent Anthropology by discussing the writings of some of the discipline's greatest thinkers. Among the topics considered are: symbolism and the interpretation of cultures; culture and globalisation; ethnography and morality; culture and history; culture and evolution; culture and power; culture and experience.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 208 – Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development

This course will examine the cultural encounters and human experiences that emerge out of contemporary human rights regimes, humanitarian interventions, development projects, and global politics. Taking case studies from a range of different cultural settings, it will focus on how culture and politics shapes these global practices, and how different groups understand, respond to and challenge these interventions.

20 pts • (P) (ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule) or GLBL 101

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 209 – Conflict and Reconciliation

This course focuses on anthropological approaches to conflict and reconciliation, exploring the relationship between the two, and considering how we as anthropologists approach these topics at local, national, and international levels. These themes are addressed through material that examines societies in conflict, post-conflict peace-building, nationalism, and state building. The course will also examine theories of social suffering and studies that explore local interpretations of history, politics, violence, and power. A variety of ethnographies will be considered.

20 pts • (P) (ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule) or GLBL 101

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 210 – Environmental Anthropology

This course explores human relationships with ecological and material environments. It will examine diverse cultural perceptions of and approaches to the environment, the relationship between nature and culture, and anthropology’s contribution to contemporary ecological and climate debates.

20 pts • (P) (ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule) or GLBL 101

1/3 • CRN 29065 • Tue 2-4pm [Kelburn]

ANTH 213 – Ritual and Collective Life

How do communities give meaning and order to the world? What binds us together in collective relations with one another? This course offers an introduction to the anthropology of ritual. It will consider the ways rituals give order to social life, how they are used as public performances, how they generate political power, and how they are used to challenge established modes of living and being. The course examines a range of examples from New Zealand and beyond.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 13073 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 215 – Special Topic: Anthropology, Education and Social Change

This course applies anthropological insights and theories to ideas about education in different historical and cultural contexts. We will examine core issues in the anthropology of education (such as gender, race and class) to ask how and where people learn, what education does in different societies, why education is often linked with social change, and what role education has in our own lives.

20 pts • (P) ANTH 101 or 102 or EDUC 223; 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 13112 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 301 – Science, Technology and Culture

Science and technology are fundamental parts of all cultures. In this course, we examine how diverse sciences and technologies shape peoples’ interpretations of the world, their relations with one another, and their understandings of themselves. Considering issues like the relationship between indigenous knowledges and science, robotics, social media, medicine and biotechnology, and climate and environment, we ask what science is, how technology functions, and what place science and technology have in our own lives and societies.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ANTH 314 in 2018-2019

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 302 – Anthropology for Liberation

This course explores how Anthropology might contribute to human emancipation from racism, gender inequality, class disparities, and other forms of oppression and exploitation. We will consider what it means to approach anthropology from a decolonising perspective and explore what an anthropology for liberation might look like in theory and practice, drawing on examples from Asia, Oceania, and Latin America.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299 or GLBL 201 (X) ANTH 215 in 2017, ANTH 315 in 2019-2021

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 307 – Medical Anthropology

This course explores what roles our cultural beliefs and practices play in shaping our understandings of health, wellbeing, illness and medicine. We ask how culture mediates our experiences of our bodies, our emotions and diseases, and how local and global inequalities affect health outcome. The course takes a comparative approach, asking students to consider cultural approaches to disease categories, illness experiences, and systems of healing in their own societies and communities as well as in a range of globally diverse settings.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299 or GLBL 201

1/3 • CRN 27015 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ANTH 308 – Anthropology in Oceania

This course offers an in-depth exploration of the cultural diversity in Oceania by analysing the complex interplay between colonial encounters, postcolonial impacts, Indigenous epistemologies, and identity formation. We will explore these themes through the lens of the ocean, which has historically shaped connections, migration, trade, and cultural exchange within the region. Through a combination of theoretical discussions, case studies, ethnographic readings, and multimedia materials, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of how various colonial histories have influenced indigenous societies and and their ways of knowing, being, and relating.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200-299

2/3 • CRN 276 • Tue 10-12 [Kelburn]

seminar tba

ANTH 312 – Creative Ethnographic Practices

In this course we will explore some of the methodologies anthropologists use to collect and analyse data (including participant-observation, interviews, collaboration, visual ethnography, and auto-ethnography), and consider ethical and political issues in ethnographic research. We will also guide you through the process of crafting your own research project – with an opportunity to do ethnographic fieldwork – discussing questions of ethics, beneficence, positionality, research relationships, representation, knowledge production, and how to analyse and present findings in a variety of creative styles and genres. This course seeks to equip you with a strong foundation in ethnographic research skills to take into future employment or postgraduate study.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

2/3 • CRN 280 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ANTH 314 – Special Topic: Anthropology of Food and Eating

This course examines anthropological approaches to the role of food and eating in human life. It explores how food reflects social relations, expresses power structures, shapes cultural practices, and enacts systems of meaning.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 6102 • Tue 2-4pm [Kelburn]

seminar tba

ANTH 316 – Visual Anthropology

This course will consider the use of visual media in both the practice and production of ethnography by examining how visual representations are both products of cultural norms, values and actions and Considering the development of visual anthropology, this course will ask questions such as: what does seeing visual Anthropology, the analysis of scripts and picture mean? How are visual and other sensory media used to communicate? How do visual representations influence social relationships and actions? Can visual anthropology help produce a more publically accessible anthropology? This course may include visits to research institutes in Wellington.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 317 – Migration, Culture and Identity

In this course we explore migration as both empirical phenomenon and subject of anthropological study. We compare the intentions, outcomes and experiences of migrants, considering citizenship, belonging, and the nation-state, and look critically at recent models of transnationalism and diaspora which have challenged earlier ideas about migration and culture.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299 or GLBL 201

Not offered in 2024

ANTH 318 – Design Anthropology

Design anthropology is a form of applied anthropology that uses ethnographic, anthropological and design methodologies to foster positive social change. It is critical, collaborative, and interdisciplinary. This course uses the core principles and methods of design anthropology to explore the role of culture in shaping design practices. It asks what possibilities a design anthropology can open for sustainable change. The course will take a comparative approach to design, bringing cases specific to Aotearoa into dialogue with sites beyond. Topics addressed include health and wellbeing, urban design, environmental sustainability, Indigenous design theories and social justice.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ANTH 200–299, DSDN 171, 172, SIDN 233, 272 (X) ANTH 214, ANTH 313 in 2020, 2022

1/3 • CRN 36034 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

Cybersecurity

CYBR 171 – Cybersecurity Fundamentals

Hacker—hero or villain? Explore the world of cyber criminals, state-sponsored hackers, and commercial and government defenders. Engage directly with cybersecurity professionals as you explore diverse career paths — from incident response to digital forensics. This foundational course introduces you to social engineering, security and privacy concerns, physical security, common threats, attacks, and the techniques, frameworks, and tools used to defend and protect against them. You will leave the course equipped with essential skills to be a proactive guardian of your security without needing to be a programmer.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30039 • (L1) Mon, Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 36104 • (L2) Mon, Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 271 – Code Security

This course covers measures taken to protect software code and applications from unauthorized access, modification, or exploitation. It involves identifying and addressing potential security vulnerabilities in the source code, design, and architecture of software applications.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, NWEN 241

2/3 • CRN 30040 • Tue, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 371 – System and Network Security

This course covers system and network security, emphasizing secure design, access control, and TCP/IP protocol security. Students will gain practical skills in Linux ACLs, shell scripting, and the deployment of defence mechanisms, preparing them for modern cybersecurity challenges.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, NWEN 243

1/3 • CRN 32072 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 372 – Applied Cryptography

This course covers key cryptography concepts and services, encryption, hash functions, digital signatures, public key certificates, cryptographic protocols, and applications like SSL/TLS and blockchain.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171; COMP 261 or SWEN 221

2/3 • CRN 32078 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CYBR 373 – Governance, Risk and Compliance

This course offers a detailed exploration of risk management in cybersecurity, covering concepts from basic principles to advanced applications. It includes practical exercises on security controls, incident response, and policy development, alongside in-depth discussions on security governance, ethics, legal environments, and cloud security. We also cover cultural considerations, as well as Māori Data Sovereignty principles.

15 pts • (P) CYBR 171, 60 200-level pts from (AIML, COMP, CYBR, SWEN)

2/3 • CRN 32079 • Tue, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

Data Science

DATA 101 – Introduction to Data Science

We live in an increasingly data-driven world with the volume of data generated annually following a roughly exponential trend. Data scientists find themselves in high demand because of their skills to derive valuable insights from data. But what exactly do they do? This course provides an overview of data science. You will gain an understanding of the skill set that data scientists possess. This includes understanding data sources and types, data wrangling, data visualisation, modelling, and communicating results. Aspects of privacy law and Māori data sovereignty relevant to data science are also introduced.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 31056 • Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31191 • Mon, Thu 1-3pm [Kelburn]

DATA 201 – Techniques of Data Science

Discover the essential computational techniques at the heart of data science, encompassing the realms of data integration and encryption. Dive into the mathematical concepts and techniques that underpin the entire data lifecycle, from generation and representation to transformation.

15 pts • (P) (DATA 101 or SPCE 201), one of (COMP 102, 112, 132, INFO 102, 151), one of (ENGR 123, MATH 177, PHYS 245, QUAN 102, SPCE 245, STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 31057 • Tue, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

DATA 202 – Data Management and Programming

Explore the practical side of data management in this course designed for those working with data sources. You will get hands-on experience in programming and data management using a high-level language and SQL. You will build confidence in skills such as web scraping, data transformation, data cleaning, and the creation of data summaries and visualisations.

15 pts • (P) One of (COMP 102, 112, 132, INFO 102) or (C) INFO 226 (X) SCIE 201 in 2017-2018

1/3 • CRN 31058 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

DATA 301 – Data Science in Practice

Take your data science skills to the next level with our capstone course. Dive into interactive displays, infographics, and dashboards equipped with mathematical modelling tools and coding skills. Sharpen your communication and reporting abilities through visualisation. Explore the social and ethical aspects of data science.

15 pts • (P) DATA 201, one of (DATA 202, SCIE 201 in 2017-2018), DATA 303

2/3 • CRN 32011 • Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

DATA 302 – Machine Learning Techniques for Data Science

This course introduces a range of machine learning techniques of importance in Data Science, and gives students experience in using modern software libraries for implementing machine learning pipelines. Topics will include machine learning techniques for both supervised and unsupervised learning, including neural networks, and the design of machine learning pipelines.

15 pts • (P) DATA 201, DATA 202 (X) AIML 231, COMP 309

1/3 • CRN 36069 • Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

DATA 303 – Statistics for Data Science

In this course we uncover the role that Statistics plays in Data Science. With a focus on understanding relevant statistical methods and their practical applications, this course will help you consolidate key data science skills. Topics covered include generalised linear models, polynomial regression, generalised additive models, shrinkage methods and supervised learning methods. The topics are covered in the context of inference and prediction for continuous, count and binary outcomes.

15 pts • (P) STAT 293 or (DATA 202 (or SCIE 201 in 2017-2018) and one of (MATH 277, QUAN 203, STAT 292)).

1/3 • CRN 32012 • Mon 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

DATA 304 – Simulation and Stochastic Models

Simulation and modelling of stochastic systems, covering examples from Operations Research and Computer Science, including queues, networks and computer systems. Design, analysis and validation of simulation experiments. Previous experience with computer programming is required before starting this course. Co-taught with COMP 312.

15 pts • (P) one course from (COMP 102, 112, 132, DATA 202); one course from (ENGR 123, MATH 177, 277, STAT 292); 15 further 200-level COMP, DATA, MATH, NWEN, STAT or SWEN pts; (D) COMP 312

Not offered in 2024

DATA 351 – Data Science Internship

Students will complete an approved and supervised project in a public, private or non-profit organisation with established data science work stream. This project will enable students to gain professional work experience in the application of data science and to develop teamwork and communication skills in a relevant organisation.

15 pts • (P) DATA 201, one of (MATH 277, STAT 292), one of (DATA 202, QUAN 203, SCIE 201 in 2017-2018), 15 further 200-level points all with B+ average

2/3 • CRN 32015 • ^ Mon 9-12 [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Deaf Studies

DEAF 801 – Deaf Culture and Society

This course examines characteristics of the Deaf community as a linguistic minority by identifying aspects of Deaf identity and Deaf culture.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

DEAF 802 – Introduction to Structure and Use of NZ Sign Language

This course includes an introduction to the phonology, morphology, syntax and use of NZ Sign Language, and its history and variation.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

DEAF 803 – Introduction to Learning Sign Language

This course introduces the nature of sign language acquisition by Deaf children and non-deaf adults, with reference to general research about second language learning processes and contexts.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

DEAF 804 – Principles of Teaching NZ Sign Language

The course includes a review of major principles of language teaching approaches, and introduces techniques for teaching sign languages.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

DEAF 805 – Curriculum Design and Materials Development

This course includes an introduction to the design, preparation and use of appropriate classroom teaching materials for learners of NZ Sign Language at different levels.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

DEAF 806 – Deaf Studies Teaching Practicum

The practicum includes classroom practice in teaching NZSL, with the expectation that students apply theoretical learning from previous courses to their teaching work. In addition to teaching, activities include keeping a journal for self-review and teacher observation.

20 pts

1+2/3 • CRN 7825 • ^ tba [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

Design for Social Innovation

DSDN 101 – Design Visualisation / Pohewatanga ā-Hoahoa

This course will use a range of visualisation methods to represent design concepts and elements. Methods used include hand drawing, photography, motion graphics, animation and video.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17120 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 102 – Game, Animation and Motion Design / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu, ā-Pakiwaituhi, ā-Ranga

This course will introduce students to basic principles of game design, animation and motion design. Fundamental game design concepts, such as mechanics and loops, will be explored and analysed to enable students to conceptualise and develop playable games. Alongside game design this course also introduces introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery and graphic animation.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 34100 • [Te Aro]

DSDN 103 – Critical Approaches to Design Communication/ Tukanga Arohaehae Kōrero ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to the role of visual and written communication in contemporary design practice. A range of techniques will be taught to help students communicate design concepts, critical thinking, and design processes to develop and clearly articulate their creative ideas and observations.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 34118 • Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 104 – Digital Fabrication / Waihanga Matihiko

In this course students engage with emerging technologies to visualise and create 3D forms, bodies and spaces. Students address the distinctive features of creating form and making digitally fabricated artefacts.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17152 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 111 – Design Composition / Hanganga ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to, and develops their fluency in, design vocabularies and composition specific to the configuration of design elements. Analogue and digital techniques are used to explore body, space, form and movement.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17123 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 132 – Design Narratives and Visual Storytelling / Paki ā-Hoahoa me te Pakiwaitara ā-Ataata

This course introduces students to narratives and storytelling in the context of visual design. Students will be exposed to a range of traditional and contemporary examples including Māori storytelling practice and examples from film, animation, digital and physical games and comics. Students will explore and apply the principles, structures and techniques introduced in class through linear and non-linear storytelling exercises.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

2/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 141 – Design Mediums and Processes / Ngā Huarahi me Ngā Tukanga ā-Hoahoa

This course focuses on creative exploration of materials and processes. Students will learn various manual and digital techniques and apply these to the exploration and production of expressive forms.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17126 • Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding and AI I / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding and AI for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design and Photography / Hoahoa Whakanikoniko me te Whakaahuatanga

This course explores the basics of graphic design and photography through hands-on projects. Students are introduced to professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of visual works that express visual identity and voice.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30061 • Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 33344 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 153 – Fashion Systems and Ecologies / Pūnaha me te Hauropi ā-Kākahu

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Tue 1.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 171 – Design in a Global Context / Hoahoa i te Horopaki o te Ao Whānui

By observing and analysing historical approaches and responses in and between cultures and design, students will explore design from a place-based perspective.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17129 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Wed 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31178 • [Distance]

DSDN 172 – Whakapapa Design I

This course is deeply rooted in Māori culture. Whakapapa Design emphasises ethical behaviour and the consequences of our actions as designers. Whakapapa Design highlights interconnections between people, place, and all living entities and offers a path to restore the health and well-being of both people and the planet through narrative, making, language, and shared values. Whakapapa Design is guided by the Māori tikanga; whakawhanaungatanga and manaakitanga.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30062 • Mon 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 211 – Design Psychology I / Mātai Hinengaro ā-Hoahoa I

Students will learn how designs can affect our thinking, our emotions and our actions. The course will introduce students to basic psychology principles. Through the practice of designing students will learn how to use psychology principles and methods to inspire, guide and refine their design process. There will be a strong aesthetic and creative goal in mind throughout the projects.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from BDI or BAS Schedules or GLBL 101 or PSYC 122 (X) IXXN 211

2/3 • CRN 36133 • ^ Mon 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 221 – Design for Sustainability / Hoahoa mō te tōitutanga

An introduction to the key concepts, theories and methodologies relevant to sustainable design and their application to a cross-disciplinary design practice. Students will develop awareness of sustainability from an ecological perspective and, within this context, will investigate the challenges and opportunities in propelling positive environmental, social, and cultural change through design. Fundamental sustainable design frameworks and strategies will be examined and applied through the development of creative studio-based projects.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 points from the BDI or BAS schedules; (X) SIDN 221

1/3 • CRN 36134 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 242 – Whakapapa Design II / Hoahoa ā haere ake nei II

DSDN 242 builds on DSDN 172 Whakapapa Design I. This course introduces students to Mauri Ora as a design methodology. Students learn essential practice based tikanga within kaitiakitanga (guardianship) roles. This course is taught through pakiwaitara and making mahi toi (art/ design) and provides students a grounding in the knowledge and skill required to reflect Mauri Ora within their discipline specific practices and contexts. 

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) CCDN 242, SIDN 242

2/3 • CRN 36135 • ^ Fri 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 244 – Photographics / Ngā Whakaahuatanga

Photography is explored as both a creative process and a design research tool. Students engage in both photographic practice and theoretical exploration, articulating their response to the photographic medium and developing their theoretical tool kit for analysing new image forms in relation to multiple types of design. 

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules; (X) MDDN 244

2/3 • CRN 36150 • Fri 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

Not offered in 2024

DSDN 281 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent study work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 233 – Accessible Design / Tā te Hoahoa Titiro I

Accessibility is about designing physical and digital products and services inclusively. Accessible design upholds people's human rights and removes barriers to participation in society. In this course you will learn foundational skills and theoretical approaches to make your designs accessible, so they work well for disabled people, meet national and international standards and enhance the use experience for everyone.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) CCDN 233

2/3 • CRN 32129 • ^ Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 242 – Whakapapa Design II

SIDN 242 builds on DSDN 172 Whakapapa Design I. This course introduces students to Mauri Ora as a design methodology. Students learn essential practice based on tikanga within kaitiakitanga (guardianship) roles. This course is taught through pakiwaitara and making mahi toi (art/design) and provides students a grounding in the knowledge and skills required to reflect Mauri Ora within their discipline specific practices and contexts.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) CCDN 242

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 271 – Design in Transition / Hoahoa hai Kaupapa Whakawhiti

This course investigates emergent design methods and strategies that prioritise the use of design-led societal change. Students will gain an appreciation of the interconnectedness and interdependency of social, cultural, economic and political systems. Students will challenge existing methods of design thinking and doing and envision new approaches that can lead to radical and positive change both in teams and individually.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) CCDN 271

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 272 – Design Toolkits for Co-Design Practice / Hoahoa Mahi Ngātahi I

Co-design is a fundamental practice used in design. Enabling collective and equitable engagement with communities it a core competency to designing in the 21st century. Students will be introduced to industry standards and best practices for working with and within culturally and socially challenging contexts. Students will research, plan, design, prototype, trial and communicate the results of existing and design new co-design process and/or tool that aim to empower positive change.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 32127 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 321 – Design Justice / Hoahoa o Te Nāianei

This course introduces students to the complex relations between design, people and the environment, and explores the notion of design justice, as a provocation for creating positive impact through design practice and of design practice. The course explores design ethics and responsibilities in relation to climate and environmental justice; indigenous justice; disability justice; social justice, through creative projects.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or GLBL 201

1/3 • CRN 32126 • ^ Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 333 – Design Ethnography II / Tā te Hoahoa Titiro II

Building on SIDN 233 Design Ethnography I, this course offers students the opportunity to further develop their cultural research skills through field observations, interviews, interpretations, and reflections. Students will create a personal research portfolio to support further study and/or professional activities.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including SIDN 233

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 352 – Whakapapa Design III / Hoahoa ā haere ake nei III

In this course students explore through their creative practice the rich stories/pūrākau and whakapapa of local communities and environments to establish meaningful connections (whakawhanaungatanga) and insights into both the diverse and unique needs of others. Engaging with Iwi, Hapū and community directly, students will be introduced to real-world issues. This immersive experience aims to instil in students a deep sense of responsibility as kaitiaki, or guardians, of both the stories and the spaces they call home—both in the present and for generations to come.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including DSDN 242 or SIDN 242

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 372 – Service Design / Hoahoa ā-Ratonga

In this course students consider the transitional changes required to achieve shifts in social infrastructure, existing paradigms and organisational networks and pipelines. Students create and articulate sustainable pipelines and systems that acknowledge the health and well-being of both humans and nature.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or GLBL 201

2/3 • CRN 32124 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 390 – Design for Social Innovation Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako

Within Agents of Change students create solutions that can impact positive social, cultural, political, economic and/or environmental change. Students use design tools, research methodologies and emergent co- design practices to design prototypes, and communicate and analyse design interventions that offer transitional pathways towards positive change. Students engage with diverse guiding values, including mana and manaaki, (respect and care) alongside whakawhanaungatanga (generation of authentic connections), to impact social awareness and/or change.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371 and 60 200-level pts including DSDN 242 or SIDN 242 and SIDN 272

2/3 • CRN 32122 • ^ Mon, Thu 3.30-6pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 481 – Research Methods/Tikanga ā-Rangahau

This seminar-based course introduces postgraduate students to current qualitative methods in design research. It explores a range of creative and empirical and culturally appropriate methods, concentrating on the formulation of research questions, the identification or appropriate research methods, and the articulation of research methodologies and analytical frameworks.

30 pts

1/3 • CRN 26219 • Tue 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

Design Innovation

See Culture+Context, Industrial Design and Media Design

DSDN 101 – Design Visualisation / Pohewatanga ā-Hoahoa

This course will use a range of visualisation methods to represent design concepts and elements. Methods used include hand drawing, photography, motion graphics, animation and video.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17120 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 102 – Game, Animation and Motion Design / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu, ā-Pakiwaituhi, ā-Ranga

This course will introduce students to basic principles of game design, animation and motion design. Fundamental game design concepts, such as mechanics and loops, will be explored and analysed to enable students to conceptualise and develop playable games. Alongside game design this course also introduces introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery and graphic animation.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 34100 • [Te Aro]

DSDN 103 – Critical Approaches to Design Communication/ Tukanga Arohaehae Kōrero ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to the role of visual and written communication in contemporary design practice. A range of techniques will be taught to help students communicate design concepts, critical thinking, and design processes to develop and clearly articulate their creative ideas and observations.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 34118 • Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 104 – Digital Fabrication / Waihanga Matihiko

In this course students engage with emerging technologies to visualise and create 3D forms, bodies and spaces. Students address the distinctive features of creating form and making digitally fabricated artefacts.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17152 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 111 – Design Composition / Hanganga ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to, and develops their fluency in, design vocabularies and composition specific to the configuration of design elements. Analogue and digital techniques are used to explore body, space, form and movement.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17123 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 132 – Design Narratives and Visual Storytelling / Paki ā-Hoahoa me te Pakiwaitara ā-Ataata

This course introduces students to narratives and storytelling in the context of visual design. Students will be exposed to a range of traditional and contemporary examples including Māori storytelling practice and examples from film, animation, digital and physical games and comics. Students will explore and apply the principles, structures and techniques introduced in class through linear and non-linear storytelling exercises.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

2/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 141 – Design Mediums and Processes / Ngā Huarahi me Ngā Tukanga ā-Hoahoa

This course focuses on creative exploration of materials and processes. Students will learn various manual and digital techniques and apply these to the exploration and production of expressive forms.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17126 • Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding and AI I / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding and AI for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design and Photography / Hoahoa Whakanikoniko me te Whakaahuatanga

This course explores the basics of graphic design and photography through hands-on projects. Students are introduced to professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of visual works that express visual identity and voice.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30061 • Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 33344 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 153 – Fashion Systems and Ecologies / Pūnaha me te Hauropi ā-Kākahu

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Tue 1.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 171 – Design in a Global Context / Hoahoa i te Horopaki o te Ao Whānui

By observing and analysing historical approaches and responses in and between cultures and design, students will explore design from a place-based perspective.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17129 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Wed 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31178 • [Distance]

DSDN 172 – Whakapapa Design I

This course is deeply rooted in Māori culture. Whakapapa Design emphasises ethical behaviour and the consequences of our actions as designers. Whakapapa Design highlights interconnections between people, place, and all living entities and offers a path to restore the health and well-being of both people and the planet through narrative, making, language, and shared values. Whakapapa Design is guided by the Māori tikanga; whakawhanaungatanga and manaakitanga.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30062 • Mon 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 201 – Animation and Visual Effects I / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata I

This course explores 3D design principles unique to creating animation and visual effects media. Students will create a series of digital artefacts for the screen. Tutorials cover development methods specific to digital content, with emphasis on fundamental principles and effective design process. In lab sessions students will use 3D modelling software and 2D image manipulation software to generate compelling and innovative visual imagery that demonstrates an understanding of animation and visual effects media.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the ANFX major

1/3 • CRN 31161 • ^ Mon, Wed 2.30-4pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 211 – Character Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Kiripuaki I

This course offers an introduction to animated storytelling through the art of character animation. We survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, from large scale studio features to experimental auteur films. In response students will create their own animated films by designing, building and rigging characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students will gain insight into animated film production workflows and will acquire the technical skills to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts including DSDN 102 (DSDN 132 prior to 2024) and 15 further pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 31162 • ^ Fri 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 221 – Digital 2D Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua I

This course introduces digital 2D and frame-by-frame techniques in modern animation practice. Historical and contemporary examples will be studied including classic feature films, independent shorts, music videos, and video games. Students will apply basic animation principles and learn introductory 2D techniques within a digital workflow, suitable to professional or personal practice.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses

2/3 • CRN 32097 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 201 – Graphic Design / Hoahoa ā-Whakairoiro

In this course students will develop their understanding and facility with the elements and principles of graphic design. Areas include typography, colour, layout, heirarchy, balance and space. Students will look at the history of type and graphic design, and how this informs contemporary communication in print and screen. Students will become familiar with both historical and contemporary typographic and design styles and genres, and develop a critical eye for the complexities of graphic design.

15 pts • (P) Acceptance into the COMD major

1/3 • CRN 30072 • ^ Fri 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 211 – Drawing I / Tuhi Pikitia I

This course will allow students to practice traditional and contemporary approaches to both observational and imaginative drawing. In addition to building on skills and techniques developed in earlier courses, students will be encouraged to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 30073 • ^ Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 231 – Illustration / Pikitia Whakaari

In this course students will learn to illustrate and use illustration thoughtfully and effectively in a range of media. Historical and contemporary approaches will be studied from various perspectives: aesthetic, social, and commercial. Students will develop and complete illustration project briefs using a range of digital and physical tools and techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 45 pts from the BDI or BAS Schedules

2/3 • CRN 30074 • ^ Thu 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 241 – Visual Narratives / Ngā Paki Ataata

This course focuses on the structure and methods of effective storytelling, as expressed visually. Readings provide a broad survey of stories that employ visual narratives in innovative or instructive ways. Techniques are drawn from comics, books, graphic novels, film, children's books, and animation.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 45 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 33125 • ^ Tue 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 251 – Information Design / Hoahoa ā-Pārongo

This course addresses the demand for well-designed visual presentation of data in the information age. The course is interdisciplinary, combining skills from graphic design, interaction design, and data science. Students practice information design skills with applications beyond the traditional design professions. Students will shape data-driven messages in order to make knowledge accessible visually.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

COMD 261 – Motion Design I / Hoahoa ā-Nekehanga I

This course introduces basic concepts of motion design and time-based media in communication and graphic environments. Topics covered include introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery, graphic animation, as well as creative strategies and workflow. Students will apply concepts from motion design to time-based projects and outputs.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI schedule

2/3 • CRN 32098 • ^ Mon 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 211 – Design Psychology I / Mātai Hinengaro ā-Hoahoa I

Students will learn how designs can affect our thinking, our emotions and our actions. The course will introduce students to basic psychology principles. Through the practice of designing students will learn how to use psychology principles and methods to inspire, guide and refine their design process. There will be a strong aesthetic and creative goal in mind throughout the projects.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from BDI or BAS Schedules or GLBL 101 or PSYC 122 (X) IXXN 211

2/3 • CRN 36133 • ^ Mon 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 221 – Design for Sustainability / Hoahoa mō te tōitutanga

An introduction to the key concepts, theories and methodologies relevant to sustainable design and their application to a cross-disciplinary design practice. Students will develop awareness of sustainability from an ecological perspective and, within this context, will investigate the challenges and opportunities in propelling positive environmental, social, and cultural change through design. Fundamental sustainable design frameworks and strategies will be examined and applied through the development of creative studio-based projects.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 points from the BDI or BAS schedules; (X) SIDN 221

1/3 • CRN 36134 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 242 – Whakapapa Design II / Hoahoa ā haere ake nei II

DSDN 242 builds on DSDN 172 Whakapapa Design I. This course introduces students to Mauri Ora as a design methodology. Students learn essential practice based tikanga within kaitiakitanga (guardianship) roles. This course is taught through pakiwaitara and making mahi toi (art/ design) and provides students a grounding in the knowledge and skill required to reflect Mauri Ora within their discipline specific practices and contexts. 

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) CCDN 242, SIDN 242

2/3 • CRN 36135 • ^ Fri 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 244 – Photographics / Ngā Whakaahuatanga

Photography is explored as both a creative process and a design research tool. Students engage in both photographic practice and theoretical exploration, articulating their response to the photographic medium and developing their theoretical tool kit for analysing new image forms in relation to multiple types of design. 

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules; (X) MDDN 244

2/3 • CRN 36150 • Fri 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

Not offered in 2024

DSDN 281 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent study work undertaken on an approved course of study.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

FADN 201 – Fashion Design Studio I / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu I

In this intermediate course students will learn the principles of fashion design by trialling various pattern design and manufacturing techniques in the development of sustainable wearable forms. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique and ethically focused design position.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 32117 • ^ Mon, Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

FADN 202 – Fashion Design Studio II / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu II

This intermediate course will extend on the principles of fashion design covered in FADN 201 with an emphasis on digital tools. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique design position.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including FADN 201

2/3 • CRN 32115 • Mon, Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

FADN 242 – Generative Textiles / Ngā Papanga ā-Waihanga

Using generative approaches to textile design informed by broad cultural contexts and/or emerging technologies, students taking this course will explore the systemised creation of textiles. Students will be exposed to a range of software, manufacturing and production techniques to create artefacts using a constructive rather than restrictive set of rules.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

Not offered in 2024

FADN 273 – Fashion in Society / Kākahu i te Papori

Across human history, fashion has played an important role in every aspect of culture: religious order, social status, occupational position and rank, personal freedom (or lack thereof) and rejection of the status quo. In this course students will analyse precedents as well as cross-cultural examples, including Mātauranga Māori, that reveal the nuanced socio-political narratives embodied in the garments and objects that people wear.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

3/3 • CRN 32123 • tba [Distance]

GAME 201 – Game Design I / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu I

Students are introduced to indie games, arcade games and early home console experiences as a pathway to understanding the fundamental requirements of game design. This course builds upon game mechanics and core loops, utilising these concepts to create fully formed and engaging gaming experiences. Students will use game design software and establish intermediate game programming knowledge, and gain the capabilities to ideate, pitch concepts, and develop playable 2D games using a variety of software applications.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 102 or COMP 103 and 30 further pts from the BDI, BAS or BBSc schedules; (X) MDDN 221, 243

1/3 • CRN 35012 • Tue 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

GAME 202 – Digital Asset Creation: Auaha Huarawa Matihiko

This course will allow students to explore and develop art and animation assets for game design with a focus on optimisation and working within the limitations that real time hardware can often impose. Students will learn the history of developing real-time assets and will be introduced to a variety of methods to create efficient work for game development. Over the duration of the course students will produce a variety of real time assets in both 2D and 3D, exploring and experimenting with different techniques in optimisation and developing an understanding of game art workflow.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 35009 • Tue, Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

GAME 203 – Game Prototyping – Design: Tauira Whakamātau ā-Kēmu – Hoahoa

This course uses game jams and hackathons as a learning environment where students work with commercial developers to learn how to develop new and innovative game prototypes. Design students will be collaborating with students from the Graphics and Games major.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 102 or COMP 103 (X) CGRA 259 taken concurrently

1+2+3/3 • CRN 35010 • Fri 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

GAME 204 – Writing for Games

This course focuses on the craft of writing fiction and narrative design for interactive media, including video games, interactive fiction, board games, and VR. No previous experience with Game Design and/or Script/Writing is required. Students play and analyse contemporary story-driven games and experiences. Students learn digital tools for crafting interactive narratives and producing games prototypes. 

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI, BAS or BBSc schedules or CGRA, FILM, WRIT, THEA, ENGL, LCCM courses

2/3 • CRN 36149 • Wed 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

INDN 204 – Materialised Codes / Ngā Waehere i Puta

This course will explore a variety of approaches to material simulation and coded design processes. Topics covered will include advanced rendering, rapid digital iteration, and the translating of digital form to physical artefact. Students will look outside of traditional CAD software and expand their skills in the areas of polygon modelling and simulated materials to discover intuitive design and iteration processes. Students will represent the outcomes of these digital design processes as highly refined rendered images.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 28186 • ^ Mon 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 211 – Communicative Products / Ngā Hua o te Whakakōrero

Industrial designers communicate primarily through the physical aesthetic qualities of the products they create. In this founding industrial design course students will explore and expand their three dimensional visual vocabulary to empower them to produce meaningful and articulate objects. This will be based on experiments into a products form, material and surface finish explored through physical materials and digital manufacturing processes.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17197 • ^ Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 212 – Responsive Products / Ngā Hua o te Whakautu

This course investigates how industrially designed products respond to the people and environment in which they exist. This four-dimensional quality of products offers significant opportunity for design experimentation and expression. Through the use of dynamic components students will be challenged to design specific, responsive products and experiences.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 17198 • Thu 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

INDN 241 – Sustainable Mediums / Ngā Huarahi Toitūtanga

This course stimulates students to explore and experiment with a range of design-focused mediums, materials and techniques. In addition to material and technical proficiency students will gain competence in creating contextual design interventions and responsive objects with a specific focus on sustainability.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 28187 • ^ Tue 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 252 – Physiology Codes / Ngā Waehere ā-Mātai Whaiaroaro

This course examines the dynamic complexity of the human body and its form, mapping personal variation, movement and anatomy as the inspiration for products. 3D scanning and colour 3D printing will be used to collect data and create a tailored product.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17199 • ^ Tue 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 201 – Design for Experience I / Hoahoa kia Whai Wheako I

In this course students will learn about the process of user experience (UX) design, and common research and design techniques, such as: observation, interviews, prototyping and user testing. Students will also become skilled at using industry-standard tools and software.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 30063 • ^ Wed 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 202 – Design for Experience II / Hoahoa kia Whai Wheako II

In this course students will become adept at user experience (UX) design techniques, such as: case study analysis, user interface design, rapid visualisation and prototyping. Students will also become skilled at using the industry standard tools and techniques of UX design.

15 pts • (P) 45 200-level pts including IXXN 201 (X) IXXN 302

2/3 • CRN 36151 • Thu 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

IXXN 211 – Design Psychology I / Mātai Hinengaro ā-Hoahoa I

Students will learn how designs can affect our thinking, our emotions and our actions. The course will introduce students to basic psychology principles. Through the practice of designing students will learn how to use psychology principles and methods to inspire, guide and refine their design process. There will be a strong aesthetic and creative goal in mind throughout the projects.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) DSDN 251

Not offered in 2024

IXXN 221 – Web Design / Hoahoa ā-Ipurangi

In this course students explore and implement Web design tools and techniques. Students will also learn about principles and practices of web accessibility. An emphasis is placed on creative approaches to front-end development, design and scripting techniques.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

3/3 • CRN 30064 • ^ tba [Distance]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 251 – Information Design / Hoahoa ā-Pārongo

This course addresses the demand for well-designed visual presentation of data in the information age. The course is interdisciplinary, combining skills from graphic design, interaction design, and data science. Students practice information design skills with applications beyond the traditional design professions. Students will shape data-driven messages in order to make knowledge accessible visually.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 36136 • Mon 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

MDDN 201 – Internet and Social Media Design / Hoahoa ā-Ipurangi me te Arapāho ā-Papori

In this course students will learn to design for digitally networked infrastructures such as the Internet, and the various protocols and frameworks that belong to this ever-expanding realm. Topics will include networking basics, Internet cultures and the privacy paradox, with a particular emphasis on designing for Social Media and critical analysis of the complex media environments that this creates.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 points from BDI or BAS Schedules

Not offered in 2024

MDDN 211 – Digital Video Creation / Auaha Ata Matihiko

In this course students will conceive, shoot, edit, and remix video-based projects. Students will learn video editing techniques, shooting video using DSLR cameras, elementary lighting, codecs, compositing, cinematography, and working with audio alongside building video content.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 points from BDI or BAS Schedules

1/3 • CRN 18235 • ^ Tue 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 222 – Virtual Reality Design / Taupuni Ao Hoahoa

Students are introduced to the histories and technical development of Virtual Reality both as a field of inquiry and as a creative platform for novel and engaging multimedia experiences. Topics include examples of VR from a variety of fields such as science, cinematography and new media arts. Students will critically evaluate contemporary VR environments using state of the art technology including a variety of hardware platforms.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 32110 • ^ Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 231 – Physical Computing / Rorohiko ā-Ōkiko

Introduction to electronics, circuit design, and programming as design tools for creative electronic solutions. This course is for students wishing to explore physical computing and interaction design (including IoT). Thinking beyond the mouse/keyboard/screen paradigm, simple techniques using microcontrollers and sensors will be taught to build smart objects and systems.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 142 or COMP 102 and 60 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules; (X) MDDN 251

2/3 • CRN 32170 • ^ Tue, Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 242 – Creative Coding and AI II / Waehere ā-Auaha II

This course focuses on working with simple algorithms to generate visuals, as well as compositing different media, such as photography. Inspired by real world phenomena, this course uses parameterised design and generative modelling to produce creative coded design solutions. AI tools will be used in this course to support both design workflows and code reviews.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules and including one of (DSDN 142, COMP 102, 112)

1/3 • CRN 19917 • ^ Tue 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 244 – Photographics / Ngā Whakaahuatanga

Photography is explored as both a creative process and a design research tool. Students engage in both photographic practice and theoretical exploration, articulating their response to the photographic medium and developing their theoretical tool kit for analysing new image forms in relation to multiple types of design.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 144 or 151

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 233 – Accessible Design / Tā te Hoahoa Titiro I

Accessibility is about designing physical and digital products and services inclusively. Accessible design upholds people's human rights and removes barriers to participation in society. In this course you will learn foundational skills and theoretical approaches to make your designs accessible, so they work well for disabled people, meet national and international standards and enhance the use experience for everyone.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) CCDN 233

2/3 • CRN 32129 • ^ Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 242 – Whakapapa Design II

SIDN 242 builds on DSDN 172 Whakapapa Design I. This course introduces students to Mauri Ora as a design methodology. Students learn essential practice based on tikanga within kaitiakitanga (guardianship) roles. This course is taught through pakiwaitara and making mahi toi (art/design) and provides students a grounding in the knowledge and skills required to reflect Mauri Ora within their discipline specific practices and contexts.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or permission of Head of School (X) CCDN 242

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 271 – Design in Transition / Hoahoa hai Kaupapa Whakawhiti

This course investigates emergent design methods and strategies that prioritise the use of design-led societal change. Students will gain an appreciation of the interconnectedness and interdependency of social, cultural, economic and political systems. Students will challenge existing methods of design thinking and doing and envision new approaches that can lead to radical and positive change both in teams and individually.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) CCDN 271

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 272 – Design Toolkits for Co-Design Practice / Hoahoa Mahi Ngātahi I

Co-design is a fundamental practice used in design. Enabling collective and equitable engagement with communities it a core competency to designing in the 21st century. Students will be introduced to industry standards and best practices for working with and within culturally and socially challenging contexts. Students will research, plan, design, prototype, trial and communicate the results of existing and design new co-design process and/or tool that aim to empower positive change.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 32127 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 301 – Animation and Visual Effects II / Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata II

This trimester 1 course is the pre-production for students' Capstone Project in Trimester 2. Students are exposed to concepts and precedents relating to production, pitching and storytelling, and apply these to their own pitch and project development.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 201

1/3 • CRN 32002 • Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 302 – Introduction to Technical Effects and Simulation

This course is an introduction to to essential concepts and practices technical artists employ when creating effects shots for screen roduction. Typical applications include film and games, but students may also find the course useful for exploring novel approaches to motion graphics, scientific visualisation or architectural studies. Example topics will include particle systems, fire/smoke simulation and rigid body dynamics (RBD) with the integration of digital assets and environments. 

15 pts • (P) 45 pts at 200 or 300 level from ANFX, GAME, CGRA (X) DSDN 383 in 2023

Not offered in 2024

ANFX 311 – Character Animation II / Pakiwaituhi ā-Kiripuaki II

This course builds on Character Animation I and examines the art of character animation in depth. Students survey a range of animated film across genres and styles, with a focus on contemporary animation. Students will design, build, and rig characters, and bring these to life on the screen. Students will refine their technical skills and deepen their understanding of animation film production workflows in order to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 211

1/3 • CRN 32003 • Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 321 – Digital 2D Animation II/Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua II

This course expands upon the practice of digital 2D and frame-by-frame animation in digital workflow. Students will learn intermediate animation principles and techniques for digital 2D production and its effective synthesis with other forms of animation and moving image. In addition to hands-on animation practice in the studio, students will watch, analyse, and discuss examples from a variety of contemporary sources, including film, music videos, and games.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 221

2/3 • CRN 33218 • ^ Tue 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 390 – Animation and Visual Effects Capstone/ Whakatinana ā-Wheako: Pakiwaituhi me ngā Mariko Ataata

The capstone project represents the culmination of study in the Animation and Visual Effects major. Students are offered the freedom to further develop any of the skills, concepts and approaches learnt from other courses. The course will engage the industry through a combination of guest lecture, brief development, and critique. The course focuses on portfolio and professional development.

30 pts • (P) ANFX 301, DSDN 371, and acceptance into the ANFX major (X) ANFX 312

2/3 • CRN 33213 • Mon, Wed 3.30-6pm [Te Aro]

COMD 302 – Typography / Tātai Momotuhi

Students will hone and refine their critical eye for typography and delve into the anatomy, materiality, and complexities of type. There will be an intensive study of typographic hierarchies and expressive typography through practical exercises. Projects will introduce opportunities to work within constraints while challenging traditional typographic precedents.

15 pts • (P) P 60 200-level pts including COMD 201 (X) COMD 201 prior to 2023

1/3 • CRN 32099 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 325 – Print Media Now: Design for Publications / Arapāho Mātātuhi o Nāianei: Hoahoa mō ngā Whakaputanga

This course introduces students to specialist print design skills and knowledge. Print will be explored in many contexts, from hot metal and letterpress processes through the University’s own letterpress workshop, through to contemporary in-studio processes, such as silkscreen printing and risograph printing. There will be a particular emphasis on the craft of book design, taking a broad view of what defines a book – from simple zine-making through to more complex artefacts.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

Not offered in 2024

COMD 331 – Concept Art and World Building / Toi Ariā me te Waihanga ā-Ao

In this course students will use a variety of techniques to craft concepts and visual images that convey speculative or fictional worlds. Contemporary and historical approaches to concept art will be critically analysed. World building across media (illustration, graphic novels, film, animation, books, and games) will be explored through examples and exercises.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM/THEA/WRIT courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

COMD 335 – Comics and Graphic Novels / Pukawaituhi me ngā Pakimaero Waituhi

This course examines formal aspects of comics and graphic novels, their historical development, visual and culturally diverse vocabularies, and narrative applications. Readings provide examples of graphic storytelling and critique theoretical and practical approaches to the form. Students will develop and complete their own comics.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 45 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or ENGL, FILM, THEA, WRIT, LCCM courses

2/3 • CRN 32104 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 342 – Generative Graphic Design / Hoahoa Waihanga Whakairoiro

Students will use a design process, set of instructions, or computer programme, to generate a solution that blends design artistry with artificially generated output. This blend of traditional and emerging techniques will produce surprising outcomes. Students will create and analyse generative works. The purpose of the course is to explore how generative techniques can add to a design practice.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 142 and 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses

2/3 • CRN 30080 • Wed 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

COMD 351 – Writing for Design / Tuhituhi mō te Hoahoa

Students taking this course will develop a command of writing styles for use in creative practice. Projects will delve into self-reflective and exploratory writing about design, as well as critical interpretation. The course will also cover writing techniques that serve creative practice, such as client briefs, feedback and reports.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI schedule or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

COMD 390 – Communication Design Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Kōrero Hoahoa

In this course students produce a final work to demonstrate the skills and knowledge gained in Communication Design. Students complete a large studio-based project or portfolio demonstrating design mastery. In seminar-style discussions, students develop their own briefs or portfolio goals that address advanced problems or questions in communication design. Projects are published, and engagement with a community beyond the school is a goal of the work in this course.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371, COMD 201 (X) COMD 301

2/3 • CRN 32105 • ^ Mon 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 311 – International Design Studio / Taupuni Hoahoa ā-Ao Whānui

A cross-cultural design exploration of designed objects, spaces and sites, with special emphasis on understanding why and how they are uniquely formed by the technological, historical and cultural contexts that are part of, and the design inspiration that can be derived from such understanding. The course has two components: field analysis and studio project.

20 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from the BDI Schedule

Not offered in 2024

DSDN 321 – Interactive Products / Ngā Hua Hei Pāhekohekotanga

Students will investigate real-world issues through interaction design methodologies to identify problems, needs and desires that can be addressed through physical and digital interactions. Students will learn to design scenarios and prototype interactions through quick 4D sketching. Students will work in participatory teams to apply tools for testing their designs and develop professional documentation skills using video. 

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) INDN 321

1/3 • CRN 36138 • ^ Tue 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 331 – Concept Art and World Building / Toi Ariā me te Waihanga ā-Ao

In this course students will use a variety of techniques to craft concepts and visual images that convey speculative or fictional worlds. Contemporary and historical approaches to concept art will be critically analysed. World building across media (illustration, graphic novels, film, animation, books, and games) will be explored through examples and exercises.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) COMD 331

1/3 • CRN 36142 • Wed 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 351 – Writing for Design / Tuhituhi mō te Hoahoa

Students taking this course will develop a command of writing styles for use in creative practice. Projects will delve into self-reflective and exploratory writing about design, as well as critical interpretation. The course will also cover writing techniques that serve creative practice, such as client briefs, feedback and reports.

15 pts • (P) 45 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI schedule (X) COMD 351

1/3 • CRN 36143 • Fri 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 371 – Research Explorations for Capstone / Hōpara Rangahau mō te Whakatinana ā-Wheako

This course prepares students for the Capstone projects and across disciplines. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (generates meaningful connections) between design disciplines, research methods and diverse knowledges. This course asks students to demonstrate a critical approach to design through actively engaging with research as a part of the design thinking, process and praxis.

15 pts • (P) 45 200-level pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 36148 • Fri 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

DSDN 381 – Directed Individual Study / Ako Arahanga Takitahi

Independent study work undertaken on an approved course of study.

20 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 32179 • [Te Aro]

FADN 301 – Fashion Design Studio Ill / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu Ill

In this course students will explore various design and production methods used in fashion design and wearable technology. Students will be encouraged to use digital manufacturing techniques as well as traditional and/or experimental elements incorporating a range of textile properties. Current issues critical to the domain of fashion and wearables will be discussed.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including FADN 202

1/3 • CRN 33024 • Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 321 – Character and Costume Design / Hoahoa ā-Kahu Whakaari

In this course students will investigate the narrative potential of wearable items through hands-on production as well as cultural study and research, including the historical significance of Māori fashion in Aotearoa. Examples from the professional domain will be discussed, including costume and character design for stage, presentation, performance art and film, and digital costumes in VR, animation and game design.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 33016 • Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 331 – Wearable Technology / Hangarau Hei Kākahu Mau

Students will explore the field of wearable technology through research and practical experimentation. They will learn how to use various technologies to create successful reactive and interactive wearable projects.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 142 and 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) MDDN 331, 351

Not offered in 2024

FADN 341 – High Performance Fashion and Wearables / Kākahu Whai Tikanga me Ngā Kākahu Hei Mau

In this course students will investigate the design of garments, uniforms and equipment that are subject to extreme levels of stress by the performer and/or the environment. Students will be introduced to topics that include design for sport, hazardous occupations and for people with disabilities, emphasising a variety of traditional and newly emerging fabrics and materials. Through project work students will address one or more of these special instances of worn designs.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

Not offered in 2024

FADN 390 – Fashion Design Technology Capstone/ Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hangarau Hoahoa ā-Kākahu

This course leads students through a phased capstone project in which students learn to integrate skills, concepts, and approaches covered in the Fashion Design Technology major. Students will develop their unique focus through a research-informed project that critically engages with how fashion relates to contemporary issues facing society. Emphasis will be placed on students seeing every aspect of the fashion system as an opportunity and necessity to engage through design.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371, FADN 301

2/3 • CRN 33010 • Wed, Fri 10-12.30 [Te Aro]

GAME 301 – Game Design II / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu II

In this course students will build on the knowledge gained in Game Design I to design within the expanded parameters of a 3D environment. Using games as a medium of exploration, including examples from the early transitional period of 2D to 3D gaming as design precedents, students will gain a broader comprehension of contemporary gaming as the medium continues to develop.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including GAME 201 (X) MDDN 321, MDDN 343

1/3 • CRN 36014 • Mon, Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

GAME 302 – Game Engines for Design / Pūkaha Kēmu mō to Hoahoa

Students will use and explore the game engine as a design tool. Creating data visualisations and virtual exhibition spaces, students will engage with the game engine in ways both useful to game designers, animators, user experience architects and media designers more broadly.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points Including 30pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA 252 (X) CCDN 344, MDDN 344

Not offered in 2024

GAME 390 – Game Design Capstone: Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa ā-Kēmu

In this course students will develop and build large scale video game concepts in collaborative, interdisciplinary teams. Design students will be collaborating with students from the Graphics and Games major. Students will apply their respective skills and knowledge from previous courses in order to develop a refined playable game output. During production students will document their development, their contribution and critically reflect on their design process. This courses is offered for the first time in 2024.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371, GAME 301 (X) CGRA 359 taken concurrently

2/3 • CRN 35011 • Tue, Thu 3.30-6pm [Te Aro]

INDN 311 – Publishable Products / Ngā Hua Hei Whakaputanga

This course challenges students to explore and engage with specific online publications that inspire them to design a product suitable for publication to an international audience. To reach this standard students will select appropriate media including immaculately finished visual prototypes, photography/video, rendering, animation and writing to create a compelling and contemporary narrative.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17200 • Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

INDN 321 – Interactive Products / Ngā Hua Hei Pāhekohekotanga

Students will investigate real-world issues through interaction design methodologies to identify problems, needs and desires that can be addressed through physical and digital interactions. Students will learn to design scenarios and prototype interactions through quick 4D sketching. Students will work in participatory teams to apply tools for testing their designs and develop professional documentation skills using video.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including either 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or one of (MARK 203, COMP 313, EEEN 302 (or ECEN 302), PSYC 232 (or PSYC 325))

Not offered in 2024

INDN 332 – Future Under Negotiation / Te Matapaki i te Anamata

This course explores industrial design from a historic, contemporary and future (speculative) perspective with a specific focus on the implications of technological evolution. Emerging issues such as artificial intelligence, biological printing and climate change will be explored through design experiments and scenario building.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 28189 • ^ Tue 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 341 – Innovative Mediums / Ngā Huarahi Hei Auahatanga

This course asks students to plan and create design-driven innovations for the near future through bold experimentation with a variety of non-traditional mediums including smart materials, intelligent processes and emerging technologies. Students will engage in problem-solving strategies and agile learning to initiate, grow and propagate their ideas towards real-world implementation.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17202 • ^ Thu 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 342 – Fabrication Codes / Ngā Waehere Hei Waihanga

This course considers the relationship between digital creation - CAD (Computer Aided Design) and digital making/fabrication - CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing) and explores the design opportunities these technologies offer. Students will investigate a range of digital creation and manufacturing methods and produce designs that exploit these technologies.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 25156 • ^ Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

INDN 390 – Industrial Design Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa ā-Ahumahi

This course introduces branding as a business concept to students. It explores the role that a product and associated services play in promoting and developing a company’s brand as well as the way a brand impacts on the perception and value of a product. As a capstone course, it offers an opportunity to integrate all the design skills and knowledge students have acquired to explore customised and connected products in both corporate and cultural contexts. Projects are often undertaken in collaboration with industry partners.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371, INDN 211 (X) INDN 312

2/3 • CRN 32116 • ^ Mon, Thu 12.30-3pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 302 – Design for Experience II / Hoahoa kia Whai Wheako II

In this course students will become adept at user experience (UX) design techniques, such as: case study analysis, user interface design, rapid visualisation and prototyping. Students will also become skilled at using the industry standard tools and techniques of UX design.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including IXXN 201

2/3 • CRN 32119 • ^ Thu 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 311 – Design Psychology II / Mātai Hinengaro ā-Hoahoa II

Students will develop further skills to critically read psychology literature, find design opportunities and write design briefs based on psychology principles. Students will develop sophisticated designs based on those briefs and test them with advanced psychology methods that the students critically selected.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including IXXN 211 or DSDN 211

1/3 • CRN 33002 • Fri 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

IXXN 331 – Design Enterprise / Pakihi ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to a range of approaches for applying their interaction design skills in industry, from entrepreneurship to employability. The course includes research, literature reviews as well as studio work towards developing entrepreneurial skills.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

Not offered in 2024

IXXN 341 – Design for Health / Hoahoa kia Whai Hauora

This course introduces students to the wide range of opportunities for design to inform healthcare products and services. The course includes introduction to methods for working with clinicians and patients and how to design physical devices and digital interactions to address specific physiological requirements for a range of health conditions.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 30067 • Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

IXXN 390 – Interaction Design Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa ā-Pāhekoheko

This course facilitates the development of a major interaction design project that builds and expands on skills learned in the programme and individual interests of the students. Starting from seminar-style discussions, students will develop their own briefs that address an advanced interaction design problem, select appropriate methods for addressing it, develop a working design and test its efficacy in context.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371, IXXN 201

2/3 • CRN 32118 • ^ Tue 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 314 – Audio-Visual Space / Whaitua Ataata-Rongo

Students will investigate processes and strategies involved in the production of time-based media, including audio recording, editing and manipulation techniques. Revolving around the topic of audio-visual space, course projects will allow students to explore the psychology of perception and concepts of spatiality within audio and video design.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 19914 • ^ Mon, Fri 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 333 – Data Driven Design / Hoahoa Ānga ā-Raraunga

This course focuses on the interpretation and presentation of data. Datasets are combined with programming and scripting tools to provide context to our digitized information systems and databases. Students will work with data sources from science, the humanities and commerce to design solutions to real-world problems using data.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 142 and 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or from DATA/COMP courses

Not offered in 2024

MDDN 342 – Creative Coding and AI III / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga III

Creative Coding III builds on the content taught in Creative Coding I and II and extends the use of procedural and parameterised design strategies and AI tools. Students will be taught advanced computer graphics and data mapping techniques in order to create dynamic visuals and assets for use in screen-based media. AI tools use and prompt engineering will also be deployed to advance code design workflows.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including MDDN 242

1/3 • CRN 28190 • ^ Tue 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 345 – Photographics III / Ngā Whakaahuatanga III

Photography is explored to an advanced level as a creative process and design research tool. Building on previous technical and creative skills, students engage with multiple photographic genres and practices. An ongoing technical tool kit and theoretical understanding of photography is developed for use across multiple fields of design and research.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including MDDN 244 or DSDN 244

Not offered in 2024

MDDN 346 – Blockchains and Web3

'Blockchains and Web3' is a 6-week intensive course covering topics surrounding Blockchain technologies such as Smart Contracts, Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) and Distributed Autonomous Organisations (DAO). The course focuses on understanding design paradigms and delivering technical tuition in relation to fundamental theories of Blockchain, and its current and upcoming impact on our society.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts or permission of head of school

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 321 – Design Justice / Hoahoa o Te Nāianei

This course introduces students to the complex relations between design, people and the environment, and explores the notion of design justice, as a provocation for creating positive impact through design practice and of design practice. The course explores design ethics and responsibilities in relation to climate and environmental justice; indigenous justice; disability justice; social justice, through creative projects.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or GLBL 201

1/3 • CRN 32126 • ^ Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 333 – Design Ethnography II / Tā te Hoahoa Titiro II

Building on SIDN 233 Design Ethnography I, this course offers students the opportunity to further develop their cultural research skills through field observations, interviews, interpretations, and reflections. Students will create a personal research portfolio to support further study and/or professional activities.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including SIDN 233

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 352 – Whakapapa Design III / Hoahoa ā haere ake nei III

In this course students explore through their creative practice the rich stories/pūrākau and whakapapa of local communities and environments to establish meaningful connections (whakawhanaungatanga) and insights into both the diverse and unique needs of others. Engaging with Iwi, Hapū and community directly, students will be introduced to real-world issues. This immersive experience aims to instil in students a deep sense of responsibility as kaitiaki, or guardians, of both the stories and the spaces they call home—both in the present and for generations to come.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including DSDN 242 or SIDN 242

Not offered in 2024

SIDN 372 – Service Design / Hoahoa ā-Ratonga

In this course students consider the transitional changes required to achieve shifts in social infrastructure, existing paradigms and organisational networks and pipelines. Students create and articulate sustainable pipelines and systems that acknowledge the health and well-being of both humans and nature.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or GLBL 201

2/3 • CRN 32124 • ^ Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

SIDN 390 – Design for Social Innovation Capstone / Whakatinana ā-Wheako

Within Agents of Change students create solutions that can impact positive social, cultural, political, economic and/or environmental change. Students use design tools, research methodologies and emergent co- design practices to design prototypes, and communicate and analyse design interventions that offer transitional pathways towards positive change. Students engage with diverse guiding values, including mana and manaaki, (respect and care) alongside whakawhanaungatanga (generation of authentic connections), to impact social awareness and/or change.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371 and 60 200-level pts including DSDN 242 or SIDN 242 and SIDN 272

2/3 • CRN 32122 • ^ Mon, Thu 3.30-6pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Earth Sciences

ESCI 111 – The Earth System: Understanding our Dynamic Earth and Environment

ESCI 111 introduces students to the Earth system. It covers the physical processes that shape the Earth and environment. It emphasises how humans interact with the environment, especially around key issues such as climate change and sea level rise, natural hazards and resource use. It provides a platform for further study in Geography, Earth and Environmental sciences and includes fieldwork in the Wellington Region.

15 pts • (X) GEOG 111 (D) GEOG 111

1/3 • CRN 9469 • Mon, Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 112 – Earth Science for a Changing Planet

ESCI 112 teaches the foundations of Earth Science, necessary for understanding and mitigating climate change and natural hazards, including sea-level rise, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In addition, the course covers environmentally responsible management of natural resources such as groundwater and minerals. As part of the course, students go into the field and develop practical skills to better understand and interpret their physical environment.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 15147 • Mon, Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 132 – Antarctica: Unfreezing the Continent

A broad introduction to Antarctica, including its history, exploration, weather, geology, fauna and management. Its role in the global climate system is emphasised. This course is primarily designed for non-science majors.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 9062 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 201 – Climate Change and New Zealand's Future

The Antarctic Research Centre is offering this summer course. Designed for science and non-science students, this course provides a summary of current knowledge on climate change, the evidence and its uncertainties, and possible climate scenarios for the next 50 to 100 years. The course also discusses the influence of climate change on NZ’s society, economy and environment, and governmental strategies for adaptation and mitigation.

20 pts • (P) 30 points

3/3 • CRN 11341 • Wed 9-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ESCI 202 – Sedimentology and Palaeontology

An introduction to features of sedimentary strata and fossils that form the basis for interpreting the geological history of a region from field observations and drill cores. The course includes flow channel studies of sediment movement in the laboratory, and a weekend field trip to gain experience in describing sedimentary strata and collecting fossils for subsequent study.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent

1/3 • CRN 15137 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 203 – Earth Structures and Deformation

An introduction to the fields of structural geology, tectonics and solid earth geophysics with the goal of describing the structure of the earth and the mechanisms by which it deforms. The laboratory component emphasises modern field-based methods of collecting, processing and analysing geological and geophysical data.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent

1/3 • CRN 15141 • Mon, Wed 10-1pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 204 – Petrology and Microscopy

This course examines all common major rock types and introduces crystallography as it pertains to optical mineralogy, with examples of a variety of common minerals and rocks in hand sample and under the microscope. The course covers the origins of common minerals and rocks and the conditions and processes that form them.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent

2/3 • CRN 15138 • Tue, Fri 9-12 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 241 – Introductory Field Geology

An introduction to field techniques in geology held at the Geology department's field station at Onekaka, near Takaka, Northwest Nelson. The course trains students in basic methods of geological field mapping and provides training and experience in the presentation of geological field data through the construction of geological maps, stratigraphic columns and geological cross-sections. Students gain experience at describing and interpreting a wide variety of rock types and geological features in individual outcrops. Students will gain practice in interpreting the geological history of an area from their observations. Note the details of dates and arrangements in the Course Content below.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 111, 112; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent

block dates/3 • CRN 17287 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 301 – Global Change: Earth Processes and History

A study of modern and past Earth environments and the key processes that have shaped them. This course focuses on understanding and interpreting evidence from the geological record for environmental change and using this knowledge to help predict future variability, with specific focus on Antarctica, Southwest Pacific and New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 202; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 15139 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 302 – Tectonics and Structural Geology

An introduction to the fundamental concepts, principles and methods in global tectonics and structural geology. The laboratory part of the course emphasises practical methods of structural analysis and interpretation based on outcrop, rock mechanics, geophysical, and remote sensing data sets. It includes two all-day field trips.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 203; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 15145 • Tue, Thu 3-6pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

ESCI 303 – Petrology and Geochemistry

The course introduces fundamental concepts, principles and methods in geochemistry and the application of geochemical tools to geochronology, igneous, metamorphic rocks and processes. The formation, classification and geochemical behaviour of elements, isotopes and anaylytical methods in geochemistry. The application of geochemical tools is examined and the principles of geochronology applied.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 204; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-112, STAT 193)

Not offered in 2024

ESCI 305 – Environmental and Applied Geophysics

This course covers geophysical techniques to explore the subsurface, with applications to engineering, environmental and groundwater monitoring, seismic hazard assessment, exploration for energy and mineral resources, and other aspects of Earth structure. Topics include gravity, seismic, electrical, magnetic, and satellite-based surveying methods.

20 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, SPCE 201, STAT 193)

1/3 • CRN 15146 • ^ Mon, Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 12-4pm [Kelburn]

lab tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 341 – Sedimentary Field Geology

Field sedimentary mapping in the hills east of Martinborough, covering the basics of mapping sedimentary sequences in an area of simple deformation. A map, cross- section and stratigraphic columns are prepared and an environmental analysis of the section is produced in the field. Note the details of dates and arrangements in the Course Content below.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 241; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-112, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 15144 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 342 – Structural Field Geology

In this course, you will learn to recognise and describe active faults in the field. You will gain the ability to distinguish between ancient and active geological structures, gather and analyse structural data, quantify fault slip rates, and perform a natural hazard risk assessment.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 202, 203, 241; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 15142 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 343 – Volcanic Field Geology

Methods and techniques for studying volcanic geology in the field. This course runs from Whakapapa in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) of the central North Island. It examines the products of andesite and basalt eruptions from the Tongariro National Park volcanoes and some rhyolitic products of Taupo volcano.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 204, 241; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193) (X) ESCI 340

block dates/3 • CRN 17289 • ^ [Kelburn]

lab, tut tba

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 344 – Field Geophysics

Methods and techniques for field geophysical surveys. This block course runs over a week, usually during the mid-trimester break, in a part of New Zealand that may vary from year to year. Students will learn how to apply several different techniques of environmental and geophysical methods to a single area and to integrate the results to answer a geophysical problem such as the shallow structure of a fault or a basin.

10 pts • (P) ESCI 112 or 203; 15 points from ENGR 121-142 or any 100-level MATH, PHYS, QUAN or STAT or approved equivalent; 15 further pts from (CHEM 113-122, ENGR 121-123, MATH 141-177, PHYS 101-131, PHYS 142-145, QUAN 102-111, STAT 193) (C) ESCI 305

block dates/3 • CRN 17288 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ESCI 349 – Earth Sciences – International Field Course

This international field course in earth sciences aims to examine key geographical, geological and/or geophysical localities. The course will offer a variable but unique insight, understanding and experience of earth science in the field beyond that which already exists in New Zealand. This course is offered in alternate years and will run in the USA from 18 November 2019 to 18 December 2019. Numbers are limited, apply by 1 April 2019. An extra fee beyond that for the course, covering travel and subsistence costs applies and is to be met by the student.

20 pts • (P) 60 points of 200-level ESCI or GEOG including either ESCI 241 or GEOG 223; (X) ESCI 449

Not offered in 2024

Econometrics

See also Economics

QUAN 102 – Introductory Applied Statistics for Business

An introduction to applied statistics in a business, government and social context. Topics include data management, sampling, graphing, one- and two-variable summary statistics, linear regression, basic probability theory and applications to the binomial and normal distributions, confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing in a range of scenarios. Microsoft Excel and iNZight will be the primary tools throughout the course.

15 pts • (X) MATH 277, STAT 193

2/3 • CRN 1482 • (L1) Mon, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 5010 • (L3) Mon, Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 32186 • Tue, Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

QUAN 111 – Mathematics for Economics and Finance

Mathematical methods appropriate for study of economics and finance. After refreshing basic mathematical knowledge, the course covers systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, functions, calculus of functions of one of several variables (differentiation and optimisation). Applications include using functional approximations, calculating marginal utility and marginal cost, solving profit/utility maximisation problems. Note: QUAN 111, CRN 15973 is for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts • (X) MATH 141/142 and 151

1/3 • CRN 6107 • (L1) Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 6469 • tba [Kelburn]

tut tba

QUAN 201 – Introduction to Econometrics

The course focuses on the estimation and interpretation of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models. The OLS assumptions and their implications are discussed. The methods learned are applied to real data.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 (or MATH 141/142, 151);

1/3 • CRN 1483 • Wed 3.30-5.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

QUAN 202 – Business and Economic Forecasting

Basic concepts of forecasting; smoothing and seasonal adjustment, forecasting via adaptive procedures, ARIMA models, and the use of explanatory variables, the evaluation and combination of forecasts. Computer software is used to illustrate all aspects of the course.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

Not offered in 2024

QUAN 203 – Mathematical Statistics for Economics and Finance

Analysis of discrete, continuous, conditional and independent random variables, including mean, variance, covariance, moment generating function, limit behaviour and other properties. Estimation techniques including multiple regression, method of moments, and maximum likelihood. General strengthening of mathematical thinking algebraic skills, calculus and linear algebra.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151); (X) MATH 277

2/3 • CRN 13095 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

Economics

ECON 130 – Microeconomic Principles

An introduction to economic principles and their application to issues facing households, businesses and government in the New Zealand economy and the international economic environment. Note: CRNs 17450 and 15517 are for Vietnam-based students only.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 8721 • (L5) Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 10036 • (L3) Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 8827 • Mon, Fri 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea], Wed 1.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 141 – Macroeconomic Principles

An introduction to macroeconomics, including fiscal and monetary policies, the international sector, and analysis of income-expenditure, IS-MPR and aggregate demand-aggregate supply models.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 27005 • (L1) Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

ECON 201 – Intermediate Microeconomics

This course in intermediate microeconomic analysis includes demand theory and applications of consumer behaviour, analysis of market structures, strategic behaviour, introductory welfare economics and analysis of public goods and externalities.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130; QUAN 111 (or MATH 141/142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 1194 • Mon 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea], Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 202 – Open-economy Macroeconomics

Applications of an open economy macroeconomic model to macroeconomic issues and policy, including the interdependence of macroeconomic activity and markets, the roles of expectations variables and other dynamic adjustment mechanisms, the significance of international events, exchange rate regimes, inflation, unemployment.

15 pts • (P) ECON 141 (or 140)

2/3 • CRN 1196 • Wed, Fri 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 301 – Econometrics

Econometric theories with simulation and real-world data application including: ordinary least squares (with matrix algebra); generalised least squares; instrumental variables estimation; maximum likelihood estimation; binary response and limited dependent variables models; panel data models.

15 pts • (P) QUAN 201

2/3 • CRN 18060 • Mon 11.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

ECON 303 – Applied Econometrics

This course is about carefully answering economic questions with data. Various classical and contemporary econometric techniques are presented and applied using econometric software to real and synthetic data, from realms such as education, health and the labour market.

15 pts • (P) QUAN 201

1/3 • CRN 18061 • Mon 9.30-11.30 [Pipitea]

ECON 305 – Advanced Macroeconomics

Causes and consequences of Economic Growth, viewed both narrowly in terms of GDP, and more broadly in terms of the progress of societies. The roles of monetary and fiscal policy in shaping Macroeconomic outcomes. Individual, in-depth anlysis of these issues for a selected economy.

15 pts • (P) ECON 202, QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 1203 • Tue 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 307 – Economic Policy

Economic policy addresses a broad range of factors: the role of the state; the interplay of market failure and government failure; and how policy instruments are used to affect outcomes. The course covers all of these and has a specific focus on taxation, social security, and education with examples from Aotearoa New Zealand and abroad.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201 or (ECON 130 and one of PUBL 203/209); (X) PUBL 303

Not offered in 2024

ECON 314 – Game Theory

This course introduces and develops game theory and its applications.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201

Not offered in 2024

ECON 328 – Industrial Organisation

Economic theory combines with empirical evidence in the study of the organisation of firms, industries and markets. The course draws on game theory, transaction cost analysis, information theory and the application of economics to legal issues.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201; (X) ECON 211

2/3 • CRN 32047 • Mon, Wed 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

ECON 330 – Law and Economics

An introduction to the economic analysis of law and legal institutions. The course covers issues in the economic analysis of tort law, property law, contract law, criminal law, litigation and settlement, as well as corporate and antitrust law.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 15 pts from (COML/ECON 201-299 or LAWS 201-289); (X) LAWS 335

2/3 • CRN 7717 • Thu 11.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 333 – Labour Economics

This course covers both economic theories and real-world data analysis of the labour market with the following topics: causal inference, labour supply, labour demand, market equilibrium, immigration, and human capital accumulation.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201; QUAN 102 or MATH 177 or STAT 193

1/3 • CRN 1213 • Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Pipitea]

tut tba

ECON 339 – Information Economics

The economics of information and incentives. Topics covered include efficiency; complete and incomplete verifiability; uncertainty, expected utility and insurance, moral hazard; selection, screening and lemons; auctions.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201

Not offered in 2024

ECON 340 – Environmental and Resource Economics

This course provides economic background to topical questions in environmental and resource economics Economic methods (eg cost-benefit analysis and static/dynamic efficiency) are applied to economics of pollution control (eg climate change), depletable and and renewable resources. Inefficiencies (externalities, market power, property rights) in various resource markets (oil, electricity, fisheries, water, land) are discussed.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201

Not offered in 2024

ECON 342 – Development Economics

Why are some countries rich while others are poor? How can less affluent countries catch up? This course aims to address these critical questions in economics. By building upon fundamental economic theories, the course guides you through an exploration of diverse empirical facts related to economic growth and development. Additionally, it provides you with analytical tools to assess development policies effectively.

15 pts • (P) ECON 201, 202; (X) ECON 350 in 2017-2023

2/3 • CRN 36095 • Mon, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

ECON 361 – Disasters and Economic Policy

The economic aspects of disaster management and policy, including these topics: the economic history of natural disasters; the research literature on the economics of natural disasters; poverty and vulnerability, insurance, risk transfer, cost benefit of mitigation, and other related topics.

15 pts

Not offered in 2024

Education

EDUC 101 – Education, Society and Culture

This interdisciplinary course is an introduction to the relationship between education, society and change. It analyses the ways in which political and cultural beliefs influence children’s and young people’s experiences of education in multiple settings with a particular focus on Aotearoa New Zealand and the Oceania region.

20 pts • (X) EPOL 181, FEDU 101, KURA 101

1/3 • CRN 28205 • Tue 12-2pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 102 – Te Ao Hurihuri 1: Te Tiriti—History and transformative education

This course introduces the historical context for education in Aotearoa, beginning with pre-colonial Māori tikanga, the early contact period, He Whakaputanga, Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the impacts of colonisation since 1840. It includes examples of Māori resistance to Tiriti breaches and an overview of Waitangi Tribunal findings, with a focus on the implications for transformative education, including ecological justice, in contemporary and local education contexts.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 33456 • Thu 12-2pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 103 – Te Ao Hurihuri 2: Ngā Auahatanga—Innovations in Care and Education

This course provides students with an opportunity to interrogate the genealogies of indigenous and Western models of childrearing and the intergenerational transmission of languages, values and knowledges, including a view of play and playfulness. Students engage in in-depth exploration, comparison and critique of historical and contemporary contexts for early childhood philosophies and programmes, with a focus on Indigenous models (such as Kōhanga Reo, Aoga Amata, Punanga Reo and Punana Leo) and key Western pedagogical innovations and influences (such as is seen in the work of John Dewey, Frederick Froebel, Rudolph Steiner, Maria Montessori, and the MacMillan sisters).

20 pts • (X) EDUC 115

2/3 • CRN 33457 • Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

EDUC 104 – Te Ao Hurihuri 3: Ngā Ariā—Theories of growth and learning in context

This course offers an introduction to, and a critical analysis of, historical and contemporary theories of learning, growth and transformation across the lifespan, with a particular focus on young children and their education. The course examines theories informed by Māori, Pacific and other Indigenous world views as well as key Western theories of learning and development.

20 pts • (X) EDUC 116

2/3 • CRN 33458 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 115 – The Discovery of Early Childhood

An introduction to the history and philosophies underpinning early childhood care and education in Europe, the United States and New Zealand from the 18th century to the present day.

15 pts • (X) EPOL 113

Not offered in 2024

EDUC 116 – Understanding Young Children

An introduction to past and present theories of child development with a particular focus on understanding the theoretical context out of which contemporary understandings of how young children learn and develop have emerged.

15 pts • (X) EPSY 113

Not offered in 2024

EDUC 117 – Motivation and Grit

Why do you do the things you do? Why are some activities more effective than others in trying to achieve goals? What is grit and how does it relate to motivation? This course will address all of these questions and will help students understand what affects peoples’ motivation. This course is taught online.

20 pts

3/3 • CRN 29044 • tba [Distance]

EDUC 136 – Professional knowledge for Mathematics Education

How do children learn mathematics and how can teachers promote mathematical learning and thinking? This course explores specialised content knowledge; a knowledge of mathematical concepts essential for the effective teaching of mathematics. Learning will be based around the pedagogies promoted in New Zealand curriculum documents. This course is particularly relevant for students considering enrolling in a teaching qualification upon completion of their undergraduate degree.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 30048 • Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 141 – Human Development and Learning

This course takes a lifespan approach to examining how people develop and learn from birth to death. It explores key milestones and changes in physical, cognitive, emotional and social development; and critically examines a range of factors and contexts that shape development and learning.

20 pts • (X) EPSY 141, FEDU 101

1/3 • CRN 28197 • Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 28198 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EDUC 191 – Special Topic: Introduction to Academic Studies

An introduction to the skills and dispositions necessary for success in degree programmes at Victoria University of Wellington, including academic writing, critical thinking, resilience and sound study techniques and strategies.

25 pts

1/3 • CRN 33417 • [Kelburn]

EDUC 192 – Special Topic: Introduction to Academic Studies

An introduction to the skills and dispositions necessary for success in degree programmes at Victoria University of Wellington, including academic writing,  critical thinking, psychological factors in learning and  sound study techniques and strategies.

20 pts • (X) EDUC 191

1/3 • CRN 36129 • [Kelburn]

TCHG 102 – Te Reo Māori 1: Hei Whaiora

In this course, student teachers are introduced to te reo Māori me ōna tikanga in relation to the conceptual framework that underpins Te Whāriki, including the place of tākaro, or play, in te ao Māori.

15 pts • (X) TCHG 118

part year/3 • CRN 33465 • Fri 12-2pm [Kelburn]

TCHG 103 – Ako 1: Ngā Anga—Care and education frameworks and pedagogies

This course introduces you to practice frameworks taught across the programme, including professionalism, ethical practice and reflective practice. We examine the Teaching Council of Aotearoa New Zealand’s Code and Standards, the EC regulatory framework, and professional guidelines such as Tātaiako and Tapasā. We focus on notions of wellbeing, belonging, diversity, cultural sustainability and inclusivity.

15 pts • (C) TCHG 102, TCHG 104, EDUC 102 (X) TCHG 116

part year/3 • CRN 33459 • Thu 9-11 [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

TCHG 104 – Tātaimarau 1: Te Whāriki

In this course, student teachers critically examine notions of curriculum and pedagogical practices in early childhood care and education settings in Aotearoa New Zealand, focussing on wellbeing, learning and growing through play and exploration. They build understandings of social, cultural, and ecological justice in relation to curriculum, play pedagogies and inclusive education. Māori and Pacific Peoples’ ontologies and theoretical perspectives and children’s diverse life-worlds are a focus.

15 pts • (X) TCHG 111

part year/3 • CRN 33460 • Fri 9-11 [Kelburn]

TCHG 105 – Tātaimarau me Te Reo Māori 2: Kia Rere—The '100' Languages of Children

Students will explore introductory notions of creativity including Māori, Pacific Peoples and Western conceptualisations. They enhance their own creative skills and attitudes by exploring languages, literacy, visual art, music, dance, drama, science, maths and technology. They develop enriched understandings of design for programme planning and learning environments, which integrate digital learning, a sustainability focus, and transformative approaches. The course incorporates a te reo Māori language component congruent with the level acquired in TCHG 102: Te Reo Māori 1 that builds on earlier te reo learning and uses a corpus of language appropriate to working in these curriculum domains.

20 pts • (P) TCHG 102, TCHG 104

2/3 • CRN 33461 • Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 211 – Educational Neuroscience

This course will examine the neural mechanisms of learning and its implications for educational practices. Topics related to individual differences in abilities and translating research into classroom practices will be explored. Students will gain an introductory understanding of neuropsychological properties of learning that will help them further develop their training in Educational Psychology.

20 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 141, PSYC 121, 122) (X) EDUC 289 (2021, 2022)

3/3 • CRN 35043 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-2pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 215 – The Early Years Debates

This course explores current early years issues and debates in both local and international contexts. It offers opportunities to consider and critique a variety of arenas and strategies for equitable education in the early childhood years.

20 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 101,115, 116 or 142) (X) EPOL 215

1/3 • CRN 28024 • Mon 2-5pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 221 – Youth, Society and Education

This course examines the ways in which young people create meaning in their lives and in their school environments. It explores the influences that shape their understandings of the world and their experiences of being young in a rapidly changing society.

20 pts • (P) 20, 100 level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA/SOSC pts; (X) EPOL 281

1/3 • CRN 28199 • Fri 11-1pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 222 – Educational Inquiry

This course provides an introducation to key concepts, processes and methodological approaches to educational research. The emphasis of the course is on building research literacy and developing basic research skills.

20 pts • (P) 20 EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA pts

Not offered in 2024

EDUC 223 – Education, Ethnicity and Culture

An examination of the underlying concepts in indigenous education and the theories that inform current research practice. Particular emphasis is given to theories of ethnicity, culture, indigeneity and colonisation and their application to the New Zealand context.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level EDUC/EPSY/EPOL/FEDU/KURA/MAOR/PASI pts; (X) KURA 242

2/3 • CRN 28201 • Mon 12-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 224 – Pacific Nations Education

The course examines concepts, issues and trends in Pacific Nations Education with particular reference to the education of Pacific peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand and indigenous education systems in the Pacific.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/FEDU/KURA/MAOR/PASI pts; (X) PASP 102

2/3 • CRN 28206 • Tue 10-12 [Kelburn]

EDUC 243 – Learning and Motivation

This course examines psychological principles of learning and motivation in educational contexts. Key theories and evidence on learning and motivation are evaluated. This course helps students acquire evidence-based strategies for long-term retention of important information and develop their ability to use newly learned knowledge within educational settings and beyond. In addition, the course builds students' understanding of motivation processes that play important roles in learning and equips students with a toolkit of effective strategies to manage their motivation in learning settings.

20 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 116, 141, EPSY 113, 141, PSYC 121, 122); (X) EPSY 243

2/3 • CRN 28202 • Tue 2-5pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 244 – Issues in Child and Adolescent Development

This course examines child and adolescent development within an applied developmental psychology framework. Key theories and evidence on a range of issues and challenges that influence child and adolescent development is evaluated.

20 pts • (P) one of (EDUC 116, 141, EPSY 113, 141, PSYC 121, 122); (X) EPSY 244

1/3 • CRN 28203 • Wed 9-11 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

TCHG 220 – Ako 2: Te Tirohanga Whānui - Approaches to EC curriculum, assessment and planning

In this course, student teachers examine theories and practices for curriculum, assessment and planning, including kaupapa Māori and Pacific Peoples’ perspectives. They use multiple approaches and tools to gather information and reflect on children’s diverse ways of being, knowing, doing and relating, to plan for individual children. Student teachers examine how interpersonal, temporal and material environments influence children’s curriculum experiences and engagement. Attention is paid to culturally responsive and sustaining pedagogical practices that support kaiako/teachers’ attunement to children and their whānau, hapū and iwi. Campus-based student teachers will participate in five weeks of external teaching experience. Centre-based student teachers will participate in four weeks of in-centre teaching experience.

20 pts • (P) TCHG103, 104 (X) TCHG117

1/3 • CRN 34023 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

TCHG 221 – Ako me Te Reo Māori 3: Kia Tika - Being a kaiako with infants, toddlers and their whanau

This course supports student teachers to work effectively with infants, toddlers and their whānau in culturally and linguistically responsive ways, using different philosophical and pedagogical approaches, including indigenous Māori and Pacific constructs such as tuakana-teina, manaakitanga, and inati, pakiwaitara and oriori. Student teachers reflect critically on their own identity and culture/s and how these impact on their role as kaiako supporting children’s wellbeing. The interpersonal, temporal, and material environment in relation to play-based/tākaro curriculum experiences and pedagogy with the youngest children is addressed. The course incorporates an intermediate course in te reo Māori me ōna tikanga, Kia Tika.

20 pts • (P) TCHG103, 105, EDUC104 (X) TCHG114

1/3 • CRN 34024 • Mon 1-3pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn]

TCHG 222 – Tātaimarau 3: Ngā Torohanga—Modalities for understanding lifeworlds

In this course, student teachers critically examine effective practices for teaching mathematics, science, technology and languages to infants, toddlers and young children. They intentionally draw on pedagogical practices to enhance infants, toddlers and young children’s creativity, expression, experimentation, thinking and problem-solving as they relate to these learning areas. They consider the social, cultural, and sustainability values that underpin their teaching and professional behaviours in these domains and their understanding of assessment practices. Student teachers also learn domain specific vocabulary in te reo Māori and other Pacific languages.

20 pts • (P) TCHG105 (X) TCHG211, 213

1/3 • CRN 34025 • Mon 10-12 [Kelburn], Tue 9-10 [Kelburn]

TCHG 223 – Te Ao Hurihuri me Te Reo Māori 4: Kia Māori—Inclusive teaching in diverse communities

In this course, student teachers explore specificities and commonalities across cultural communities. They develop a nuanced and critical understanding of their responsibilities, and pedagogical strategies, with regard to delivering programmes that are inclusive of and responsive to a wide range of social, cultural and linguistic diversities. This course incorporates an intermediate course in te reo Māori me ōna tikanga, Kia Māori.

20 pts • (P) TCHG221 (X) TCHG217

2/3 • CRN 34026 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

TCHG 224 – Ako 4: Kia Mataara—Intentional pedagogies in local contexts

In this course, student teachers examine how intentional pedagogical practices can support young children’s social and emotional growth, competence and sense of belonging and wellbeing. Video is used as a reflective tool to support student teachers’ intentional teaching practices. They also examine how cultural, family/whānau and community contexts frame children’s social and emotional wellbeing, teachers’ pedagogy and the development of local curriculum, including for children with additional learning needs. The course includes a six-week teaching experience with a particular focus on student teachers working collaboratively with members of the teaching team, children, parents and whānau to enact local curriculum consistent with Mātauranga a iwi.

20 pts • (P) TCHG220 (C) TCHG 223, TCHG 225 (X) TCHG216

part year/3 • CRN 34027 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

TCHG 225 – Tātaimarau 4: Ngā Toi—Exploring modes of creativity and expression

In this course, student teachers critically examine effective practices for teaching oral and written literacy, dance and movement, music, drama and visual arts relevant to the diverse life-worlds of infants, toddlers and young children. They intentionally draw on pedagogical practices to enhance infants, toddlers and young children’s creativity, expression, experimentation, thinking and problem-solving as they relate to these learning areas. They consider the social, cultural, and sustainability values that underpin their teaching, professional behaviours and assessment practices in these domains. Student teachers also learn domain specific vocabulary in te reo Māori and other languages.

20 pts • (P) TCHG105 (X) TCHG211

2/3 • CRN 34028 • Mon 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 311 – Ethics of Educational Neuroscience

This course will examine the ethical implications of neurophysiological interventions related to the education of students. Case studies and ethical frameworks will be used to assess the potential benefits and limitations of techniques such as neuroimaging, neuropharmacology and neurostimulation. The course format will encourage in-class discussion and promote critical thinking about the current and future impact of neuroscience on pedagogical practices.

20 pts • (P) 40 200 level pts, including one of (EDUC 211, 243, 244)

2/3 • CRN 35044 • Mon 2-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 315 – Te Ao Hurihuri 6: Kia hurihia— Advocacy with children and communities

This course provides students with the theoretical, contextual and strategic knowledge and skills that will equip them to advocate for the early childhood profession, young children and diverse families and communities. Students critique community, national and international levels of policy, frameworks and practices relevant to advocacy with and for children, families, communities, non-governmental organisations and professions. Te Tiriti o Waitangi provides an underpinning framework for the advocacy models to be developed in the course.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 200 level

2/3 • CRN 35056 • Tue 9-11 [Kelburn]

EDUC 321 – Education Policy and Practice

This course examines contemporary education policy and the politics and debates surrounding how policy is developed and put into practice. These debates are used to shed light on the relationship between globalising processes, the State, education and individuals.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level EDUC pts;

1/3 • CRN 28204 • Wed 2-5pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 322 – Multi-ethnic Education

This course examines concepts, issues and trends in multi-ethnic education.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/KURA/ANTH/HIST MAOR/POLS/SOSC pts; (X) KURA 341

1/3 • CRN 28208 • Mon 10-12 [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 323 – Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Education Aotearoa

This course will investigate the drive by various indigenous groups to be more self-determining through education. An interdisciplinary focus is taken. The course will discuss contemporary themes such as indigenous identities, the impact of globalisation and the self-determination of indigenous peoples.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including 20 EDUC/EPOL/EPSY/KURA pts; (X) KURA 342

2/3 • CRN 28209 • Wed 9-12 [Kelburn]

EDUC 341 – Learning Environments

In this course we explore several key questions. How do we regulate, that is, manage, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviours to reach our goals in formal and informal learning environments? What types of goals should we set in learning environments and how should we pursue them to optimally learn and achieve? How can we strengthen our self-control, that is, our ability to circumvent temptations and resist impulses that negatively influence our engagement in learning environments? In answering these questions, the course helps students understand theory and research evidence and formulate strategies that support effective self-regulation and self-control in learning environments.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level pts including 20 approved EDUC/EPSY/KURA pts; (X) EPSY 341

1/3 • CRN 28210 • Fri 1-4pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 342 – Supporting Diverse Ākonga/Learners

This course examines psychological and educational aspects of supporting diverse learners, including neurodivergent learners and those with physical and health needs. There is a focus on evidence-based practices and considerations of support needs across contexts.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including one of EDUC 211, 243, 244; EPSY 243, 244); (X) EPSY 342

2/3 • CRN 28211 • Tue 2-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

EDUC 343 – Youth and Life Challenges

This course takes a developmental and psychological approach to examining the factors and contexts that impact on the development, risk, resilience and wellbeing of young people during adolescence and emerging adulthood. It also focuses on young people’s experiences of life challenges and the role of education in prevention, intervention and supporting youth.

20 pts • (P) 40, 200 level pts including one of EDUC 211, 243, 244, EPSY 243, 244); (X) EPSY 343

2/3 • CRN 28212 • Mon 11-1pm [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

Educational Psychology

PSYC 121 – Foundations in Psychology 1

PSYC 121 introduces core concepts in psychology with a focus on research methods, social psychology, social development, and mental health. Students will consider how psychology can be used in applied contexts and the importance of bicultural and cross-cultural perspectives in our understanding of human behaviour. In lectures, students will learn about Māori models of mental health and in lectures and labs they will have the opportunity to reflect upon the principles that underpin Kaupapa Māori research. Students will develop skills that form the foundation for subsequent psychology courses, such as analysing data, learning how to read journal articles and developing an understanding of how psychological researchers convey research findings through writing laboratory reports.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 1421 • (L1) Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

1/3 • CRN 4692 • (L2) Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn]

PSYC 122 – Foundations in Psychology 2

PSYC 122 introduces students to theory and research in the biological basis of behaviour, learning and memory, cognition and perception, and applied psychology in the context of Aotearoa. In the lab programme, students develop skills that form the foundation for subsequent psychology courses, such as analysing data, learning how to read journal articles and developing an understanding of how psychological researchers convey research findings through writing laboratory reports.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 4056 • (L2) Wed 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 28006 • (L3) Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

PSYC 232 – Survey and Naturalistic Research Methods

Psychology researchers need to be able to collect and analyse data about people’s behaviours and beliefs in everyday life. In this course, students will learn how to design surveys and apply observational and qualitative methods to collect data. Students will learn how to develop research questions, design a questionnaire, conduct appropriate statistical analyses, and communicate findings in a scientific research report.

15 pts • (P) PSYC 121 or 122; STAT 193 (or MATH 177 or QUAN 102); (X) PSYC 325

1/3 • CRN 7543 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

Electrical & Electronic Engineering

COMP 103 – Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms

This course focuses on the techniques for designing, building and analysing computer programs that deal with large collections of data. The course addresses techniques for programming with collections of data, and the data structures and algorithms needed to implement these collections. The course expands programming skills and provides an understanding of the principles of data abstraction, algorithm design, and the analysis of algorithms fundamental to computer science.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112

2/3 • CRN 945 • Mon, Wed 5-6pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 7223 • [Kelburn]

lab tba

ENGR 121 – Engineering Mathematics Foundations

An introduction to the range of mathematical techniques employed by engineers, including functions, calculus, linear algebra, vector geometry, set theory, logic and probability. This course emphasises engineering applications and modelling.

15 pts • (P) (16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132 (X) Any pair (MATH 141/QUAN 111, MATH 151/161/177)

1/3 • CRN 26052 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 31158 • Mon, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 122 – Engineering Mathematics with Calculus

Further mathematical techniques employed by electrical and electronic engineers, with a focus on methods of calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. There is an emphasis on engineering applications and use of software.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 or MATH 141; (X) the pair (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 26053 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 141 – Engineering Science

ENGR 141 deals with scientific topics relevant to Engineering. Topics will include forms and use of energy, Newton’s laws of motion, gravity, waves, thermodynamics and required math concepts (limits, derivatives, functions). Students will obtain an appreciation for quantitative scientific reasoning and the role of fundamental physical laws in governing human energy use.

15 pts • (P) (16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132 (X) PHYS 101, PHYS 114, PHYS 115

1/3 • CRN 30094 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGR 142 – Engineering Physics for Electronics and Computer Systems

Physics theory and practice relevant to electronics and computer systems engineering. Topics covered will include electrostatics (charge, force, field, potential), magnetic field and force, DC and AC circuits, electromagnetic induction and other selected topics. Lectures, assignments and laboratory work will all focus on the application of physics to engineering situations.

15 pts • (P) either ENGR 141 and (ENGR 121 or MATH 141) or approved levels of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Physics and Calculus or equivalent (X) PHYS 115, 142

2/3 • CRN 27045 • Mon, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn]

MATH 142 – Calculus 1B

Integration looks at summing continuous variables, providing a way to define and compute areas and volumes, which are essential for many applications. This course develops integral calculus, including the view of integration as anti-differentiation, leading to the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Sequences and series are introduced, and functions are approximated using their Taylor polynomials. Techniques of integration are developed, including substitution and integration by parts. Differential equations are introduced, many of which arise from physical systems, and the course also introduces basic methods for solving them.

15 pts • (P) MATH 141 or QUAN 111 or PHYS 101 or approved level of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Calculus or an equivalent background in mathematics.

2/3 • CRN 17160 • Mon, Wed, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

MATH 151 – Algebra

Linear algebra is central to mathematics, and essential in science and engineering. This course introduces linear algebra, motivated by some of these applications, and maintaining a practical approach using fundamental mathematical objects such as matrices and vectors. Methods to solve systems of linear equations using matrices are introduced, as are eigenvectors, which can be used to characterise matrices amongst many other applications. The concept of an algebraic structure is introduced, as are complex numbers, which allow the solution of many equations that did not previously have solutions.

15 pts • (P) 16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132

1/3 • CRN 17161 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

EEEN 201 – Mechatronic Design and Prototyping

This course will equip students with a basic understanding of mechanical theory and the skills of electronic and mechanical design and construction so that they can successfully design and complete a moderately complex project. A presentation of this project work forms an integral part of the course.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112; ENGR 101, 110; ENGR 121 or MATH 141 or equivalent; (X) ECEN 201

2/3 • CRN 33053 • Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 202 – Digital Electronics and Microprocessors

An introduction to the design and construction of digital electronic instruments. Following a review of binary arithmetic and Boolean algebra, the course will focus on the design of digital circuits using both combinatorial and sequential logic. Further work will study microprocessor architectures, programming and interfacing and the conversions of digital and analogue signals.

15 pts • (P) one of (COMP 102, 112, ENGR 101, 121, MATH 161) (X) ECEN 202

1/3 • CRN 33054 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 203 – Circuit Analysis

This course covers the analysis of analogue electrical and electronic circuits. Topics covered include basic circuit theorems, operational amplifier circuits, the use of phasors for AC circuit analysis and the Laplace transform for switched systems. The use of computational and measurement tools for circuit characterisation is also covered.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 122 or MATH 142); (ENGR 142 or PHYS 142 or 115); (X) ECEN 203

1/3 • CRN 33055 • Tue, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

EEEN 204 – Electronic Devices

This course introduces fundamental electronic devices and their circuit applications. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals, diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers and the operation and application of special function diodes such as light emitting diodes and solar cells. Prototyping and testing of practical circuits using these electronic devices will be addressed in the laboratory sessions.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 122 or MATH 142); (ENGR 142 or PHYS 142 or 115); (X) ECEN 204

2/3 • CRN 33056 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EEEN 220 – Signals, Systems and Statistics 1

The course introduces analysis techniques for signals and linear time-invariant systems as well as fundamentals of engineering statistics. The first part of the course focuses on continuous time signals and systems and Fourier transform techniques, with applications to circuit analysis and communication systems. The second part of the course introduces probability mass and density functions, random variables and functions of random variables.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121,122) or (MATH 142, 151); (X) ECEN 220

2/3 • CRN 33057 • Mon, Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 222 – Computational Algebra and Calculus

This course covers fundamental concepts in linear algebra and multivariable calculus, with an emphasis on their applications to physical and engineering problems. Topics covered include linear transformations, matrix decomposition including the singular value decomposition, Taylor series, calculus of vector-valued functions, multivariate functions and vector fields. Mathematical software will be used extensively.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121, 122) or (MATH 142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 33042 • Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

NWEN 241 – Systems Programming

This course considers the issues raised when programming at a low-level, for example in embedded systems, OS system level, or network protocol stacks. It includes an introduction to C language programming and motivating examples related to a wide variety of applications of system programming.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18315 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EEEN 301 – Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems

The course develops an understanding of the structure of computers, how they execute programs and how they interface to the real world. The course first covers ARM assembly language programming, data representation, computer arithmetic, microprocessor architecture at the hardware level and a comparison with GPU, DSP and FPGA architectures. The course then explores the design flow and application of embedded computers in real-world engineering problems. Practical experience is gained using microprocessors, techniques to interface them with the physical world, development tool chains, debugging and embedded Linux operating systems.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 202 (or ECEN 202), NWEN 241 (X) ECEN 301, NWEN 342

1/3 • CRN 34002 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 310 – Communication Engineering

The course provides students with an introduction to the physical layer of communication systems. It begins with basics of analog communications (AM, FM). Digital communications topics include intersymbol interference and Nyquist pulse shaping for bandlimited channels, matched filter receivers for additive noise channels and their error rate performance. Also covered are fundamentals of wireless fading channels and diversity receivers, followed by a brief overview of equalisation and OFDM.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 220 (or ECEN 220); (X) ECEN 310

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 313 – Power Electronics and Electrical Machines

This course covers the theory, design and application of electrical machines, power electronic circuits, electric drives, and the transformation and control of electrical energy. The course introduces the fundamentals of electromagnetics and electrical machines, as well as power electronics and discusses the design issues related to electrical drives and small-scale power generation. Practical work will involve the design, development, and implementation of solutions to drive motors, convert renewable power, and switch mode power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203 (or ECEN 203), EEEN 204 (or ECEN 204)

2/3 • CRN 33058 • Mon, Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 315 – Control and Instrumentation

The course shows how models can be used to analyse, describe and predict the behaviour of mechanical and electrical systems. The use of feedback to alter the properties of these systems to meet desired specifications is presented. A variety of methods are developed for designing control systems, including the use of a PID controller.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203 (or ECEN 203) (X) ECEN 315

1/3 • CRN 34004 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EEEN 320 – Signals, Systems and Statistics 2

The course introduces analysis techniques for discrete-time signals and linear time-invariant systems as well as topics in engineering statistics. The first part of the course focuses on discrete-time signals and systems and discrete Fourier transform techniques, with applications to circuit analysis and communication systems. The second part of the course covers topics in engineering statistics, including confidence intervals, statistical tests, and regression, as applied to engineering problems.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 220 (or ECEN 220) (X) ECEN 321

2/3 • CRN 34005 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

EEEN 325 – Robotic Engineering

This course presents the principles of robotic and mechatronic design, construction and control. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of integrating mechanical, electronic and software components.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 201 (X) ECEN 301

2/3 • CRN 34006 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

EEEN 401 – Applied Electromagnetics and Compliance

This course will address the engineering applications of electromagnetism, including propagation of signals, low EM emissions circuit board design, radio waves and antennas, grounding, high voltage insulators, and electrical safety design and testing. An important focus of the course is to become familiar with the international framework of product compliance and sustainability.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 313, one of (ENGR 222, MATH 244)

2/3 • CRN 34003 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 402 – Programmable Digital Logic

The course develops an understanding of the structure of Field Programmable Gate Arrays, how to program them and how to interface them to the real world. The topics covered are VHDL programming, logic design, state machine design, I/O, design tools, simulation, timing analysis, debugging, IP block design methodology, softcore microprocessors and system on a chip implementation. Practical experience is gained through the use of professional design tools and hardware to interface FPGAs with the physical world.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 301 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 302

2/3 • CRN 34014 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 403 – Advanced Electronic Instrumentation

This course develops a deeper understanding of electronic instrumentation and the underlying models and methodologies used in electronic design. Topics covered are: derivation of discrete device models (including noise behaviour) for simulation, radio frequency design and simulation, two port networks, power transfer and impedance matching, transmission lines, high speed PCB design, noise, discrete device and Op Amp low noise amplifier design and Phase Locked Loop modelling and implementation. Practical skills are developed through laboratory simulation and design exercises.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 315 (or ECEN 303) (X) ECEN 403

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 410 – Advanced Communications Engineering

The course covers advanced topics in physical layer wireless communications. It begins with a brief introduction to Information Theory, leading to the concept of channel capacity. Multiple antenna techniques for both single and multiple user communications are discussed, including diversity, space time coding and digital beamforming. Large scale systems and advanced channel models are discussed. Matlab system simulations are used throughout the course for evaluating the communication system performance.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 310 (or ECEN 310) (X) ECEN 410

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 411 – Coding and Cryptography for Communications

The course covers key topics in modern coding theory (finite vector spaces, linear codes, coding bounds, perfect codes, cyclic codes) as applied to wireless communication systems. Further topics include cryptography (classical ciphers, the one-time pad, Shannon's Theorem, linear shift registers, public key cryptography, one-way functions, the RSA cryptosystem, key distribution and digital signatures).

15 pts • (P) EEEN 310 (or ECEN 310) (X) MATH 324

2/3 • CRN 34022 • tba [Kelburn]

EEEN 415 – Advanced Control Systems Engineering

This course extends previous control studies to cover the use of modern control techniques in shaping the behaviour of complex systems having multiple inputs and outputs, in both discrete and continuous time. Optimal control (LQR) and estimation (the Kalman filter) are introduced. The course concentrates on linear and linearised systems, but some introductory nonlinear material is presented, including applications to robot control.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 315 (or ECEN 315) (X) ECEN 415

2/3 • CRN 34029 • Mon, Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 421 – Advanced Signal Processing

This course provides a geometric intuition to signal processing. This geometric point of view is a powerful tool for the understanding of signal processing techniques including transforms, sampling, time-frequency analysis and wavelets. The course provides the mathematical depth and rigor that is necessary for the study of more advanced topics in signal processing, including stochastic processes and estimation.

15 pts • (P) one of (ECEN 321, EEEN 320, MATH 318, MATH 377, STAT 332) (X) ECEN 421

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 422 – Convex Optimisation

Convex optimisation problems are common in science, engineering and economics. The course teaches identifying and solving convex optimisation problems. It discusses convex sets and functions, linear and quadratic programs, semi-definite programming, and duality theory. It uses these concepts to solve practical optimisation problems .

15 pts • (P) EEEN 320 (or ECEN 320 or 321) (X) ECEN 422, ECEN 426 in 2014–2016

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 425 – Advanced Robotic Engineering

This course presents advanced principles of robotic and mechatronic design, prototyping, construction and control. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of integrating the mechanical, electronic and software components and applies relevant machine learning concepts.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 325 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 425

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 427 – Special Topic: Advanced Mechatronic Design

The course will cover a number of topics in design, simulation, construction and testing of advanced mechatronic systems, addressing both theoretical and practical design aspects.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 325 or EEEN 301

1/3 • CRN 34034 • Mon, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

EEEN 430 – Robotic Intelligence and Design

The course addresses the applications of artificially intelligent systems in embodied scenarios. It will teach the skills to assess tasks, evaluate appropriate techniques, and will provide experience in designing and implementing solutions and communicating the benefits of AI in physically based tasks.

15 pts • (P) one of (COMP 309, EEEN 325 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 430

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 431 – Musical Robotics

This project-based course incorporates a music theme in the design and construction of a novel mechatronic instrument. The necessary fundamentals of the appropriate music theory are introduced, and then students are guided in a project-based learning style to develop an actuator and sensor rich robotic device that can play a suitable music score. Students are evaluated on their design, construction and testing of this robotic device.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 325 or equivalent (X) ECEN 427 in 2017-2018

Not offered in 2024

Electronic and Computer System Engineering

See also Computer Science and Physics

ENGR 101 – Engineering Technology

This course provides a general introduction to the fundamental technical concepts needed to understand the design and engineering of electronic, mechatronic, networked and software systems. Experience is gained in basic engineering practice, with assembly and testing of basic hardware, software and networked systems, and construction of a personal computer.

15 pts • (P) enrolment in BE(Hons)

1/3 • CRN 15243 • Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ENGR 110 – Engineering Design

This course addresses the engineering design process through a collection of engineering projects that require a range of technologies and design techniques. Sustainability will be an important component of the course, with some of the projects addressing technology and design for sustainable engineering.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112, ENGR 101 (X) ENGR 111

2/3 • CRN 26051 • Mon, Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 121 – Engineering Mathematics Foundations

An introduction to the range of mathematical techniques employed by engineers, including functions, calculus, linear algebra, vector geometry, set theory, logic and probability. This course emphasises engineering applications and modelling.

15 pts • (P) (16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132 (X) Any pair (MATH 141/QUAN 111, MATH 151/161/177)

1/3 • CRN 26052 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 31158 • Mon, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 122 – Engineering Mathematics with Calculus

Further mathematical techniques employed by electrical and electronic engineers, with a focus on methods of calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. There is an emphasis on engineering applications and use of software.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 or MATH 141; (X) the pair (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 26053 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 123 – Engineering Mathematics with Logic and Statistics

Mathematical techniques employed by cybersecurity and software engineers, including combinatorics, logic, probability distributions, model fitting and estimation. The course emphasises engineering applications.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121; (X) the pair MATH 161, (MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 27044 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31159 • Tue, Wed, Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 141 – Engineering Science

ENGR 141 deals with scientific topics relevant to Engineering. Topics will include forms and use of energy, Newton’s laws of motion, gravity, waves, thermodynamics and required math concepts (limits, derivatives, functions). Students will obtain an appreciation for quantitative scientific reasoning and the role of fundamental physical laws in governing human energy use.

15 pts • (P) (16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132 (X) PHYS 101, PHYS 114, PHYS 115

1/3 • CRN 30094 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGR 142 – Engineering Physics for Electronics and Computer Systems

Physics theory and practice relevant to electronics and computer systems engineering. Topics covered will include electrostatics (charge, force, field, potential), magnetic field and force, DC and AC circuits, electromagnetic induction and other selected topics. Lectures, assignments and laboratory work will all focus on the application of physics to engineering situations.

15 pts • (P) either ENGR 141 and (ENGR 121 or MATH 141) or approved levels of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Physics and Calculus or equivalent (X) PHYS 115, 142

2/3 • CRN 27045 • Mon, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 201 – Engineering in Context

This course addresses the research, analysis, critical and creative thinking skills embodied in written and oral communication which professional engineers are expected to display in the workplace. While addressing these aspects, the course at the same time develops the personal and interpersonal skills required to work effectively as part of a team in an engineering context.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 101, 110 and 45 further points from Part 1 of the BE(Hons) schedule

2/3 • CRN 29036 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn]

ENGR 222 – Computational Algebra and Calculus

This course covers fundamental concepts in linear algebra and multivariable calculus, with an emphasis on their applications to physical and engineering problems. Topics covered include linear transformations, matrix decomposition including the singular value decomposition, Taylor series, calculus of vector-valued functions, multivariate functions and vector fields. Mathematical software will be used extensively.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121, 122) or (MATH 142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 33042 • Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 240 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 241 – Directed Individual Study

30 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 301 – Engineering Project Management 1

The course takes a practice-based approach to teaching engineering project management, including aspects of project life cycle, requirements analysis, principles of design, project tasks and deliverables, contracts, cost estimation, project scheduling, risk management, quality assurance, managing project resources, testing and delivery, interpersonal communication, teamwork and project leadership. Students will work on a technical group project which will provide opportunities to practice the project management techniques learned in class.

15 pts • (P) Satisfactory completion of Part 1 of the BE(Hons), ENGR 201 and 60 200-level pts from (CYBR, COMP, ECEN, EEEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN)

1/3 • CRN 17178 • Mon, Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 302 – Engineering Project Management 2

The course uses a large collaborative group project to teach engineering project management. Through the project, the students will experience the full lifecycle of a project, from requirements analysis through design and implementation to closing the project.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 301

2/3 • CRN 17179 • Tue, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 338 – ST: EEEN Project Management

The course presents material on systems engineering and project management of relevance to engineering projects involving physical hardware. Topics covered will include techniques for supporting successful group work, approaches to project management and systems engineering principles including sustainability, reliability and safety.

15 pts • (P) Satisfactory completion of Part 1 of the BE(Hons), ENGR 201and 60 200-level pts from (CYBR, COMP, ECEN, EEEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN); enrolment in the EEEN major; (X) ENGR 301

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 339 – ST: EEEN Group Project

Students will work in teams to design, prototype and test a working electromechanical device according to user requirements. Aspects of professional engineering practice such as sustainability, reliability, safety and ethics will be considered as appropriate.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 338 in 2024; (X) ENGR 302

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 340 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 341 – Directed Individual Study

30 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 401 – Professional Practice

This course will prepare student's expectations for many of the events and situations they are likely to meet in the professional working world. This includes: codes of conduct, as determined by professional bodies and company practices; ethical behaviour, as found in the workplace and dictated by company practices; critical thinking and people issues, as relevant in the workplace and in company practice.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 201, 301, 302; 45 further 300-level pts from the BE(Hons) Schedule

1/3 • CRN 18690 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENGR 440 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from CGRA, COMP, CYBR, ECEN, EEEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN; Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 26008 • tba [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27189 • tba [Kelburn]

ENGR 441 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from CGRA, COMP, CYBR, ECEN, EEEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN; Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 26239 • tba [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 26009 • tba [Kelburn]

ENGR 489 – Engineering Project

Students will work on an individual project of a complex nature in order to develop a solution to an engineering problem. In addition to the technical engineering development work, the project may require consideration of issues such as customer specifications, cost analysis, IP and product testing and delivery. Students will be required to give an oral and a poster presentation as well as a final report on their project.

30 pts • (P) ENGR 201, 301, 302; 45 further 300-level pts from the BE(Hons) schedule

1+2/3 • CRN 18688 • Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 491 – Professional Work Experience

Completion of the work experience requirement for the BE.

0 pts • (P) ENGR 391, 401

3+1/3 • CRN 34127 • tba [Kelburn]

Engineering

See also Computer System Engineering, Network Engineering, and Software Engineering

ENGR 101 – Engineering Technology

This course provides a general introduction to the fundamental technical concepts needed to understand the design and engineering of electronic, mechatronic, networked and software systems. Experience is gained in basic engineering practice, with assembly and testing of basic hardware, software and networked systems, and construction of a personal computer.

15 pts • (P) enrolment in BE(Hons)

1/3 • CRN 15243 • Tue 9-10 [Kelburn], Thu 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

lab tba

ENGR 110 – Engineering Design

This course addresses the engineering design process through a collection of engineering projects that require a range of technologies and design techniques. Sustainability will be an important component of the course, with some of the projects addressing technology and design for sustainable engineering.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112, ENGR 101 (X) ENGR 111

2/3 • CRN 26051 • Mon, Wed, Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 121 – Engineering Mathematics Foundations

An introduction to the range of mathematical techniques employed by engineers, including functions, calculus, linear algebra, vector geometry, set theory, logic and probability. This course emphasises engineering applications and modelling.

15 pts • (P) (16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132 (X) Any pair (MATH 141/QUAN 111, MATH 151/161/177)

1/3 • CRN 26052 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 31158 • Mon, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 122 – Engineering Mathematics with Calculus

Further mathematical techniques employed by electrical and electronic engineers, with a focus on methods of calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. There is an emphasis on engineering applications and use of software.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121 or MATH 141; (X) the pair (MATH 142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 26053 • Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 123 – Engineering Mathematics with Logic and Statistics

Mathematical techniques employed by cybersecurity and software engineers, including combinatorics, logic, probability distributions, model fitting and estimation. The course emphasises engineering applications.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 121; (X) the pair MATH 161, (MATH 177, QUAN 102 or STAT 193)

2/3 • CRN 27044 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 31159 • Tue, Wed, Thu 11-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 141 – Engineering Science

ENGR 141 deals with scientific topics relevant to Engineering. Topics will include forms and use of energy, Newton’s laws of motion, gravity, waves, thermodynamics and required math concepts (limits, derivatives, functions). Students will obtain an appreciation for quantitative scientific reasoning and the role of fundamental physical laws in governing human energy use.

15 pts • (P) (16 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 in Mathematics) or (12 Achievement Standard credits NCEA Level 3 Mathematics excluding the statistics standards 91580, 91581, 91582, 91583, 91584) or MATH 132 (X) PHYS 101, PHYS 114, PHYS 115

1/3 • CRN 30094 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

ENGR 142 – Engineering Physics for Electronics and Computer Systems

Physics theory and practice relevant to electronics and computer systems engineering. Topics covered will include electrostatics (charge, force, field, potential), magnetic field and force, DC and AC circuits, electromagnetic induction and other selected topics. Lectures, assignments and laboratory work will all focus on the application of physics to engineering situations.

15 pts • (P) either ENGR 141 and (ENGR 121 or MATH 141) or approved levels of achievement in NCEA Level 3 Physics and Calculus or equivalent (X) PHYS 115, 142

2/3 • CRN 27045 • Mon, Wed, Fri 4-5pm [Kelburn], Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn]

RESE 111 – Introduction to Renewable Energy Systems

This course provides an overview of the role of energy systems in sustainability, and the development trends, past and future, of different technologies. The ways in which the technologies influence industry, government, and society are examined from a range of different perspectives. Students will gain practical skills in energy generation and utilisation through a range of experiments, as well as skills in modelling renewable energy systems for different contexts. Mathematics and physics at NCEA level 3 are recommended, but not essential to take this course.

15 pts • (X) ENGR 111, ENGR 110 in 2019-2020

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 201 – Mechatronic Design and Prototyping

This course will equip students with a basic understanding of mechanical theory and the skills of electronic and mechanical design and construction so that they can successfully design and complete a moderately complex project. A presentation of this project work forms an integral part of the course.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112; ENGR 101, 110; ENGR 121 or MATH 141 or equivalent; (X) ECEN 201

2/3 • CRN 33053 • Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 202 – Digital Electronics and Microprocessors

An introduction to the design and construction of digital electronic instruments. Following a review of binary arithmetic and Boolean algebra, the course will focus on the design of digital circuits using both combinatorial and sequential logic. Further work will study microprocessor architectures, programming and interfacing and the conversions of digital and analogue signals.

15 pts • (P) one of (COMP 102, 112, ENGR 101, 121, MATH 161) (X) ECEN 202

1/3 • CRN 33054 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 203 – Circuit Analysis

This course covers the analysis of analogue electrical and electronic circuits. Topics covered include basic circuit theorems, operational amplifier circuits, the use of phasors for AC circuit analysis and the Laplace transform for switched systems. The use of computational and measurement tools for circuit characterisation is also covered.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 122 or MATH 142); (ENGR 142 or PHYS 142 or 115); (X) ECEN 203

1/3 • CRN 33055 • Tue, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

EEEN 204 – Electronic Devices

This course introduces fundamental electronic devices and their circuit applications. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals, diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers and the operation and application of special function diodes such as light emitting diodes and solar cells. Prototyping and testing of practical circuits using these electronic devices will be addressed in the laboratory sessions.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 122 or MATH 142); (ENGR 142 or PHYS 142 or 115); (X) ECEN 204

2/3 • CRN 33056 • Tue, Wed, Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EEEN 220 – Signals, Systems and Statistics 1

The course introduces analysis techniques for signals and linear time-invariant systems as well as fundamentals of engineering statistics. The first part of the course focuses on continuous time signals and systems and Fourier transform techniques, with applications to circuit analysis and communication systems. The second part of the course introduces probability mass and density functions, random variables and functions of random variables.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121,122) or (MATH 142, 151); (X) ECEN 220

2/3 • CRN 33057 • Mon, Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 201 – Engineering in Context

This course addresses the research, analysis, critical and creative thinking skills embodied in written and oral communication which professional engineers are expected to display in the workplace. While addressing these aspects, the course at the same time develops the personal and interpersonal skills required to work effectively as part of a team in an engineering context.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 101, 110 and 45 further points from Part 1 of the BE(Hons) schedule

2/3 • CRN 29036 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn]

ENGR 222 – Computational Algebra and Calculus

This course covers fundamental concepts in linear algebra and multivariable calculus, with an emphasis on their applications to physical and engineering problems. Topics covered include linear transformations, matrix decomposition including the singular value decomposition, Taylor series, calculus of vector-valued functions, multivariate functions and vector fields. Mathematical software will be used extensively.

15 pts • (P) (ENGR 121, 122) or (MATH 142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 33042 • Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 240 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 241 – Directed Individual Study

30 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 241 – Systems Programming

This course considers the issues raised when programming at a low-level, for example in embedded systems, OS system level, or network protocol stacks. It includes an introduction to C language programming and motivating examples related to a wide variety of applications of system programming.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18315 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

NWEN 243 – Clouds and Networking

The course provides a broad introduction to computer networks and a basic understanding of network application programming, with an emphasis on the working principles and application of computer networks. It covers a range of introductory topics including the essentials of data communication, computer network concepts, protocols, network applications and cloud computing. The course features an interactive laboratory component with projects starting from basic networking technologies leading into cloud application development.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

2/3 • CRN 19863 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

RESE 211 – Renewable Energy Generation Systems

This course will expose the students to the different energy generation systems, and especially those that utilise renewable resources: wind energy (pumping and power), geothermal, hydro (different scales), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and bioenergy. For each system, the theoretical underpinning will be examined; for example, optical physics to harness solar radiation in a concentrating solar technology. The life cycle (sustainability) implications of the different systems will also be explored, including manufacturing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 110 or RESE 111; ENGR 121 (or MATH 141 and 151); ENGR 141 ((or PHYS 114 or 101) and (CHEM 114 or 122))

Not offered in 2024

RESE 212 – Renewable Energy Conversion and Storage

This course will provide the students with insight into technologies to convert generated energy into useful fuels or power in the economy and society. It will specifically focus on bioenergy conversion processes, such as gasification, pyrolysis and torrefaction; chemical storage (solid-state and liquid batteries); and pumped and mechanical storage. For each technology platform the underlying physics and chemistry will be examined, with related practical experiments in the laboratory. The life cycle (sustainability) implications of the different,= technologies will also be explored, including manufacturing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 110 or RESE 111; ENGR 121 (or MATH 141 and 151); ENGR 141 (or (PHYS 114 or 101) and (CHEM 114 or 122))

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 221 – Software Development

This course develops a deeper understanding of object- oriented programming and associated practices. The focus is on programming techniques at the micro scale. Topics include: inheritance, polymorphism, genericity, error handling, testing and debugging. A sequence of short assignments will develop the key ideas and practices; rigour in testing will be developed through (automated) assessment of programme correctness.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103

1/3 • CRN 18318 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn], Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 225 – Software Design

This course develops a strong understanding of object-oriented design. Students will study modelling and programming techniques that support the analysis, design and development of large and maintainable programs. Students will work together in groups on an engineering problem and use a variety of best practices (e.g. Design Patterns) and notations (e.g. UML). Students will use specialized tools to apply these techniques in practical work.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 221; (X) SWEN 222

2/3 • CRN 30043 • Tue, Thu, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 301 – Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems

The course develops an understanding of the structure of computers, how they execute programs and how they interface to the real world. The course first covers ARM assembly language programming, data representation, computer arithmetic, microprocessor architecture at the hardware level and a comparison with GPU, DSP and FPGA architectures. The course then explores the design flow and application of embedded computers in real-world engineering problems. Practical experience is gained using microprocessors, techniques to interface them with the physical world, development tool chains, debugging and embedded Linux operating systems.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 202 (or ECEN 202), NWEN 241 (X) ECEN 301, NWEN 342

1/3 • CRN 34002 • Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 310 – Communication Engineering

The course provides students with an introduction to the physical layer of communication systems. It begins with basics of analog communications (AM, FM). Digital communications topics include intersymbol interference and Nyquist pulse shaping for bandlimited channels, matched filter receivers for additive noise channels and their error rate performance. Also covered are fundamentals of wireless fading channels and diversity receivers, followed by a brief overview of equalisation and OFDM.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 220 (or ECEN 220); (X) ECEN 310

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 313 – Power Electronics and Electrical Machines

This course covers the theory, design and application of electrical machines, power electronic circuits, electric drives, and the transformation and control of electrical energy. The course introduces the fundamentals of electromagnetics and electrical machines, as well as power electronics and discusses the design issues related to electrical drives and small-scale power generation. Practical work will involve the design, development, and implementation of solutions to drive motors, convert renewable power, and switch mode power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203 (or ECEN 203), EEEN 204 (or ECEN 204)

2/3 • CRN 33058 • Mon, Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 315 – Control and Instrumentation

The course shows how models can be used to analyse, describe and predict the behaviour of mechanical and electrical systems. The use of feedback to alter the properties of these systems to meet desired specifications is presented. A variety of methods are developed for designing control systems, including the use of a PID controller.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203 (or ECEN 203) (X) ECEN 315

1/3 • CRN 34004 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

EEEN 320 – Signals, Systems and Statistics 2

The course introduces analysis techniques for discrete-time signals and linear time-invariant systems as well as topics in engineering statistics. The first part of the course focuses on discrete-time signals and systems and discrete Fourier transform techniques, with applications to circuit analysis and communication systems. The second part of the course covers topics in engineering statistics, including confidence intervals, statistical tests, and regression, as applied to engineering problems.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 220 (or ECEN 220) (X) ECEN 321

2/3 • CRN 34005 • Mon, Tue, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

EEEN 325 – Robotic Engineering

This course presents the principles of robotic and mechatronic design, construction and control. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of integrating mechanical, electronic and software components.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 201 (X) ECEN 301

2/3 • CRN 34006 • Mon 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

ENGR 301 – Engineering Project Management 1

The course takes a practice-based approach to teaching engineering project management, including aspects of project life cycle, requirements analysis, principles of design, project tasks and deliverables, contracts, cost estimation, project scheduling, risk management, quality assurance, managing project resources, testing and delivery, interpersonal communication, teamwork and project leadership. Students will work on a technical group project which will provide opportunities to practice the project management techniques learned in class.

15 pts • (P) Satisfactory completion of Part 1 of the BE(Hons), ENGR 201 and 60 200-level pts from (CYBR, COMP, ECEN, EEEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN)

1/3 • CRN 17178 • Mon, Tue 4-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 4-5pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 302 – Engineering Project Management 2

The course uses a large collaborative group project to teach engineering project management. Through the project, the students will experience the full lifecycle of a project, from requirements analysis through design and implementation to closing the project.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 301

2/3 • CRN 17179 • Tue, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 338 – ST: EEEN Project Management

The course presents material on systems engineering and project management of relevance to engineering projects involving physical hardware. Topics covered will include techniques for supporting successful group work, approaches to project management and systems engineering principles including sustainability, reliability and safety.

15 pts • (P) Satisfactory completion of Part 1 of the BE(Hons), ENGR 201and 60 200-level pts from (CYBR, COMP, ECEN, EEEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN); enrolment in the EEEN major; (X) ENGR 301

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 339 – ST: EEEN Group Project

Students will work in teams to design, prototype and test a working electromechanical device according to user requirements. Aspects of professional engineering practice such as sustainability, reliability, safety and ethics will be considered as appropriate.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 338 in 2024; (X) ENGR 302

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 340 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 341 – Directed Individual Study

30 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 301 – Operating Systems Design

This course addresses the design and implementation of operating sytems and examines fundamental concepts such as resource management, concurrency, protection and security. Examples drawn from a range of modern operating systems illustrate these concepts and project work provides practical experience in the design and implementation of operating systems.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 302 – Computer Network Design

This course addresses the principles, architectures and protocols that have shaped the development of the Internet and modern networked applications. It examines network design principles, underlying protocols, technologies and architectures of the TCP/IP protocol stack. Topics include the design of transport protocols, routing protocols, logical link control, medium access control and physical media.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 243; ENGR 123 or (MATH 161 and one of (MATH 177 or QUAN 102 or STAT 193))

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 303 – Concurrent Programming

This course examines a range of techniques for programming multi-threaded and distributed applications. Topics include synchronisation mechanisms used for programs that communicate via shared memory and message passing techniques for programs that communicate across a network. Practical work involves implementing programs using these techniques in a modern concurrent language, such as Java.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 123 or MATH 161; SWEN 221; 15 points from (COMP 261, CYBR 271, NWEN 241, 243)

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 304 – Advanced Network Applications

This course introduces technologies, algorithms and systems for developing secure, scalable and reliable web server applications. Specific emphasis will be placed on application development middleware, computer security, network protocols and distributed systems. Particularly a variety of topics ranging from fundamental to advanced technologies for developing RESTful web applications, including MVC, distributed authentication and authorization, secure data communication, web caching and content replication, will be covered in lectures.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 123 or MATH 161, NWEN 243; COMP 261 or NWEN 241 or SWEN 221

Not offered in 2024

RESE 311 – Energy Economic Analyses

This course introduces principles of economics, and how they relate to energy systems, specifically reflecting on the energy-economic nexus. It explores practical techniques to analyse the micro- and macro-economic implications of transitions in the energy system along with relevant business and financial analysis techniques. It presents an overview of the Resource Management Act and related aspects for engineering projects, such as Environmental Impact Assessments.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212; one of (STAT 193, QUAN 102, ECEN 321)

Not offered in 2024

RESE 312 – Sustainability Modelling Techniques

This course introduces various approaches to analyse the sustainability of systems, such as cost-benefit analysis, life cycle analysis, and simulation modelling techniques, with a focus on system dynamics modelling. Practical work explores simulation using an industry- standard software package and a project to model and investigate the sustainability implications of an implemented renewable energy technology in a specific context; for example, a bioenergy system in an island community.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212

Not offered in 2024

RESE 321 – Renewable Energy Generation Engineering

This course introduces a range of different energy generation systems, and especially those that utilise renewable resources: wind energy (pumping and power), geothermal, hydro (at different scales), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and bioenergy. For each technology, the theoretical underpinning is examined – for example, optical physics to harness solar radiation in concentrating solar systems – and the engineering approaches to identify and design efficiency improvements for such systems are established.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203, 204 (X) RESE 211

1/3 • CRN 34007 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 322 – Renewable Energy Storage Engineering

This course provides insights into technologies that convert renewable energy generation into useful fuels or power in the economy and society. It will include bioenergy conversion processes, such as gasification, pyrolysis and torrefaction; chemical storage (solid-state and liquid batteries); thermal storage; and pumped and mechanical storage. It examines the underlying physics and chemistry for each technology platform, with related practical experiments in the laboratory. The engineering approaches to identify and design efficiency improvements for such systems are established.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203, 204; (X) RESE 212

Not offered in 2024

RESE 323 – Renewable Energy Policy

This course provides an overview of the policy context of renewable energy, consisting of the regulatory, institutional, and market setting for renewable energy technologies. It explores the sustainability of the technologies from the perspectives of policy-makers and other stakeholders. The course equips students with the means to assess, identify, and prioritise renewable energy technologies from the perspectives of various stakeholders, as well as decision-making tools to promote appropriate and sustainable renewable energy technologies from a policy perspective.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 301 – Scalable Software Development

This course introduces the processes, practices, and tools required to engineer medium to large software systems, and to address challenges arising from the emerging complexity of such systems. Topics include software craft, architecture, design, implementation, testing, maintenance, quality assurance, configuration management, build automation and principled use of components and libraries, and open-source development. Practical work will use integrated development environments, automation, and domain specific languages.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 225

2/3 • CRN 17183 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 303 – User Experience Engineering

This course addresses the engineering of user experiences (UX). It presents principles and guidelines for design and covers a range of design and engineering processes. It presents techniques for user testing of applications, digital systems, and physical devices.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 221 (X) INFO 307

1/3 • CRN 17185 • Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 304 – Database System Engineering

The course addresses fundamental principles underlying databases and database management systems. It covers the structure and principles of the relational data model, including SQL, and the principled design of the relational database schema. It also addresses issues in database transaction procession, concurrency control, recovery, and the complexity of query processing.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 221; ENGR 123 or MATH 161 (X) COMP 302, INFO 310

1/3 • CRN 17186 • Mon, Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SWEN 324 – Software Correctness

This course is concerned with the development of correct software, especially the use of formal requirements and specifications to develop high-integrity software. This has applications in several areas, such as safety-critical systems (e.g. commercial airliners, space systems, etc.) and high-performance concurrent systems. The course will examine a range of principles and techniques which underpin a rigorous approach to the specification and implementation of software. A sequence of assignments and labs will see a range of tools being used to specify small software systems, and to check that they meet their requirements.

15 pts • (P) COMP 103; ENGR 123 or MATH 161; 30 200-level COMP/NWEN/SWEN points; (X) SWEN 224

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 325 – Software Development for Mobile Platforms

This course addresses the concepts, techniques, and tools required for developing applications within software frameworks for mobile platforms. Topics include the concepts and principles underlying software frameworks, the design and implementation of client-server applications, principles of user experience design for frameworks, the design and implementation of client-server applications, principles of user experience design for mobile applications, and key concepts in reliability, privacy, security and safety critical systems. Practical work will involve the design, implementation and testing of a range of mobile applications.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 243, SWEN 225 (or 222)

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 326 – Safety-Critical Systems

This course addresses the concepts, techniques and tools required for developing computer systems that are applicable where safety and reliability is paramount. Topics include: the concepts and principles underlying safety-critical systems & standards (e.g. DO178C and IEC61508); techniques for design validation (e.g. model checking); and implementation techniques for ensuring software correctness (e.g. coding guidelines, testing, static analysis, etc). Practical work will involve the design, implementation, and analysis of simple safety critical applications (e.g. for industrial, embedded and healthcare systems).

15 pts • (P) (NWEN 241 or SWEN 225), 15 further 200-level AIML, CGRA, COMP, CYBR, EEEN, NWEN, SWEN pts

1/3 • CRN 30042 • Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

EEEN 401 – Applied Electromagnetics and Compliance

This course will address the engineering applications of electromagnetism, including propagation of signals, low EM emissions circuit board design, radio waves and antennas, grounding, high voltage insulators, and electrical safety design and testing. An important focus of the course is to become familiar with the international framework of product compliance and sustainability.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 313, one of (ENGR 222, MATH 244)

2/3 • CRN 34003 • Mon, Wed, Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 402 – Programmable Digital Logic

The course develops an understanding of the structure of Field Programmable Gate Arrays, how to program them and how to interface them to the real world. The topics covered are VHDL programming, logic design, state machine design, I/O, design tools, simulation, timing analysis, debugging, IP block design methodology, softcore microprocessors and system on a chip implementation. Practical experience is gained through the use of professional design tools and hardware to interface FPGAs with the physical world.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 301 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 302

2/3 • CRN 34014 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 403 – Advanced Electronic Instrumentation

This course develops a deeper understanding of electronic instrumentation and the underlying models and methodologies used in electronic design. Topics covered are: derivation of discrete device models (including noise behaviour) for simulation, radio frequency design and simulation, two port networks, power transfer and impedance matching, transmission lines, high speed PCB design, noise, discrete device and Op Amp low noise amplifier design and Phase Locked Loop modelling and implementation. Practical skills are developed through laboratory simulation and design exercises.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 315 (or ECEN 303) (X) ECEN 403

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 410 – Advanced Communications Engineering

The course covers advanced topics in physical layer wireless communications. It begins with a brief introduction to Information Theory, leading to the concept of channel capacity. Multiple antenna techniques for both single and multiple user communications are discussed, including diversity, space time coding and digital beamforming. Large scale systems and advanced channel models are discussed. Matlab system simulations are used throughout the course for evaluating the communication system performance.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 310 (or ECEN 310) (X) ECEN 410

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 411 – Coding and Cryptography for Communications

The course covers key topics in modern coding theory (finite vector spaces, linear codes, coding bounds, perfect codes, cyclic codes) as applied to wireless communication systems. Further topics include cryptography (classical ciphers, the one-time pad, Shannon's Theorem, linear shift registers, public key cryptography, one-way functions, the RSA cryptosystem, key distribution and digital signatures).

15 pts • (P) EEEN 310 (or ECEN 310) (X) MATH 324

2/3 • CRN 34022 • tba [Kelburn]

EEEN 415 – Advanced Control Systems Engineering

This course extends previous control studies to cover the use of modern control techniques in shaping the behaviour of complex systems having multiple inputs and outputs, in both discrete and continuous time. Optimal control (LQR) and estimation (the Kalman filter) are introduced. The course concentrates on linear and linearised systems, but some introductory nonlinear material is presented, including applications to robot control.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 315 (or ECEN 315) (X) ECEN 415

2/3 • CRN 34029 • Mon, Wed, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

EEEN 421 – Advanced Signal Processing

This course provides a geometric intuition to signal processing. This geometric point of view is a powerful tool for the understanding of signal processing techniques including transforms, sampling, time-frequency analysis and wavelets. The course provides the mathematical depth and rigor that is necessary for the study of more advanced topics in signal processing, including stochastic processes and estimation.

15 pts • (P) one of (ECEN 321, EEEN 320, MATH 318, MATH 377, STAT 332) (X) ECEN 421

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 422 – Convex Optimisation

Convex optimisation problems are common in science, engineering and economics. The course teaches identifying and solving convex optimisation problems. It discusses convex sets and functions, linear and quadratic programs, semi-definite programming, and duality theory. It uses these concepts to solve practical optimisation problems .

15 pts • (P) EEEN 320 (or ECEN 320 or 321) (X) ECEN 422, ECEN 426 in 2014–2016

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 425 – Advanced Robotic Engineering

This course presents advanced principles of robotic and mechatronic design, prototyping, construction and control. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of integrating the mechanical, electronic and software components and applies relevant machine learning concepts.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 325 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 425

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 427 – Special Topic: Advanced Mechatronic Design

The course will cover a number of topics in design, simulation, construction and testing of advanced mechatronic systems, addressing both theoretical and practical design aspects.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 325 or EEEN 301

1/3 • CRN 34034 • Mon, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

EEEN 430 – Robotic Intelligence and Design

The course addresses the applications of artificially intelligent systems in embodied scenarios. It will teach the skills to assess tasks, evaluate appropriate techniques, and will provide experience in designing and implementing solutions and communicating the benefits of AI in physically based tasks.

15 pts • (P) one of (COMP 309, EEEN 325 (or ECEN 301) (X) ECEN 430

Not offered in 2024

EEEN 431 – Musical Robotics

This project-based course incorporates a music theme in the design and construction of a novel mechatronic instrument. The necessary fundamentals of the appropriate music theory are introduced, and then students are guided in a project-based learning style to develop an actuator and sensor rich robotic device that can play a suitable music score. Students are evaluated on their design, construction and testing of this robotic device.

15 pts • (P) ECEN 325 or equivalent (X) ECEN 427 in 2017-2018

Not offered in 2024

ENGR 401 – Professional Practice

This course will prepare student's expectations for many of the events and situations they are likely to meet in the professional working world. This includes: codes of conduct, as determined by professional bodies and company practices; ethical behaviour, as found in the workplace and dictated by company practices; critical thinking and people issues, as relevant in the workplace and in company practice.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 201, 301, 302; 45 further 300-level pts from the BE(Hons) Schedule

1/3 • CRN 18690 • Mon, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENGR 440 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from CGRA, COMP, CYBR, ECEN, EEEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN; Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 26008 • tba [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 27189 • tba [Kelburn]

ENGR 441 – Directed Individual Study

A supervised programme of study approved by the Head of School.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level points from CGRA, COMP, CYBR, ECEN, EEEN, NWEN, RESE, SWEN; Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 26239 • tba [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 26009 • tba [Kelburn]

ENGR 489 – Engineering Project

Students will work on an individual project of a complex nature in order to develop a solution to an engineering problem. In addition to the technical engineering development work, the project may require consideration of issues such as customer specifications, cost analysis, IP and product testing and delivery. Students will be required to give an oral and a poster presentation as well as a final report on their project.

30 pts • (P) ENGR 201, 301, 302; 45 further 300-level pts from the BE(Hons) schedule

1+2/3 • CRN 18688 • Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGR 491 – Professional Work Experience

Completion of the work experience requirement for the BE.

0 pts • (P) ENGR 391, 401

3+1/3 • CRN 34127 • tba [Kelburn]

NWEN 401 – Distributed Systems Design

Distributed system concepts and techniques underlie much of modern computer technology; client-server systems based on high-bandwidth networks support applications ranging from business data processing to multimedia information systems. This course teaches the concepts and principles employed in the design and implementation of distributed systems, with practical examples, providing a suitable knowledge base for those aiming for careers in advanced system and application development, or in research.

15 pts • (P) two courses from (NWEN 301, 302, 303)

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 402 – Internet Engineering

This course addresses the use of important technologies in the design and engineering of modern high performance Internet applications and infrastructure. Course coverage includes views on the impact of economic, political and technical issues on internet engineering which are explored through case studies and recent professional and research literature. These aspects are explored through practical group work in distributed systems/Internet technology plus lectures and seminars.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 302, 304; 15 further 300-level COMP, ECEN, NWEN or SWEN pts

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 403 – Advanced Network Engineering

This course extends the data communications and telecommunication taught in Computer Network Design, concentrating on new developments and network case studies. The course is designed for those aiming for careers that involve networking or network research and enhances the understanding of distributed systems through the applications of distributed systems in network management and Internet infrastructure.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 302, 30 further 300-level pts from (COMP, ECEN, NWEN, SWEN)

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 404 – Mobile Computing

The course introduces the fundamental topics of Mobile Computing. In particular, the course will emphasise the network and transport layers of wireless communication protocols and network infrastructure suitable for mobile personal systems (e.g. GSM, 3G, Mobile IP, etc). Key issues of mobility and disconnected operation with respect to mobile computing systems and quality of service issues in mobile personal systems will be covered and how applications handle node mobility and wireless communications will be explored.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 302 and 30 further 300-level pts from (COMP, ECEN, NWEN, SWEN)

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 405 – Security Engineering

The Internet's role as a large, public, distributed system has raised security to an issue of critical importance. This course examines security mechanisms, security policies, security evaluation and risk management, security issues in networks and operating systems, and case studies that show how these security techniques can be used to solve real- world problems such as conducting trustworthy auctions and secret ballots.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 304, 30 further 300-level pts from (COMP, ECEN, NWEN, SWEN)

Not offered in 2024

NWEN 406 – Distributed Computing in Grids and Clouds

The course focuses on the design and use of distributed systems for high end computing. In particular we look at the aggregation of geographically distributed computing resources to form massive distributed computing platforms. These platforms can then be applied to solve large problems in science and industry - protein docking, seismology medicine, astronomy, particle physics, climate prediction etc. Topics in this course typically include: e-Science, clusters, grids and clouds, service oriented architectures, workflow management, utility computing and grid economies.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 301; NWEN 302 or 303

Not offered in 2024

RESE 411 – Power Systems Analysis

This course introduces the electricity industry and its components along with techniques for modern electric power system modelling and analysis. Topics include transmission line models, transformers and per unit systems, generator models, network matrices, power flow analysis and computation, real and reactive power control, voltage control, and protection. The course incorporates lab and simulation based exercises, an industrial tour, and an industrial project.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 313 or (C) RESE 413

2/3 • CRN 31173 • Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

RESE 412 – Advanced Development of RE Systems

This course presents techniques used to design advanced, integrated renewable energy solutions for given situations. The hardware and control enabling renewable energy systems to interact with a wider grid are presented along with topologies such as nano- and micro-grids. To supplement the technical content, this course presents the concepts of systems engineering, which introduces systems thinking principles.

15 pts • (P) (EEEN 313, 315) or (C) (one of RESE 421, 431)

1/3 • CRN 31165 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

RESE 413 – Power Electronics and Electrical Machines

This course covers the theory, design and and application of electrical machines, power electronic circuits, electric drives, and the transformation and control of electrical energy. The course introduces the fundamentals of power electronics and electrical machines, and discusses the design issues related to electrical drives and small-scale power generation. Practical work will involve the design, development, and implementation of solutions to drive motors, convert renewable power, and switch mode power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203, EEEN 204 (X) EEEN 313, EEEN 405, ECEN 405

2/3 • CRN 35092 • [Kelburn]

RESE 421 – Energy Economic Analyses

This course introduces principles of economics, and how they relate to energy systems, specifically reflecting on the energy-economic nexus. It explores practical techniques to analyse the micro- and macro-economic implications of transitions in the energy system, along with relevant business and financial analysis techniques. It applies the principles and techniques to analyse a real-world topic to inform decision- or policy-making with appropriate conclusions and recommendations.

15 pts • (C) (one of RESE 423, 431, 412) (X) RESE 311

1/3 • CRN 35093 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 422 – Sustainability Modelling Techniques

This course introduces various approaches to analyse the sustainability of systems, such as cost-benefit analysis, and simulation modelling techniques. It then focuses more deeply on system dynamics modelling and life cycle analysis. Practical work explores simulations using industry-standard software packages and a project to model and investigate the sustainability implications of a renewable energy intervention in the economy – to develop a policy brief.

15 pts • (P) One of (RESE 423, 431, 412) (X) RESE 312

2/3 • CRN 35094 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 423 – Case studies of RE Systems

This course provides an overview of the role of energy systems in sustainability, and the development trends, past and future, of different technologies. The ways in which the technologies influence industry, government, and society are examined from a range of different perspectives, by focussing on specific, real-world case studies. Students will also gain practical skills in modelling renewable energy systems for different contexts, by utilising standard industry software packages.

15 pts • (C) One of (RESE 431, RESE 421)

Not offered in 2024

RESE 431 – RE Systems Generation

This course introduces a range of different energy generation systems, and especially those that utilise renewable resources: wind energy (pumping and power), geothermal, hydro (different scales), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and bioenergy. For each technology, the theoretical underpinning is examined with related practical experiments in the laboratory. Approaches to identify and conceptualise efficiency improvements for such systems are established. A practical project is undertaken to conceptualise and demonstrate an improved energy generation system for a real-world context.

15 pts • (X) RESE 321

1/3 • CRN 35096 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 432 – RE Storage and Conversion

This course provides insights into technologies that convert renewable energy generation into useful fuels or power in the economy and society. It will include bioenergy conversion processes, chemical storage (solid-state and liquid batteries), thermal storage, and pumped and mechanical storage. It examines the underlying physics and chemistry for each technology platform with related practical experiments in the laboratory. Approaches to identify and conceptualise efficiency improvements for such systems are established. A practical project is undertaken to conceptualise and demonstrate an improved energy storage system for a real-world context.

15 pts • (X) RESE 322

Not offered in 2024

RESE 451 – Research methods for RE systems (theory)

This course covers the theory and practice of undertaking research. The nature and process of quantitative and qualitative research approaches are explored to enable students to formulate and conduct a research effort to find answers to specific problems related to renewable energy. Topics that will be covered include: the aims of research; the research topic, project title, and research problem; literature review types; population and sampling types; types of quantitative and qualitative research designs; data-collecting methods and measuring instruments in quantitative and qualitative research; data analysis and interpretation of results; and validity of conclusions.

15 pts • (C) one of (RESE 421, 431, 412)

1/3 • CRN 35098 • Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 452 – Research methods for RE systems (project)

This course applies the research theory – from RESE 451 – to a specific renewable energy related, real-world problem that is identified. It explores and applies practical methods to undertake in-depth, critical analyses of the literature to derive the research rationale, objectives/questions, and strategy, as well as grounding the theory and engineering or analytical methods, and the related gaps in knowledge, that are applicable to the identified research problem. Practical workshops are undertaken to instil academic writing techniques that are applied to writing a research proposal and a supporting research article.

15 pts • (P) RESE 451

2/3 • CRN 35099 • Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 487 – Research Project

This course gives students the opportunity to pursue an individual research project relating to an aspect of renewable energy – for the Bachelor of Science with Honours in Renewable Energy. Students will be given guidance and support from a supervisor.

30 pts • (C) RESE 452

2+3/3 • CRN 35100 • [Kelburn]

SWEN 421 – Formal Software Engineering

This course addresses the use of mathematical logic in the specification and construction for software systems. It presents an introduction to the area of formal methods; the formal specification of software systems; the refinement of specifications to code; and their semantic foundations.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 324 (or 224); 30 300-level pts from (COMP, SWEN)

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 422 – Human Computer Interaction

This course covers principles of human-computer interaction that underlie good design of software user interfaces. Advanced topics are introduced with a focus on current research areas.

15 pts • (P) one of (COMP 313, SWEN 303, 325).

1/3 • CRN 18662 • Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

SWEN 423 – Design: Patterns, Frameworks and Languages

Object-orientation is the basis for many different programming languages, frameworks and programming patterns. This course explores advanced topics in formal design techniques for OO Languages, OO Frameworks and OO Programming Patterns, and connects those formal designs with practical programming examples.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 225; 30 300-level COMP, CYBR, NWEN or SWEN pts

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 424 – Model-Driven Development

An introduction to model-driven development - the modern approach to large scale software system development along with an introduction to the core concepts of model-driven development, the course will address the foundations and principles for supporting infrastructures. This includes an in-depth discussion of 'metamodelling' and a critique of existing modelling techniques. Students will get hands-on experience with using a meta-case tool.

15 pts • (P) 30 300-level pts from (COMP, CYBR, NWEN, SWEN)

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 425 – Design Patterns

The course addresses a variety of advanced issues in Software Engineering, including the use for Software Patterns for software design.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 301, 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN or SWEN pts

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 426 – Advanced Software Implementation and Development

This course begins by covering issues relating to the successful implementation of a software design, including processes, metrics, the choice of programming language, the choice of implementation tools, coding styles, code reviews, and testing. The course also looks closely at the maintenance stage of softward development, and the issue of quality throughout the entire development process. Issues such as software quality assurance, configuration management and software process improvement are raised.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 301, 15 further 300-level AIML, COMP, CYBR, NWEN or SWEN pts; (X) SWEN 438 in 2020, 2021, 2023

2/3 • CRN 18666 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn]

SWEN 427 – Advanced Software Engineering: Requirements and Design

This course covers basic concepts and principles of software requirements engineering, its tools and techniques, including a survey of methods for modelling software requirements. The course also covers methods and techniques used in the design of software systems, including both architectural and detailed design. In the requirements and design areas issues such as documentation, reviews and inspections are covered.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 301, 15 further 300-level SWEN pts

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 428 – Protocols and Architecture for the Internet of Things

This course introduces the fundamental networking protocols and architectures used in the Internet of Things (IoT). In particular, the course will examine the latest protocols and protocol stacks for low power wireless networking in both short-range and long-range settings. It will include in-depth discussion of protocols and algorithms at various layers of the network stack including medium access control, network, application, as well as security aspects unique to IoT.

15 pts • (P) NWEN 241, 243; 60 300-level pts from (COMP, CYBR, ECEN, NWEN, SWEN) (X) NWEN 439 in 2020-2021

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 430 – Compiler Engineering

The course looks at a range of issues relating to the design and implementation of modern compilers. In particular, the course will focus on techniques and algorithms for code generation, code optimisation and type checking. During the course projects, students will be working on a fully-fledged compiler for a small imperative language. Students should expect to learn a great deal about how compilers work and, in particular, about the Java Bytecode and x86 instruction sets.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261 or SWEN 324 (or 224); 30 further 300-level points from (COMP, NWEN 303, SWEN)

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 431 – Advanced Programming Languages

This course applies a range of advanced contemporary programming languages in current use, covering practical programming skills in the languages as well as their niches and design paradigms. The course will cover languages of present industrial interest, along with design trends of future languages.

15 pts • (P) 30 300-level COMP or SWEN points (X) COMP 432

1/3 • CRN 18669 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 432 – Advanced Database Design and Implementation

This course explores a selection of the following topics: XML Databases, Cloud Databases, Data Warehouse and Object-Relational Databases. It examines features of these advanced database systems and analyses the new applications they facilitate.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 304, 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN or SWEN pts; (X) COMP 442, INFO 311

2/3 • CRN 18670 • Tue, Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

SWEN 433 – Web Information Systems Engineering

This course gives a technology-centered introduction to web information systems and services. On successful completion of the course students are able to explain basic concepts used in building and managing web information systems. They know central technological standards underlying web information systems and web services, understand architectural principles, and are able to evaluate and critically discuss such systems.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 304 or 435, 15 further 300-level COMP, CYBR, NWEN or SWEN pts

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 434 – Data Warehousing

This course considers theory, design and implementation of Data Warehouses.

15 pts • (P) SWEN 304, 15 further 300-level COMP, NWEN or SWEN pts; (X) COMP 444

Not offered in 2024

SWEN 435 – Database System Engineering

The course addresses fundamental principles underlying databases and database management systems. It covers the structure and principles of the relational data model, including SQL, and the principled design of the relational database schema. It also addresses issues in database transaction procession, concurrency control, recovery, and the complexity of query processing.

15 pts • (P) 60 300-level pts of COMP, NWEN, SWEN (X) SWEN 304, SWEN 439 in 2021-2022

1/3 • CRN 35116 • Mon, Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

SWEN 438 – Special Topic: Automated Program Analysis

The course will look at different techniques that can be used to automatically discover bugs and vulnerabilities in software. The course covers both static and dynamic techniques and discusses the pros and cons of various approaches. Students will develop their own program analyses, and learn how to use existing state-of-the-art tools.

15 pts • (P) COMP 261, 30 300-level points from COMP, CYBR, NWEN, SWEN

2/3 • CRN 18597 • Wed, Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

English Literature

ENGL 111 – Wild Civility: English Literature, 1380-1830

"Wild Civility" introduces some of the great English texts from the medieval to the Romantic period (1380-1830). It explores literature from the bawdy tales of Chaucer, to the drama and poetry of the age of Shakespeare, to the verse of the Romantic poet Keats. These texts provide a vivid insight into the literature of the past, its themes and techniques, and into the foundations of the English literary canon. The course also focuses on the essential reading skills which enable a student to understand and enjoy such works, and on the basic skills of academic writing.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 8017 • Mon, Tue 3-4pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 112 – Cultural Encounters: The Literature of Aotearoa New Zealand

Twenty-first century New Zealand literature in English has been shaped by a variety of cultures, literatures, traditions and practices: Māori, Pasifika, European, and Asian- from the tangata whenua to the various tangata tiriti. These encounters- on the page as well in society at large- have resulted in a contemporary literary scene that is innovative, exciting and challenging, breaking new ground in form and delivery as well as content. This course is an introduction to these contemporary voices.

20 pts • (X) THEA 112

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 114 – Popular Literature: Convention, Innovation and Resistance

This course examines five hundred years of popular literature, from the ballad to the graphic novel, focusing on the genres of romance, gothic, the detective story, and science fiction. Particular attention will be paid to the way that literary conventions are established, endorsed, modified and subverted.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 116 – Reading Shakespeare: An Introduction

ENGL 116 is an introduction to the reading of Shakespeare focused on close study of a single play with associated material. The main focus will be on understanding the text, with detailed attention to Shakespeare's language, imagery, and rhetoric, as well as to the play's themes and dramatic construction. The play will be opened out by study of related materials: sources, contemporary documents, parallel scenes from other plays, critical discussions, adaptions, and audio-visual versions of the play in performance. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 117 – Introduction to Narrative

How does fiction work? What happens when we approach the reading of fiction as an experience? What does it mean to respond to a voice crafted in prose? This course aims to provide students with some essential tools for the study of narrative. We read outstanding examples of prose fiction in order to think about fiction’s mechanics, and its ethics. How does attention to the craft of storytelling enhance our experience as readers- as well as writers- of fiction? Students will be introduced to the discipline of narratology by studying fiction’s organisation, effects, and rhetorical power.

20 pts

2/3 • CRN 17039 • Mon, Tue, Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

FHSS 103 – Great Ideas

Great Ideas is a course reflecting on some of the most exciting, important and revolutionary ideas that have shaped society and culture as it is today. It also considers how those ideas have an ongoing influence. It’s an interdisciplinary course looking at topics across the humanities, arts and social sciences.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 29008 • [Taught Online]

3/3 • CRN 29011 • [Taught Online]

LCCM 171 – The Art of Writing: Literary and Creative Communication

Even in a modern world dominated by visual and digital media, written communication remains the most essential and powerful tool not only in the university but in all social and professional contexts. This course draws on traditions of literary and creative writing to teach the skills of clear, persuasive, and imaginative written communication. You will analyse and create critical and personal forms of writing which may include the essay, the review, the blog, the social media post, the memoir and the polemic. The course complements the academic writing skills taught in WRIT 101.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 32025 • Mon 2-3pm [Kelburn]

LCCM 172 – Reading and Writing Poetry

The course teaches skills in both critical and creative reading and writing, through engagement with a wide range of poetry. You will explore the effects of concision, ornament, sentence structure, repetition, metre and form.

20 pts • (X) ENGL 172, FHSS 101 (2016–2018)

2/3 • CRN 33191 • Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-4pm [Kelburn]

CREW 253 – Poetry Workshop - He Rotarota

A workshop course in writing poetry which also involves wide reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

2/3 • CRN 9493 • ^ Mon 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 254 – Short Fiction Workshop - He Kōrero Paki

A workshop course in writing short fiction which also involves wide reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9495 • ^ Mon 2-5pm [Kelburn]

2/3 • CRN 9496 • ^ Fri 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 255 – Writing for the Young- He Tuhinga mā ngā Tamariki

A workshop course in writing for children which also involves wide reading of children's literature.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

Not offered in 2024

CREW 257 – Creative Nonfiction Workshop- He Kōrero Pono

A workshop course in writing creative nonfiction (e.g. memoirs, travel writing) which also involves representative reading in the genre.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts and an appropriate standard in written composition.

1/3 • CRN 9499 • ^ Fri 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 258 – Iowa Prose Workshop - He Tuhinga nō Tāwāhi

A topic in creative writing. Course materials will be an additional cost.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts, and an appropriate standard in written composition.

3/3 • CRN 17403 • ^ Tue, Thu 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 259 – Iowa Poetry Workshop - He Rotarota nō Tāwāhi

A topic in creative writing. Course materials will be an additional cost.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts, and an appropriate standard in written composition.

3/3 • CRN 17404 • ^ Tue, Thu 2-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

CREW 260 – Māori and Pasifika Creative Writing Workshop- Te Hiringa a Tuhi

This creative writing workshop is a practical paper for students who wish to produce fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry or scriptwriting which is informed by Māori or Pasifika perspectives, cultures and origins, the process of colonisation, or questions of identity and belonging. However, this is not a prescriptive list, and students are free to write creatively in ways that do not directly address these subjects. The writing workshop will form the heart of this course, with students also reading and discussing Māori, Pasifika and other writers of colour.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 200-level and approval of the Programme Director (X) CREW 256 (2014-2018)

2/3 • CRN 31060 • ^ Mon 10-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

ENGL 201 – Sea Changes: A History of English Literature

An exploration of the history of literature(s) in English, from the Anglo-Saxons to contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand. It is built around case studies of a series of major texts in their changing historical and cultural contexts, the texts being linked by the shared motif of voyages by sea.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 202 – Nineteenth-Century American Literature

This course will explore literature written in the territory that is now the United States of America as the new colonial nation expanded across the continent during the nineteenth century. We will focus in particular on literature by Indigenous, Black, and women writers that speaks to the promise, limits, and even contradictions of the emerging nation’s ideals. As we read a range of literary forms—from poetry and fiction to essays and autobiography—we will also examine how different forms of literacy shape self-expression and political agency.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 203 – Modernist Literature

A survey of British, Irish and American literature from 1899 to the Second World War. This course studies many of the major writers of the Modernist period and includes poetry, short stories, novels, plays, film and the visual arts. Particular attention will be paid to the historical context, including reactions to “primitivism”, Fordism and mass culture, feminism, the Depression, Irish politics and nationalism, and the emergence of fascism.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 28311 • Tue, Wed 9-10 [Kelburn], Fri 9-10 [Kelburn]

ENGL 208 – Shakespeare

A study of a group of plays by Shakespeare (and his contemporaries), focusing particularly on their treatment of gender difference and gender ambiguity. The plays will be approached both as literary texts and as scripts for stage performance and film adaptation. This course is also able to be taken towards a major in THEA.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) THEA 208

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 209 – The Realist Novel

The English novel from its beginnings to 1930, with special attention to a selection of major works. The lectures discuss the novel's general historical development, special areas of interest, and individual authors and works; tutorials give practice in the critical study of the form and text of major novels.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 211 – Science Fiction

Science Fiction as a literary genre from its beginnings to the present day, with special attention to a selection of canonical works. The lectures discuss Science Fiction’s general historical development, special areas of interest, and individual authors and works; tutorials give practice in the critical study of the form and text of major novels and short stories.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 32016 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

ENGL 225 – Classical Traditions in English Literature

An introduction to the influence of the classics (Greek and Roman) on English literature from the middle ages to the present. The course focuses on the transformations of some key classical myths and two classical genres. Classical texts are read in translation; no previous classical knowledge is assumed.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 228 – Special Topic: Dark and Stormy Nights:   Gothic Literature

This course traces the gothic from Romanticism up until the the present. Particular attention will be paid to how representations of monstrosity, haunting and sexual transgression have changed from the nineteenth century female gothic through fin-de-siècle decadence and American Southern Gothic to our own times. You will read novels which exemplify each of these historical moments as well as a number of short stories, and we will also explore other media such as painting, film, and popular culture. You will discover that the aestheticization of horror and dread is in part a response to social anxieties about race, gender, and class.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule.

2/3 • CRN 9185 • Mon, Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

ENGL 231 – Modern Poetry

What makes a poem 'modern'? How have poets in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries responded to the challenge of imaging the modern? Reading poets from Australia, Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, this course explores how modern poets negotiate the competing claims of writing in a tradition and establishing space for the new. Particular attention is given to questions of voice, lyric and anti-lyric, gender, sexuality, ‘race’ and racism.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 8614 • Tue, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 234 – New Zealand Literature

A thematic and historical study of New Zealand literature from the eighteenth century to the present focussing on such issues as: fantasies of place and encounter; the ecologies of the colonial world; cultural nationalism and literature as ‘a home in thought’; literature and transgression; writing as other; and the future of national literatures.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 244 – Children's Literature

The course introduces the study of children's literature through a substantial selection of texts by a range of recognised authors - normally including a New Zealand writer.

20 pts • (P) 20 100-level ENGL pts and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

LCCM 271 – Literature and Journalism

This course explores the relationship between English literature and journalism from the 18th to the 21st century. It considers questions of fact and fiction, objectivity, and style, across a range of genres. Students have the opportunity to produce creative work as part of the assessment.

20 pts • (P) 40 BC or BA points; (X) ENGL 248 2017- 2018

2/3 • CRN 33007 • Mon 10-11 [Kelburn]

LCCM 272 – The Art of the Essay: Critical, Public, Personal

Not merely a tool of academic assessment, the essay is an art form with a long and rich history in English and other literatures. This course analyses classic essays from the Renaissance to the 21st century, and uses these as models for students' own writing practice in both critical and personal essays in both traditional print and digital media.

20 pts • (P) 40 BC or BA points

Not offered in 2024

LCCM 273 – Digital Oceania: Writing the Pacific

The proliferation of digital media is pushing the boundaries of literary and creative communication in Oceania. This course is grounded in the digital and environmental humanities as it asks students to navigate Indigenous transformations of writing in Oceania. You will engage with digital modes of publication, including the phenomena of digital poetry, podcasts, virtual worlds, online communities, and online activism. You will hear from digital storytelling and archival experts, collaborate using digital tools, and develop your own creative and critical approaches to these literatures.

20 pts • (P) 40 BC or BA points

1/3 • CRN 33297 • Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn]

THEA 205 – Dramaturgies of the West

This course explores the development, theory, and practice of Western dramaturgy from Romanticism to the present. Dramaturgy is the study of how meaning is generated in drama and performance. Students will learn and practice a suite of analytic and synthetic skills associated with Western and text-based dramaturgy, and conduct performance-based research on selected plays. The course aims to a) develop familiarity with from the canons of modern and post-modern drama; b) equip students with knowledge and skills of dramaturgy; and c) provide students with a critical understanding of and practical experience in dramaturgical work. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 20 THEA pts or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) ENGL 341, THEA 305

Not offered in 2024

THEA 211 – From Whare Tapere to the Globe: Theatre of Aotearoa/New Zealand

A study of the diverse theatrical practices of theatre in Aotearoa New Zealand from the pre-colonial era to the present. There will be a core focus on how on how cultural identities have been formed and expressed through performance and playwriting. The course focuses on work from tangata whenua, diasporic and settler cultures across a variety of genres; from realist to devised, dance drama and street theatre.

20 pts • (P) 20 THEA pts or 40 pts from Part A of the BA schedule; (X) THEA 321

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 307 – Troy and Troilus

A close study of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, read in the context of its forerunners and successors, including Henryson's 'Testament of Cresseid', Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida, and Chaucer's source poem, the Italian Renaissance author Boccaccio's Il Filostrato (in translation). This course entails a close study of what has been called 'the greatest narrative poem in English', Chaucer's romantic tragedy Troilus and Criseyde. The poem will be read in the context of the other stories of Troy and Troilus that influenced Chaucer, or were influenced by him, particularly Shakespeare's play on the same subject. Chaucer's principal source, the Italian author Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, is read in translation.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 308 – Renaissance Literature

A study of early modern English poetry and drama from 1560-1680, the flowering of the Renaissance to the English Civil Wars. The course focuses on themes of love and friendship, conscience, selfhood, gender, society and the state. Focal texts are selected from a range of canonical and counter-canonical authors, and will include some of: Philip Sidney, Shakespeare, John Donne, John Webster, Anne Bradstreet, Andrew Marvell, Katherine Philips, Margaret Cavendish and John Milton.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 311 – Romantic Literature

This course will explore literature written in the Romantic period (1789-1832) and its afterlives. We will study the major canonical British writers of the period as well as Black and Indigenous writers who engaged with Romanticism and its legacies. The course will consider the interconnected global histories of colonisation and environmental degradation as influences on Romanticism, as well as questions of poetic voice, agency and canon-formation.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

1/3 • CRN 8630 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-11 [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 312 – Victorian Literature

This course examines a selection of fiction, non-fiction and poetry from the Victorian period, under the broad categories of gender and sexuality, religious doubt, and empire. It deals with such central nineteenth-century literary and cultural preoccupations as ‘the woman question’, the stereotype of woman as angel or demon; the implications modernity and, in particular, Darwinian theories of evolution for traditional belief; and the ways in which literature, variously, constructs, reinforces, and complicates the relationship of coloniser and Indigenous subject.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205,211.

2/3 • CRN 8631 • Tue, Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 313 – Early English Literature

This course explores early English literature—that is, literature written before the age of print (approximately from the 7th to the 15th centuries). It begins with texts written in Old English, looking in particular at the elegy and passages from the heroic poem Beowulf. The texts are read in Old English with parallel translations. The course then explores selections of Middle English poetry, including the romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, a selection of lyrics, and work by Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from ENGL 200–299, 20 further pts from CREW 200-299, ENGL 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 314 – The Chivalric Quest from Chaucer to Spenser

The Reformation was among other things a cultural revolution. This course examines its impact in England. It begins with late Middle English romances and includes one of the York mystery plays and medieval lyrics featuring Christ as knight and lover. These provide the context for a reading of Edmund Spenser’s post-Reformation masterpiece The Legend of the Knight of the Red Cross as a pseudo-medieval romance strongly reflective of the new ideology of the Reformation.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 315 – Restoration and 18th Century Literature

This course examines the literature of the eighteenth century, with particular attention to the changing role of the writer, the emergence of journalism and the novel, travel, colonisation and imperialism, and the connections between literature and politics.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 330 – Postcolonial Literature

This course considers the impact of colonialism on the development of modern literature, with a particular focus on texts responding to the colonisation of the Korean peninsula and the freedom movements resisting this colonisation. Students will read read 20th and 21st century texts, which are considered in the contexts of their historical and cultural production. Recent anti-colonial debates provide the theoretical framework for discussion.

20 pts • (P) (20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211) or GLBL 201

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 331 – New Zealand Literature

This course is organised into distinct and discrete modules, which may examine, in turn, a particular author or a recurrent literary motif or a particular genre or a singular text considered in terms of their significance within the corpus of New Zealand literature.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 332 – American Literature: Twentieth Century

This course will be concerned with studying the developments in American Literature, in prose and poetry, from the turn of the 20th century to the present. The course considers the impact of major literary movements of the 20th century, including Modernism, the Beats, Minimalism or "Dirty Realism", and the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poetry movement of the 1980s.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211

2/3 • CRN 8635 • Mon, Wed 2-3pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

ENGL 334 – Awkward Books

What leads people to ban, burn, censor, censure or generally revile works of literature? This course will investigate the relationship between literary fiction and ethics by reading a series of controversial novels written in the last hundred years against the context of their production and reception.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from ENGL 200-299, 20 further points from ENGL 200-299, CREW 200-299, THEA 205, 211 (X) ENGL 301; ENGL 348 in 2013–15;

Not offered in 2024

ENGL 336 – Literature of Ecology and Climate Change

This course will explore how contemporary fiction responds to climate change, and in particular the task of reimagining human relationships with the environment and the non-human. The course will investigate questions about systems of collective behaviour, modes of existing with (and without) other species, and forms of conceptualising catastrophic or alternative futures. Readings include contemporary literature from around the globe, as well as theoretical texts on literature and the environment.

20 pts • (P) (20 points from ENGL 200-299; 15 further points from BIOL 200-399, CREW 200-399, ENGL 200-299, GEOG 200-399, SCIS 200-399, THEA 205, 211) or GLBL 201 (X) ENGL 348 (2019, 2020)

1/3 • CRN 33117 • Tue, Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

LCCM 310 – Special Topic: Essays on the Precipice

This course asks, ‘What is the point of the creative essay?’ in a world transformed by climate change, ecological destruction, and extinction. We will examine creative non-fiction and literary texts and write original responses to a social and natural environment on the precipice of complex and bewildering destabilisation. Model readings will include essays of witness, reportage, and advocacy, personal and lyric essays, discontinuous essays, contemporary manifestos, and works of eco-philosophy and eco-absurdism.

20 pts • (P) 40 BC or BA points

1/3 • CRN 34056 • Thu 1-4pm [Kelburn]

LCCM 371 – Public Writing

In this course you will connect your literary and creative communication skills to writing that addresses the public sphere(s). You will look at classic and contemporary examples of public and political writing, from Wollstonecraft and Orwell to Te Punga Somerville and Teaiwa. You will also create your own advocacy projects, as you explore literary forms, rhetorical strategies, and linguistic devices frequently used when engaging with public audiences.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points from the BC or BA Schedule

2/3 • CRN 33298 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn]

LCCM 372 – Forms of Creative Communication: The Essay at Large

Developing the themes of LCCM 272 The Art of the Essay, this course offers advanced critical analysis and creative practice of more specialised forms of non-fictional written communication. Topics include digital writing (from the tweet to the multi-part serial essay literary journalism (profiles, opinion pieces, arts and media reviewing), travel writing, popular science writing, and (auto)biography. The course will include guest contributions from creative professionals and public intellectuals from outside the university.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level points from the BC or BA Schedule

Not offered in 2024

THEA 305 – Dramaturgies of the West

This course explores the development, theory, and practice of Western dramaturgy from Romanticism to the present. Dramaturgy is the study of how meaning is generated in drama and performance. Students will learn and practice a suite of analytic and synthetic skills associated with Western and text-based dramaturgy, and conduct performance-based research on selected plays. The course aims to a) develop familiarity with from the canons of modern and pot-modern drama; b) equip students with knowledge and skills of dramaturgy; and c) provide students with a critical understanding of and practical experience in dramaturgical work. Co-taught with THEA 205. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from THEA 201-299; (X) ENGL 241, THEA 205.

Not offered in 2024

Environmental Science

RESE 111 – Introduction to Renewable Energy Systems

This course provides an overview of the role of energy systems in sustainability, and the development trends, past and future, of different technologies. The ways in which the technologies influence industry, government, and society are examined from a range of different perspectives. Students will gain practical skills in energy generation and utilisation through a range of experiments, as well as skills in modelling renewable energy systems for different contexts. Mathematics and physics at NCEA level 3 are recommended, but not essential to take this course.

15 pts • (X) ENGR 111, ENGR 110 in 2019-2020

Not offered in 2024

RESE 211 – Renewable Energy Generation Systems

This course will expose the students to the different energy generation systems, and especially those that utilise renewable resources: wind energy (pumping and power), geothermal, hydro (different scales), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and bioenergy. For each system, the theoretical underpinning will be examined; for example, optical physics to harness solar radiation in a concentrating solar technology. The life cycle (sustainability) implications of the different systems will also be explored, including manufacturing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 110 or RESE 111; ENGR 121 (or MATH 141 and 151); ENGR 141 ((or PHYS 114 or 101) and (CHEM 114 or 122))

Not offered in 2024

RESE 212 – Renewable Energy Conversion and Storage

This course will provide the students with insight into technologies to convert generated energy into useful fuels or power in the economy and society. It will specifically focus on bioenergy conversion processes, such as gasification, pyrolysis and torrefaction; chemical storage (solid-state and liquid batteries); and pumped and mechanical storage. For each technology platform the underlying physics and chemistry will be examined, with related practical experiments in the laboratory. The life cycle (sustainability) implications of the different,= technologies will also be explored, including manufacturing.

15 pts • (P) ENGR 110 or RESE 111; ENGR 121 (or MATH 141 and 151); ENGR 141 (or (PHYS 114 or 101) and (CHEM 114 or 122))

Not offered in 2024

ENSC 301 – Topics in Environmental Science

Topics in environmental science that may include: environmental toxicology, Antarctica and environmental change, greenhouse effect environmental risk assessment, mathematical modelling of environmental problems; human health and ecology, atmosphere and ocean dynamics and natural resource management. This course will allow students to integrate their science discipline into an environmental framework and discuss, analyse and apply these ideas.

20 pts • (P) 90 pts of 200-level study in approved subjects from the Science schedule; (C) ENSC 302 or 303 and admission to the major in Environmental Science.

1/3 • CRN 18345 • Mon 12-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn], Fri 10-1pm [Kelburn]

ENSC 302 – Directed Individual Study

20 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School.

2/3 • CRN 18346 • Tue, Thu 12-3pm [Kelburn]

ENSC 303 – Directed Individual Study

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School.

Not offered in 2024

RESE 311 – Energy Economic Analyses

This course introduces principles of economics, and how they relate to energy systems, specifically reflecting on the energy-economic nexus. It explores practical techniques to analyse the micro- and macro-economic implications of transitions in the energy system along with relevant business and financial analysis techniques. It presents an overview of the Resource Management Act and related aspects for engineering projects, such as Environmental Impact Assessments.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212; one of (STAT 193, QUAN 102, ECEN 321)

Not offered in 2024

RESE 312 – Sustainability Modelling Techniques

This course introduces various approaches to analyse the sustainability of systems, such as cost-benefit analysis, life cycle analysis, and simulation modelling techniques, with a focus on system dynamics modelling. Practical work explores simulation using an industry- standard software package and a project to model and investigate the sustainability implications of an implemented renewable energy technology in a specific context; for example, a bioenergy system in an island community.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212

Not offered in 2024

RESE 321 – Renewable Energy Generation Engineering

This course introduces a range of different energy generation systems, and especially those that utilise renewable resources: wind energy (pumping and power), geothermal, hydro (at different scales), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and bioenergy. For each technology, the theoretical underpinning is examined – for example, optical physics to harness solar radiation in concentrating solar systems – and the engineering approaches to identify and design efficiency improvements for such systems are established.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203, 204 (X) RESE 211

1/3 • CRN 34007 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 322 – Renewable Energy Storage Engineering

This course provides insights into technologies that convert renewable energy generation into useful fuels or power in the economy and society. It will include bioenergy conversion processes, such as gasification, pyrolysis and torrefaction; chemical storage (solid-state and liquid batteries); thermal storage; and pumped and mechanical storage. It examines the underlying physics and chemistry for each technology platform, with related practical experiments in the laboratory. The engineering approaches to identify and design efficiency improvements for such systems are established.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203, 204; (X) RESE 212

Not offered in 2024

RESE 323 – Renewable Energy Policy

This course provides an overview of the policy context of renewable energy, consisting of the regulatory, institutional, and market setting for renewable energy technologies. It explores the sustainability of the technologies from the perspectives of policy-makers and other stakeholders. The course equips students with the means to assess, identify, and prioritise renewable energy technologies from the perspectives of various stakeholders, as well as decision-making tools to promote appropriate and sustainable renewable energy technologies from a policy perspective.

15 pts • (P) RESE 211, 212

Not offered in 2024

CCSP 401 – Physical Basis of Climate Change

Students will learn elementary radiative transfer physics, energy balance, concepts of climate forcing, feedback and response. Some elements of planetary circulation will be covered, along with modes of variability. Carbon, methane and nitrogen cycles will be covered in support of understanding the relationship between emissions and concentrations. Introductory atmospheric, oceanic and cryosphere physics will be taught. Topics to be covered include: observations of the atmosphere, ocean, carbon cycle and cryosphere; earth system models and their performance; modes of variability; patterns of forcing, feedback and response; and emergent patterns of change.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

1/3 • CRN 30159 • Mon 12-2pm [Kelburn]

CCSP 402 – Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

This course will provide participants with high-level understanding of climate change impacts and adaptation at global, national and local scales. Climate prediction models will be used to examine social and biophysical vulnerabilities to environmental change, and explore policies and measures to minimise impacts, and the potential for adaptation at different scales. Topics include: global and local implications of climate change impacts and adaptation, implications (and risks) of a variable and changing climate on particular societies, models, feedback processes and uncertainties; adaptation strategies; categories of adaptation; Māori knowledge and values related to adaptation, information and communication; public engagement.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30160 • Mon 10-12 [Kelburn]

CCSP 403 – International Climate Change Policy

This course provides an overview of international climate policy, drawing on policy-relevant physical climate change science, economics, game theory, ethics, and international relations theory relevant for climate policy. At the end of the course students will understand and be able to critically analyse key decision-relevant aspects of climate change science and environmental economics, as well as the history, theory and prospects of landmark efforts to govern climate change, domestically and internationally.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30161 • Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

CCSP 404 – Climate Change Mitigation

An examination of the domestic and international policy issues surrounding climate change mitigation, including why mitigation represents a challenging social and economic as well as environmental problem; differing perspectives on policy solutions to the mitigation challenge; linkages with international policy; policies and behaviour change; the roles of relevant institutions; sectoral considerations and policy measures; policy communication, and the politics of mitigation strategies.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School

2/3 • CRN 30162 • Thu 1-3pm [Kelburn]

CCSP 405 – Climate Policy: Carbon Pricing Mechanisms

This course introduces the policy and institutional dimensions of carbon pricing. Putting a price on carbon creates incentives for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This market-based approach has important implications for climate change mitigation. The lectures will cover major international, national, and private-sector initiatives that involve carbon pricing, with a focus on those linked with an emission trading system. Cases from the United Nations, European Union, China, Australia, New Zealand, and other parts of the world will be presented and discussed.

15 pts • (P) Permission of Head of School; (X) GEOG 407 in 2019-2021

Not offered in 2024

CCSP 408 – Special Topic: Emerging Topics in Climate Change in Aotearoa New Zealand and the Pacific

An applied overview of the practical aspects of addressing climate change in relevant government agencies and organisations in Aotearoa New Zealand and the wider Pacific. This course is delivered through public research seminars from guest speakers in government, industry, and academia. Students will gain valuable insights into the dynamic and evolving landscape of climate change governance and adaptation and mitigation strategies.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 36128 • Tue 2-4pm [Kelburn]

RESE 411 – Power Systems Analysis

This course introduces the electricity industry and its components along with techniques for modern electric power system modelling and analysis. Topics include transmission line models, transformers and per unit systems, generator models, network matrices, power flow analysis and computation, real and reactive power control, voltage control, and protection. The course incorporates lab and simulation based exercises, an industrial tour, and an industrial project.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 313 or (C) RESE 413

2/3 • CRN 31173 • Wed, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

RESE 412 – Advanced Development of RE Systems

This course presents techniques used to design advanced, integrated renewable energy solutions for given situations. The hardware and control enabling renewable energy systems to interact with a wider grid are presented along with topologies such as nano- and micro-grids. To supplement the technical content, this course presents the concepts of systems engineering, which introduces systems thinking principles.

15 pts • (P) (EEEN 313, 315) or (C) (one of RESE 421, 431)

1/3 • CRN 31165 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

RESE 413 – Power Electronics and Electrical Machines

This course covers the theory, design and and application of electrical machines, power electronic circuits, electric drives, and the transformation and control of electrical energy. The course introduces the fundamentals of power electronics and electrical machines, and discusses the design issues related to electrical drives and small-scale power generation. Practical work will involve the design, development, and implementation of solutions to drive motors, convert renewable power, and switch mode power amplifiers.

15 pts • (P) EEEN 203, EEEN 204 (X) EEEN 313, EEEN 405, ECEN 405

2/3 • CRN 35092 • [Kelburn]

RESE 421 – Energy Economic Analyses

This course introduces principles of economics, and how they relate to energy systems, specifically reflecting on the energy-economic nexus. It explores practical techniques to analyse the micro- and macro-economic implications of transitions in the energy system, along with relevant business and financial analysis techniques. It applies the principles and techniques to analyse a real-world topic to inform decision- or policy-making with appropriate conclusions and recommendations.

15 pts • (C) (one of RESE 423, 431, 412) (X) RESE 311

1/3 • CRN 35093 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 422 – Sustainability Modelling Techniques

This course introduces various approaches to analyse the sustainability of systems, such as cost-benefit analysis, and simulation modelling techniques. It then focuses more deeply on system dynamics modelling and life cycle analysis. Practical work explores simulations using industry-standard software packages and a project to model and investigate the sustainability implications of a renewable energy intervention in the economy – to develop a policy brief.

15 pts • (P) One of (RESE 423, 431, 412) (X) RESE 312

2/3 • CRN 35094 • Tue 11-12 [Kelburn], Tue 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 423 – Case studies of RE Systems

This course provides an overview of the role of energy systems in sustainability, and the development trends, past and future, of different technologies. The ways in which the technologies influence industry, government, and society are examined from a range of different perspectives, by focussing on specific, real-world case studies. Students will also gain practical skills in modelling renewable energy systems for different contexts, by utilising standard industry software packages.

15 pts • (C) One of (RESE 431, RESE 421)

Not offered in 2024

RESE 431 – RE Systems Generation

This course introduces a range of different energy generation systems, and especially those that utilise renewable resources: wind energy (pumping and power), geothermal, hydro (different scales), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, and bioenergy. For each technology, the theoretical underpinning is examined with related practical experiments in the laboratory. Approaches to identify and conceptualise efficiency improvements for such systems are established. A practical project is undertaken to conceptualise and demonstrate an improved energy generation system for a real-world context.

15 pts • (X) RESE 321

1/3 • CRN 35096 • Wed 11-12 [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 432 – RE Storage and Conversion

This course provides insights into technologies that convert renewable energy generation into useful fuels or power in the economy and society. It will include bioenergy conversion processes, chemical storage (solid-state and liquid batteries), thermal storage, and pumped and mechanical storage. It examines the underlying physics and chemistry for each technology platform with related practical experiments in the laboratory. Approaches to identify and conceptualise efficiency improvements for such systems are established. A practical project is undertaken to conceptualise and demonstrate an improved energy storage system for a real-world context.

15 pts • (X) RESE 322

Not offered in 2024

RESE 451 – Research methods for RE systems (theory)

This course covers the theory and practice of undertaking research. The nature and process of quantitative and qualitative research approaches are explored to enable students to formulate and conduct a research effort to find answers to specific problems related to renewable energy. Topics that will be covered include: the aims of research; the research topic, project title, and research problem; literature review types; population and sampling types; types of quantitative and qualitative research designs; data-collecting methods and measuring instruments in quantitative and qualitative research; data analysis and interpretation of results; and validity of conclusions.

15 pts • (C) one of (RESE 421, 431, 412)

1/3 • CRN 35098 • Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 452 – Research methods for RE systems (project)

This course applies the research theory – from RESE 451 – to a specific renewable energy related, real-world problem that is identified. It explores and applies practical methods to undertake in-depth, critical analyses of the literature to derive the research rationale, objectives/questions, and strategy, as well as grounding the theory and engineering or analytical methods, and the related gaps in knowledge, that are applicable to the identified research problem. Practical workshops are undertaken to instil academic writing techniques that are applied to writing a research proposal and a supporting research article.

15 pts • (P) RESE 451

2/3 • CRN 35099 • Thu 12-1pm [Kelburn]

RESE 487 – Research Project

This course gives students the opportunity to pursue an individual research project relating to an aspect of renewable energy – for the Bachelor of Science with Honours in Renewable Energy. Students will be given guidance and support from a supervisor.

30 pts • (C) RESE 452

2+3/3 • CRN 35100 • [Kelburn]

CCSP 510 – Research Essay

This major research project gives the student scope to investigate a climate related topic of particular interest, and centres on writing and presenting an extended research essay of up to 15,000 words. The investigation will relate to a research question concerning an aspect of climate change science or policy, broadly interpreted. It will consist of a review of the literature, some primary research and analysis, and the leading of a seminar to share understanding of the project’s outcomes with fellow students.

60 pts • (P) Completion of Part 1 and Part with at least B+ average or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 30163 [Kelburn]

CCSP 511 – Practicum Placement and Project

This course has three components: a placement, a research project, and presentation of a seminar. The placement is a period of work with an employer in the field of climate change science, policy or management (e.g. climate-related transport research or policy formulation). The short research project aims to research a particular aspect of the work undertaken, or the host organisation itself, to enrich the student’s understanding of the organisation’s work. A seminar aims to share understanding among fellow students of the role of the host organisation.

60 pts • (P) Completion of Part 1 and Part 2 with at least B+ average or permission of Head of School

3/3 • CRN 30164 • [Kelburn]

Environmental Studies

GEOG 114 – Sustainability: People and Environment

This course focuses on the relationships between people and the (natural and built) environment. We examine a range of contemporary ways of thinking about these relationships, using local and international examples. This course brings together the social and physical sciences to help understand key environmental issues and work towards possible solutions.

15 pts • (X) ENVI 114

1/3 • CRN 7021 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 214 – Environmental Futures for Aotearoa New Zealand

This course broadly maps human-nature relationships throughout human history in Aotearoa New Zealand. You will focus on how our relationships as part of the natural world, and our perspectives of them, manifest environmental values and ethics that become embedded in environmental management systems, policy and legislation. By mapping this, the course builds your sense of agency and purpose in Aotearoa New Zealand’s environmental future.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 114 or GLBL 101 or 15 approved points (X) ENVI 214

2/3 • CRN 6004 • Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

SCIE 212 – To be confirmed

15 pts

Not offered in 2024

GEOG 313 – Geographies of New Zealand

GEOG 313 studies human geographies of New Zealand, including demography, historical geography, political economy, economic geography, industrial geography, rural geography, social geography and urban geography, in both historical and contemporary settings. For final year students it will advance their knowledge of contemporary geographical processes in the New Zealand environment. For foreign, exchange or graduate students it will give them an advanced introduction to geographical context of the country in which they are studying. See course content information for dates.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level GEOG pts or approved courses for non-GEOG majors (X) GEOG 311

3/3 • CRN 18579 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9-12 [Kelburn]

GEOG 314 – Global Environmental Justice

All environmental problems have human dimensions. Throughout this course, we will build an understanding of environmental issues as social issues by focussing on environmental justice. We will explore the causes of environmental problems, how problems are understood and experienced by different populations, and how communities work towards fairer environmental futures.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 214 or GLBL 201 (X) ENVI 314

2/3 • CRN 6011 • Mon, Thu 10-11 [Kelburn]

Fashion Design Technology

DSDN 101 – Design Visualisation / Pohewatanga ā-Hoahoa

This course will use a range of visualisation methods to represent design concepts and elements. Methods used include hand drawing, photography, motion graphics, animation and video.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17120 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 102 – Game, Animation and Motion Design / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu, ā-Pakiwaituhi, ā-Ranga

This course will introduce students to basic principles of game design, animation and motion design. Fundamental game design concepts, such as mechanics and loops, will be explored and analysed to enable students to conceptualise and develop playable games. Alongside game design this course also introduces introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery and graphic animation.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 34100 • [Te Aro]

DSDN 103 – Critical Approaches to Design Communication/ Tukanga Arohaehae Kōrero ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to the role of visual and written communication in contemporary design practice. A range of techniques will be taught to help students communicate design concepts, critical thinking, and design processes to develop and clearly articulate their creative ideas and observations.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 34118 • Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 104 – Digital Fabrication / Waihanga Matihiko

In this course students engage with emerging technologies to visualise and create 3D forms, bodies and spaces. Students address the distinctive features of creating form and making digitally fabricated artefacts.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17152 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 111 – Design Composition / Hanganga ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to, and develops their fluency in, design vocabularies and composition specific to the configuration of design elements. Analogue and digital techniques are used to explore body, space, form and movement.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17123 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 132 – Design Narratives and Visual Storytelling / Paki ā-Hoahoa me te Pakiwaitara ā-Ataata

This course introduces students to narratives and storytelling in the context of visual design. Students will be exposed to a range of traditional and contemporary examples including Māori storytelling practice and examples from film, animation, digital and physical games and comics. Students will explore and apply the principles, structures and techniques introduced in class through linear and non-linear storytelling exercises.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

2/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 141 – Design Mediums and Processes / Ngā Huarahi me Ngā Tukanga ā-Hoahoa

This course focuses on creative exploration of materials and processes. Students will learn various manual and digital techniques and apply these to the exploration and production of expressive forms.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17126 • Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding and AI I / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding and AI for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design and Photography / Hoahoa Whakanikoniko me te Whakaahuatanga

This course explores the basics of graphic design and photography through hands-on projects. Students are introduced to professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of visual works that express visual identity and voice.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30061 • Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 33344 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 153 – Fashion Systems and Ecologies / Pūnaha me te Hauropi ā-Kākahu

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Tue 1.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 171 – Design in a Global Context / Hoahoa i te Horopaki o te Ao Whānui

By observing and analysing historical approaches and responses in and between cultures and design, students will explore design from a place-based perspective.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17129 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Wed 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31178 • [Distance]

DSDN 172 – Whakapapa Design I

This course is deeply rooted in Māori culture. Whakapapa Design emphasises ethical behaviour and the consequences of our actions as designers. Whakapapa Design highlights interconnections between people, place, and all living entities and offers a path to restore the health and well-being of both people and the planet through narrative, making, language, and shared values. Whakapapa Design is guided by the Māori tikanga; whakawhanaungatanga and manaakitanga.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30062 • Mon 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

COMD 211 – Drawing I / Tuhi Pikitia I

This course will allow students to practice traditional and contemporary approaches to both observational and imaginative drawing. In addition to building on skills and techniques developed in earlier courses, students will be encouraged to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 30073 • ^ Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

Not offered in 2024

FADN 201 – Fashion Design Studio I / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu I

In this intermediate course students will learn the principles of fashion design by trialling various pattern design and manufacturing techniques in the development of sustainable wearable forms. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique and ethically focused design position.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 32117 • ^ Mon, Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

FADN 202 – Fashion Design Studio II / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu II

This intermediate course will extend on the principles of fashion design covered in FADN 201 with an emphasis on digital tools. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion will be discussed, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), providing students a context for developing a unique design position.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including FADN 201

2/3 • CRN 32115 • Mon, Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

FADN 242 – Generative Textiles / Ngā Papanga ā-Waihanga

Using generative approaches to textile design informed by broad cultural contexts and/or emerging technologies, students taking this course will explore the systemised creation of textiles. Students will be exposed to a range of software, manufacturing and production techniques to create artefacts using a constructive rather than restrictive set of rules.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

Not offered in 2024

FADN 273 – Fashion in Society / Kākahu i te Papori

Across human history, fashion has played an important role in every aspect of culture: religious order, social status, occupational position and rank, personal freedom (or lack thereof) and rejection of the status quo. In this course students will analyse precedents as well as cross-cultural examples, including Mātauranga Māori, that reveal the nuanced socio-political narratives embodied in the garments and objects that people wear.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

3/3 • CRN 32123 • tba [Distance]

INDN 252 – Physiology Codes / Ngā Waehere ā-Mātai Whaiaroaro

This course examines the dynamic complexity of the human body and its form, mapping personal variation, movement and anatomy as the inspiration for products. 3D scanning and colour 3D printing will be used to collect data and create a tailored product.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 17199 • ^ Tue 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 231 – Physical Computing / Rorohiko ā-Ōkiko

Introduction to electronics, circuit design, and programming as design tools for creative electronic solutions. This course is for students wishing to explore physical computing and interaction design (including IoT). Thinking beyond the mouse/keyboard/screen paradigm, simple techniques using microcontrollers and sensors will be taught to build smart objects and systems.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 142 or COMP 102 and 60 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules; (X) MDDN 251

2/3 • CRN 32170 • ^ Tue, Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

FADN 301 – Fashion Design Studio Ill / Taupuni Waihanga Kākahu Ill

In this course students will explore various design and production methods used in fashion design and wearable technology. Students will be encouraged to use digital manufacturing techniques as well as traditional and/or experimental elements incorporating a range of textile properties. Current issues critical to the domain of fashion and wearables will be discussed.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including FADN 202

1/3 • CRN 33024 • Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 321 – Character and Costume Design / Hoahoa ā-Kahu Whakaari

In this course students will investigate the narrative potential of wearable items through hands-on production as well as cultural study and research, including the historical significance of Māori fashion in Aotearoa. Examples from the professional domain will be discussed, including costume and character design for stage, presentation, performance art and film, and digital costumes in VR, animation and game design.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 33016 • Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

FADN 331 – Wearable Technology / Hangarau Hei Kākahu Mau

Students will explore the field of wearable technology through research and practical experimentation. They will learn how to use various technologies to create successful reactive and interactive wearable projects.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 142 and 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules (X) MDDN 331, 351

Not offered in 2024

FADN 341 – High Performance Fashion and Wearables / Kākahu Whai Tikanga me Ngā Kākahu Hei Mau

In this course students will investigate the design of garments, uniforms and equipment that are subject to extreme levels of stress by the performer and/or the environment. Students will be introduced to topics that include design for sport, hazardous occupations and for people with disabilities, emphasising a variety of traditional and newly emerging fabrics and materials. Through project work students will address one or more of these special instances of worn designs.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

Not offered in 2024

FADN 390 – Fashion Design Technology Capstone/ Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hangarau Hoahoa ā-Kākahu

This course leads students through a phased capstone project in which students learn to integrate skills, concepts, and approaches covered in the Fashion Design Technology major. Students will develop their unique focus through a research-informed project that critically engages with how fashion relates to contemporary issues facing society. Emphasis will be placed on students seeing every aspect of the fashion system as an opportunity and necessity to engage through design.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371, FADN 301

2/3 • CRN 33010 • Wed, Fri 10-12.30 [Te Aro]

INDN 321 – Interactive Products / Ngā Hua Hei Pāhekohekotanga

Students will investigate real-world issues through interaction design methodologies to identify problems, needs and desires that can be addressed through physical and digital interactions. Students will learn to design scenarios and prototype interactions through quick 4D sketching. Students will work in participatory teams to apply tools for testing their designs and develop professional documentation skills using video.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including either 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or one of (MARK 203, COMP 313, EEEN 302 (or ECEN 302), PSYC 232 (or PSYC 325))

Not offered in 2024

INDN 332 – Future Under Negotiation / Te Matapaki i te Anamata

This course explores industrial design from a historic, contemporary and future (speculative) perspective with a specific focus on the implications of technological evolution. Emerging issues such as artificial intelligence, biological printing and climate change will be explored through design experiments and scenario building.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 28189 • ^ Tue 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

IXXN 341 – Design for Health / Hoahoa kia Whai Hauora

This course introduces students to the wide range of opportunities for design to inform healthcare products and services. The course includes introduction to methods for working with clinicians and patients and how to design physical devices and digital interactions to address specific physiological requirements for a range of health conditions.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 30067 • Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

Film

FILM 101 – Introduction to Film Analysis

This course examines how cinema creates meaning through formal elements such as narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound and editing. It introduces students to key concepts and terms in Film Studies. It develops their textual analysis skills and explores different practices of interpretation.

20 pts

1/3 • CRN 9914 • Tue 10-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 10-12 [Kelburn]

tut tba

FILM 102 – Film Movements and Contexts

This course involves a critical exploration of several important stages in the history of cinema. These periods will be examined within a range of artistic, cultural, historical, material and/or theoretical contexts.

20 pts • (X) FILM 231

2/3 • CRN 26086 • Mon 10-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 11-1pm [Kelburn]

FILM 201 – Critical Approaches to Film Studies

This course involves a survey of the significant theoretical approaches that inform Film Studies. Topics will vary from year to year but may include realism, formalism, semiotics, narratology, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, and/or postmodernism. In 2023, this course focuses on the cinema and visual culture of Aotearoa New Zealand.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 331

Not offered in 2024

FILM 202 – Cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand

This course focuses on the cinema and visual culture of Aotearoa New Zealand from different cultural, aesthetic, historical, industrial and economic perspectives.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231) or GLBL 101; (X) FILM 237, FILM 201 in 2023

Not offered in 2024

FILM 203 – Film Cultures A

This course is a study of a film culture or linked film cultures that are fostered through shared production, distribution and exhibition practices and that emerge from particular cultural or subcultural contexts. It explores the relationship of film and culture across national/transnational or cross-cultural frames.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 233

Not offered in 2024

FILM 204 – Documentary Histories

This course investigates the documentary mode in a range of historical contexts from its early history and its relationship with the avant-garde to the current prevalence of documentary in multiple forms and contexts.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 233 in 2013

1/3 • CRN 26089 • Tue 3-5pm [Kelburn]

FILM 205 – Film Genre

This course will examine one or more film genres from an aesthetic, historical, cultural, and/or economic perspective.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 338

1/3 • CRN 26090 • Mon 12-3pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-2pm [Kelburn]

FILM 206 – Hollywood Cinema

In this course we will examine one or more periods of Hollywood cinema from an aesthetic, historical, cultural, and/or economic perspective.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 234 and FILM 334 in 2013

2/3 • CRN 26091 • Mon 2-5pm [Kelburn], Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn]

FILM 210 – Introduction to Film Production

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop practical skills in production including directing, cinematography, editing and sound. It involves both individual and collaborative production exercises as well as script development assignments. Please note that in order to be considered for this limited entry course, your enrolment application must submitted by 1 December in the year prior to enrolment.

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102 (or 231); (X) FILM 222

2/3 • CRN 26085 • ^ Tue 11-1pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FILM 220 – Special Topic: Web Series Production

This practical course will explore the ideation and production processes of short web series. Students will develop, produce, and post-produce a complete mini web series in small production groups. 

20 pts • (P) FILM 101 or 102

3/3 • CRN 26092 • ^ Tue, Thu 1-5pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FILM 301 – Current Issues in Film Studies

This course will focus on significant contemporary debates and theoretical issues in Film Studies. Topics will vary.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts in FILM at 200-level

Not offered in 2024

FILM 302 – Cinema and Representation

This course examines how cinema represents issues such gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality and/or class in a critical manner.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts or 40 PASI pts; (X) FILM 336

Not offered in 2024

FILM 303 – Pacific Cinema

This course focuses on Pacific cinema from a range of cultural, aesthetic, historical, industrial and/or economic perspectives. Topics may vary from year to year. In 2016 the course will focus on colonial/settler visual and literary representations of the Pacific, largely focusing on Polynesia. It will then turn to contemporary indigenous films/TV shows and other visual material and some literature from the Pacific region which engages or reworks representational histories of the Pacific.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from (FILM 200-299, PASI 200-399)

Not offered in 2024

FILM 304 – Film Cultures B

This course is an advanced study of a film culture or linked film cultures that are fostered through shared production, distribution and exhibition practices and that emerge from particular cultural or subcultural contexts. It explores the relationship of film and culture across national/transnational or cross-cultural frames.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 233, 333 in 2011-13

1/3 • CRN 26096 • Mon 3-6pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-5pm [Kelburn]

FILM 305 – Cinemedia

This course examines the relationships between cinema and other media in a variety of contexts. Topics may include analogue and/or digital technologies, animation, 3D, and/or multiple platforms. FILM 305 provides students with opportunities to develop practical skills in production alongside critical skills.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts

Not offered in 2024

FILM 306 – The Art of Film

This course examines the artistic dimensions of cinema at an advanced level. It may focus on specific film styles, aspects of the medium, individual directors, avant-garde and experimental cinema, or historical trends.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 238

Not offered in 2024

FILM 307 – Film Institutions, Industries, and Cultures

The course focuses on the field of film in its cultural, institutional and industrial contexts. This may include consideration of cinema as industry; the cultures and practices of film and related creative industries; or the role and influence of cultural policies and institutions.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts

Not offered in 2024

FILM 308 – Contemporary Debates in Cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand

This course involves an advanced study of the cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand with an emphasis on contemporary critical debates.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts

2/3 • CRN 26100 • Tue 2-5pm [Kelburn], Thu 2-4pm [Kelburn]

FILM 310 – Short Film Production

This course involves a practical study of the creative and technical aspects of film production. Students will make a short dramatic film in small groups. This will develop their skills at scripting, photography, mise-en-scene, performance, editing, sound recording and mixing. Please note that in order to be considered for this limited entry course, your enrolment application must be submitted by 1 December in the year prior to enrolment.

30 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 332

1/3 • CRN 26083 • ^ Tue 9-12 [Kelburn], Thu 12-3pm [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FILM 311 – Documentary Film Production

A critical and practical study of documentary filmmaking. Documentary Film Production aims to provide students with a broad understanding of the forms and styles of documentary. The course will focus on stylistic and structural aspects of the documentary form as a basis from which to inform the productions produced within the class. Please note that in order to be considered for this limited entry course, your enrolment application must be submitted by 1 December in the year prior to enrolment.

30 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts; (X) FILM 335

2/3 • CRN 26084 • ^ Wed 9-12 [Kelburn], Fri 9-12 [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FILM 312 – Topics in Film Praxis

This course uses hands-on film production techniques to explore topics in film. Possible topics include national cinemas, film genres, historical film movements and/or film theories.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts

1/3 • CRN 34010 • Thu 9-12 [Kelburn], Fri 9-11 [Kelburn]

Finance

FINA 101 – Finance for Business

An introduction to the principles of finance and their application to issues facing businesses and individual investors. Extensive use will be made of spreadsheets.

15 pts • (X) FINA 201, 202, 211

Not offered in 2024

FINA 101 – Finance for Business

An introduction to the principles of finance and their application to issues facing businesses and individual investors. Extensive use will be made of spreadsheets.

15 pts • (X) FINA 201, 202, 211

Not offered in 2024

FINA 201 – Introduction to Corporate Finance

An introduction to the fundamental concepts in corporate finance. Topics include the net present value method, alternative investment rules, capital budgeting, and the theories of capital structure.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 141 (or 140), QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151); (X) FINA 211

1/3 • CRN 18176 • Tue 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea], Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 201 – Introduction to Corporate Finance

An introduction to the fundamental concepts in corporate finance. Topics include the net present value method, alternative investment rules, capital budgeting, and the theories of capital structure.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 141 (or 140), QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151); (X) FINA 211

FINA 202 – Introduction to Investments

An introduction to the institutions, markets and instruments of the financial system, as well as the theory and practice of asset valuation and portfolio selection.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 141 (or 140), QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

2/3 • CRN 18177 • Wed, Fri 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 202 – Introduction to Investments

An introduction to the institutions, markets and instruments of the financial system, as well as the theory and practice of asset valuation and portfolio selection.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, 141 (or 140), QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

FINA 203 – Applied Finance

This course applies finance theories to problems involving corporate and personal financial decision making, and the principles of valuation to common situations. Extensive use will be made of spreadsheets.

15 pts • (P) FINA 101 or 201 or 211

Not offered in 2024

FINA 203 – Applied Finance

This course applies finance theories to problems involving corporate and personal financial decision making, and the principles of valuation to common situations. Extensive use will be made of spreadsheets.

15 pts • (P) FINA 101 or 201 or 211

Not offered in 2024

FINA 211 – Corporate Finance for Accounting and Business

An introduction to the fundamental concepts in corporate finance for accounting and business. Topics include net present value, alternative investment rules, capital budgeting, capital structure and long-term financing.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); (X) FINA 201

1/3 • CRN 27048 • Tue 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea], Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 211 – Corporate Finance for Accounting and Business

An introduction to the fundamental concepts in corporate finance for accounting and business. Topics include net present value, alternative investment rules, capital budgeting, capital structure and long-term financing.

15 pts • (P) ECON 130, QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); (X) FINA 201

FINA 301 – Corporate Finance

Significant aspects of financial decision making by firms, including capital structure, capital budgeting, and dividend decisions. The primary focus will be upon normative theory, i.e. decisions that maximise the market value of the firm.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) MOFI 301

1/3 • CRN 18053 • Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea], Wed 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 301 – Corporate Finance

Significant aspects of financial decision making by firms, including capital structure, capital budgeting, and dividend decisions. The primary focus will be upon normative theory, i.e. decisions that maximise the market value of the firm.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) MOFI 301

FINA 302 – International Corporate Finance

This course examines exchange rate behaviour and the implications for corporate financial management. Topics include modelling exchange rate behaviour; foreign exchange risk management, with applications to international debt raising, financial management, and hedging exchange rate risk; and international portfolio choice.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201

Not offered in 2024

FINA 302 – International Corporate Finance

This course examines exchange rate behaviour and the implications for corporate financial management. Topics include modelling exchange rate behaviour; foreign exchange risk management, with applications to international debt raising, financial management, and hedging exchange rate risk; and international portfolio choice.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201

Not offered in 2024

FINA 303 – Derivatives

This course covers options, forward contracts, futures contracts, and other common derivative contracts. Topics include how these contracts work, how they are used, and how they are priced.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) QUAN 371

Not offered in 2024

FINA 303 – Derivatives

This course covers options, forward contracts, futures contracts, and other common derivative contracts. Topics include how these contracts work, how they are used, and how they are priced.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202; (X) QUAN 371

Not offered in 2024

FINA 304 – Financial Econometrics

This course develops tools for analysing financial time series and estimating and testing simple financial models, including: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, and generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic (GARCH) models.

15 pts • (P) FINA 202, QUAN201/203 (or MATH 277); (X) QUAN 304

Not offered in 2024

FINA 304 – Financial Econometrics

This course develops tools for analysing financial time series and estimating and testing simple financial models, including: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, and generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic (GARCH) models.

15 pts • (P) FINA 202, QUAN201/203 (or MATH 277); (X) QUAN 304

Not offered in 2024

FINA 305 – Investments

This course examines the problem of portfolio management confronted by individuals and pension plans. Topics covered include preferences for risk, valuation of stocks, portfolio allocation, and an introduction to derivative pricing. The course aims to provide students with the tools necessary to work in this area, along with a solid grounding in the financial theory behind the models used.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202

1/3 • CRN 18057 • Wed 11.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 305 – Investments

This course examines the problem of portfolio management confronted by individuals and pension plans. Topics covered include preferences for risk, valuation of stocks, portfolio allocation, and an introduction to derivative pricing. The course aims to provide students with the tools necessary to work in this area, along with a solid grounding in the financial theory behind the models used.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202

FINA 306 – Financial Economics

This course bridges the gap between undergraduate and honours-level study in economics and finance. It reinforces and extends the theoretical basis of decision making as it applies to asset pricing and corporate finance. It is intended for students who have an interest in pursuing honours-level study in economics and finance at VUW.

15 pts • (P) B or better in ECON 201; QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

1/3 • CRN 18178 • Mon, Wed 3.30-4.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 306 – Financial Economics

This course bridges the gap between undergraduate and honours-level study in economics and finance. It reinforces and extends the theoretical basis of decision making as it applies to asset pricing and corporate finance. It is intended for students who have an interest in pursuing honours-level study in economics and finance at VUW.

15 pts • (P) B or better in ECON 201; QUAN 102 (or MATH 177 or STAT 193); QUAN 111 or (MATH 141/142, 151)

FINA 307 – Risk Management and Insurance

Selected topics in risk management, banking and insurance; the use of financial and insurance markets to transfer and share risk; financial risk management case studies; regulation of finance, banking and insurance markets; recent developments in financial markets.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201/202/203/211; (X) QUAN 371

Not offered in 2024

FINA 307 – Risk Management and Insurance

Selected topics in risk management, banking and insurance; the use of financial and insurance markets to transfer and share risk; financial risk management case studies; regulation of finance, banking and insurance markets; recent developments in financial markets.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201/202/203/211; (X) QUAN 371

Not offered in 2024

FINA 308 – The Economics of Banking

This course begins by introducing the fundamental concept of a bank and its key functions. Subsequently, it delves into the management of risks such as bank run risk, liquidity risk, and systemic risk. Finally, the course examines the evolved bank regulatory framework stemming from the global financial alongside the complexities presented by digital currencies and fintech advancements.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201/202/203/211

2/3 • CRN 18059 • Tue, Thu 1.30-2.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 308 – The Economics of Banking

This course begins by introducing the fundamental concept of a bank and its key functions. Subsequently, it delves into the management of risks such as bank run risk, liquidity risk, and systemic risk. Finally, the course examines the evolved bank regulatory framework stemming from the global financial alongside the complexities presented by digital currencies and fintech advancements.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201/202/203/211

FINA 309 – Entrepreneurial Finance

Financial tools needed to start, build and exit a new venture. How and where to obtain financing to launch and develop a new business. Valuation and security design used by venture capitalists.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201 or 211, or (FINA 101 and ACCY 130)

3/3 • CRN 33281 • Mon, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea], Mon, Thu 12.30-1.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 309 – Entrepreneurial Finance

Financial tools needed to start, build and exit a new venture. How and where to obtain financing to launch and develop a new business. Valuation and security design used by venture capitalists.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201 or 211, or (FINA 101 and ACCY 130)

FINA 310 – Behavioural Finance

The traditional framework for thinking about financial markets assumes that all market participants are fully rational. However, a recently emerging paradigm, behavioural finance, argues that many financial phenomena are the result of less than fully rational thinking. This course revisits basic topics in finance from a behavioural finance perspective.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202 (X) FINA 350 in 2018-2021;

2/3 • CRN 34136 • Tue, Thu 11.30-12.30 [Pipitea]

FINA 310 – Behavioural Finance

The traditional framework for thinking about financial markets assumes that all market participants are fully rational. However, a recently emerging paradigm, behavioural finance, argues that many financial phenomena are the result of less than fully rational thinking. This course revisits basic topics in finance from a behavioural finance perspective.

15 pts • (P) FINA 201, 202 (X) FINA 350 in 2018-2021;

FINA 311 – New Zealand Financial System

The financial system plays a key role in the economy, facilitating the intermediation of savings and investment, transactions and risk management. The course gives an understanding of the New Zealand financial system, its functions, structure, current issues and the regulatory framework. The course also considers the credit cycle, its interaction with the real economy, and financial stabilisation policies.

15 pts • (P) FINA 202 (X) FINA 351 in 2019-2021;

1/3 • CRN 34137 • Thu 8.30-9.30 [Pipitea], Fri 2.30-3.30pm [Pipitea]

FINA 311 – New Zealand Financial System

The financial system plays a key role in the economy, facilitating the intermediation of savings and investment, transactions and risk management. The course gives an understanding of the New Zealand financial system, its functions, structure, current issues and the regulatory framework. The course also considers the credit cycle, its interaction with the real economy, and financial stabilisation policies.

15 pts • (P) FINA 202 (X) FINA 351 in 2019-2021;

French

FHSS 110 – Exploring the World through Languages and Cultures

How do languages and cultures interrelate, and how can we read them in the world around us? This course provides students with insights into how languages and cultures shape and reflect identity by critically engaging with a wide variety of global texts and objects located in New Zealand’s capital city and beyond. Texts are studied in English translation.

20 pts

3/3 • CRN 33030 • [Distance]

FREN 101 – French Language 1A

An intensive course designed for beginners and those with little prior knowledge of French, covering all four skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking. On completing this course, students will have gained knowledge of basic French grammar and vocabulary equivalent to proficiency level A1 in the Common European Framework, or to NCEA level 1.

20 pts • (X) at least 14 credits at NCEA Level 2 French, or equivalent, as determined by the academic teaching staff in French

1/3 • CRN 26113 • Mon, Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

FREN 102 – French Language 1B

An intensive course that continues the work begun in FREN 101 in all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking. On completing this course, students will have knowledge of basic French grammar and understand a range of vocabulary approximately equivalent to level A2 in the Common European Framework, or to NCEA level 2; or NCEA Level 3 credits (with merit or excellence).

20 pts • (P) FREN 101 or at least 14 credits at NCEA Level 2; or NCEA level 3 French, or equivalent, as determined by the academic staff teaching French; (X) FREN 113

2/3 • CRN 26114 • Tue, Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

FREN 104 – French Society and Culture

This is a French civilisation course which aims to provide students with a general knowledge of French geography, history, past and present culture and social and political issues. No knowledge of French is required. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

LANG 101 – Shaping the World: Cultural Forces in Europe and Latin America

This course introduces students to themes central to the study of the cultures of the French, German, Italian and Spanish-speaking worlds. Cultural case studies will allow students to draw out commonalities without losing sight of historical, political and socio-cultural specificities. The course is taught and assessed entirely in English.

20 pts

Not offered in 2024

FHSS 210 – Language Study Abroad

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 100-level points at Victoria. The course is available both to students who have studied the language before and to students with no previous knowledge of the language. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points at 100-level and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 28218 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FREN 201 – French Language 2A

This course builds on work done in FREN 102 in all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking. By the end of the course, students will have acquired a sound knowledge of French syntax and vocabulary approximately equivalent to level A2-B1 in the Common European Framework or to more than 20 credits at NCEA level 3 with merit or excellence.

20 pts • (P) FREN 102 or 14 credits at NCEA Level 3 French with merit or excellence, or equivalent, as determined by the academic staff teaching French

1/3 • CRN 26115 • Mon, Wed 3-4pm [Kelburn]

FREN 202 – French Language 2B

This course develops skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking to an intermediate level while preparing students for more advanced language learning. By the end of this course, students will acquire knowledge of French syntax and vocabulary approximately equivalent to level B1 in the Common European Framework.

20 pts • (P) FREN 201 or 20 credits at NCEA level 3 French with merit or excellence, or equivalent, as determined by the academic staff teaching French

2/3 • CRN 26116 • Wed, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

FREN 221 – French Literary Studies

Selected 20th- and 21st-century texts studied in their social and historical context. The course will develop students' ability to write about these texts in a critical, informed and persuasive manner. 100% internal assessment.

20 pts • (P) FREN 102, or 14 credits at NCEA Level 3 French with merit or excellence, or equivalent, as determined by the academic staff teaching French

Not offered in 2024

LANG 201 – Capital Cities: Their Cultures and Stories

A course that charts the physical and cultural landscapes of some of the world’s most exciting cities and explores the changing histories of their peoples. This course is recommended for all students interested in cultural exchange. It is taught entirely in English and fulfils major requirements for students of European Languages and Cultures.

20 pts • (P) 40 points

2/3 • CRN 30038 • Mon 1-3pm [Kelburn]

LANG 202 – Moving the World: Artistic Movements in Context

This course introduces students to major artistic movements that represent key moments in the cultural histories of the French, German, Italian and Spanish-speaking worlds. Artefacts such as literary texts and art works will be studied in relation to historical and political contexts and prevailing intellectual currents in the source-language community. The course is taught and assessed entirely in English.

20 pts • (P) 40 points

Not offered in 2024

FHSS 310 – Study Abroad for Language Students

This course involves language study at an approved overseas institution and is available to students who have completed 40 points of relevant language acquisition courses at Victoria. 100% internal assessment based on a portfolio completed abroad and an essay and presentation upon return to NZ.

20 pts • (P) 40 points of language study at 200-level or higher and permission Head of School

3/3 • CRN 25151 • ^ [Kelburn]

^ Limited entry course

FREN 301 – French Language 3A

This course extends work done in FREN 202 in all four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. By the end of this course, students will have acquired a sound knowledge of French grammar, syntax and vocabulary approximately equivalent to level B2 (part 1) in the Common European Framework.

20 pts • (P) FREN 202

1/3 • CRN 26118 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

FREN 302 – French Language 3B

This course extends work done in FREN 301 in reading, writing, listening and speaking. By the end of this course, students will have attained an advanced level of skill in applying their knowledge of French grammar and vocabulary at a level approximately equivalent to level B2 (part 2) in the Common European Framework.

20 pts • (P) FREN 301

Not offered in 2024

FREN 331 – 19th & 20th-Century French Literature

This course aims to encourage critical reading and understanding of the prescribed texts with an emphasis on various critical approaches, and to develop students' ability to write about those texts in a critical, informed and persuasive manner.

20 pts • (P) FREN 202, or equivalent, as determined by the academic staff teaching French

Not offered in 2024

FREN 332 – 20th-Century French World Literature

This course aims to foster your critical reading, comprehensive understanding, and effective communication skills, encompassing both written and verbal expression. You will engage deeply with selected cultural sources, enhancing your ability to analyse and discuss these works in a critical, informed and persuasive manner. The curriculum will highlight the intricate relationship between language and culture, providing insights into the lived experiences of people in Francophone societies around the globe. Through this approach, you will gain a broader appreciation of the cultural contexts and communicative practices that shape the French-speaking world.

20 pts • (P) FREN 202, or equivalent, as determined by the academic staff teaching French

2/3 • CRN 1568 • Mon, Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn], Fri 12-1pm [Kelburn]

FREN 333 – 17th and 18th-Century French Literature

Selected 17th and 18th century texts studied in their social and historical context.

20 pts • (P) FREN 202, or equivalent, as determined by the academic staff teaching French

Not offered in 2024

Game Design

COMP 103 – Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms

This course focuses on the techniques for designing, building and analysing computer programs that deal with large collections of data. The course addresses techniques for programming with collections of data, and the data structures and algorithms needed to implement these collections. The course expands programming skills and provides an understanding of the principles of data abstraction, algorithm design, and the analysis of algorithms fundamental to computer science.

15 pts • (P) COMP 102 or 112

2/3 • CRN 945 • Mon, Wed 5-6pm [Kelburn], Thu 3-4pm [Kelburn]

3/3 • CRN 7223 • [Kelburn]

lab tba

DSDN 101 – Design Visualisation / Pohewatanga ā-Hoahoa

This course will use a range of visualisation methods to represent design concepts and elements. Methods used include hand drawing, photography, motion graphics, animation and video.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17120 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 102 – Game, Animation and Motion Design / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu, ā-Pakiwaituhi, ā-Ranga

This course will introduce students to basic principles of game design, animation and motion design. Fundamental game design concepts, such as mechanics and loops, will be explored and analysed to enable students to conceptualise and develop playable games. Alongside game design this course also introduces introductory motion principles, visual design for motion, storyboarding/sequential imagery and graphic animation.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 34100 • [Te Aro]

DSDN 103 – Critical Approaches to Design Communication/ Tukanga Arohaehae Kōrero ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to the role of visual and written communication in contemporary design practice. A range of techniques will be taught to help students communicate design concepts, critical thinking, and design processes to develop and clearly articulate their creative ideas and observations.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 34118 • Wed 8.30-9.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 104 – Digital Fabrication / Waihanga Matihiko

In this course students engage with emerging technologies to visualise and create 3D forms, bodies and spaces. Students address the distinctive features of creating form and making digitally fabricated artefacts.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17152 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 111 – Design Composition / Hanganga ā-Hoahoa

This course introduces students to, and develops their fluency in, design vocabularies and composition specific to the configuration of design elements. Analogue and digital techniques are used to explore body, space, form and movement.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17123 • ^ [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 132 – Design Narratives and Visual Storytelling / Paki ā-Hoahoa me te Pakiwaitara ā-Ataata

This course introduces students to narratives and storytelling in the context of visual design. Students will be exposed to a range of traditional and contemporary examples including Māori storytelling practice and examples from film, animation, digital and physical games and comics. Students will explore and apply the principles, structures and techniques introduced in class through linear and non-linear storytelling exercises.

15 pts • (X) ANFX 101

2/3 • CRN 27178 • ^ Wed 12.30-1.30pm [Te Aro], Fri 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Fri 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 141 – Design Mediums and Processes / Ngā Huarahi me Ngā Tukanga ā-Hoahoa

This course focuses on creative exploration of materials and processes. Students will learn various manual and digital techniques and apply these to the exploration and production of expressive forms.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17126 • Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

DSDN 142 – Creative Coding and AI I / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga I

This course introduces students to the concepts and fundamentals of interactive visual perception through creative coding and AI for interactive interfaces. Students will develop their own visual, animated, multimedia and interactive design solutions to address an array of design problems.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 17154 • ^ Mon 1.30-2.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 151 – Graphic Design and Photography / Hoahoa Whakanikoniko me te Whakaahuatanga

This course explores the basics of graphic design and photography through hands-on projects. Students are introduced to professional design practice through the use of a brief, design processes, and critique. Using design software, as well as sketching and photography, students will produce a variety of visual works that express visual identity and voice.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 30061 • Mon 1.30-4.30pm [Te Aro], Wed 2.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 33344 • tba [Te Aro]

DSDN 153 – Fashion Systems and Ecologies / Pūnaha me te Hauropi ā-Kākahu

In this introductory course students will learn the principles of fashion design by researching material properties and developing design models that lead to the production of wearable forms. Emphasis is placed on pattern design methods, covering a range of approaches. Historical and cultural theories related to fashion, including Mātauranga Māori (framed in Transition Design), will be presented and discussed, providing students a context for understanding how cultures react to fashion design.

15 pts • (X) FADN 101

2/3 • CRN 32100 • ^ Tue 1.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 171 – Design in a Global Context / Hoahoa i te Horopaki o te Ao Whānui

By observing and analysing historical approaches and responses in and between cultures and design, students will explore design from a place-based perspective.

15 pts

1/3 • CRN 17129 • Wed 9.30-10.30 [Te Aro], Wed 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Wed 11.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

3/3 • CRN 31178 • [Distance]

DSDN 172 – Whakapapa Design I

This course is deeply rooted in Māori culture. Whakapapa Design emphasises ethical behaviour and the consequences of our actions as designers. Whakapapa Design highlights interconnections between people, place, and all living entities and offers a path to restore the health and well-being of both people and the planet through narrative, making, language, and shared values. Whakapapa Design is guided by the Māori tikanga; whakawhanaungatanga and manaakitanga.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 30062 • Mon 10.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 211 – Character Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Kiripuaki I

This course offers an introduction to animated storytelling through the art of character animation. We survey a range of animated films in various genres and styles, from large scale studio features to experimental auteur films. In response students will create their own animated films by designing, building and rigging characters, and through animation bring their creations to life on the screen. Students will gain insight into animated film production workflows and will acquire the technical skills to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 pts including DSDN 102 (DSDN 132 prior to 2024) and 15 further pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 31162 • ^ Fri 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 221 – Digital 2D Animation I / Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua I

This course introduces digital 2D and frame-by-frame techniques in modern animation practice. Historical and contemporary examples will be studied including classic feature films, independent shorts, music videos, and video games. Students will apply basic animation principles and learn introductory 2D techniques within a digital workflow, suitable to professional or personal practice.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA/COMP courses

2/3 • CRN 32097 • ^ Tue 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 211 – Drawing I / Tuhi Pikitia I

This course will allow students to practice traditional and contemporary approaches to both observational and imaginative drawing. In addition to building on skills and techniques developed in earlier courses, students will be encouraged to nurture their personal practice and develop their creative voice through drawing.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 30073 • ^ Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 241 – Visual Narratives / Ngā Paki Ataata

This course focuses on the structure and methods of effective storytelling, as expressed visually. Readings provide a broad survey of stories that employ visual narratives in innovative or instructive ways. Techniques are drawn from comics, books, graphic novels, film, children's books, and animation.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 45 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

1/3 • CRN 33125 • ^ Tue 2.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

DSDN 271 – Pathways to Research / Ngā Ara Rangahau

This course introduces a variety of design research methods and discusses how, when and where these approaches may be utilised in the design process. Topics for discussion and research will include social and cultural bias, human behaviour, and the relationship between analogue and digital technologies. This course engages Whakawhanaungatanga (to generate meaningful connections) between design disciplines. It encourages students to develop a critical appreciation of research within design and discusses designing for and with others.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including DSDN 171

Not offered in 2024

GAME 201 – Game Design I / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu I

Students are introduced to indie games, arcade games and early home console experiences as a pathway to understanding the fundamental requirements of game design. This course builds upon game mechanics and core loops, utilising these concepts to create fully formed and engaging gaming experiences. Students will use game design software and establish intermediate game programming knowledge, and gain the capabilities to ideate, pitch concepts, and develop playable 2D games using a variety of software applications.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 102 or COMP 103 and 30 further pts from the BDI, BAS or BBSc schedules; (X) MDDN 221, 243

1/3 • CRN 35012 • Tue 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro]

GAME 202 – Digital Asset Creation: Auaha Huarawa Matihiko

This course will allow students to explore and develop art and animation assets for game design with a focus on optimisation and working within the limitations that real time hardware can often impose. Students will learn the history of developing real-time assets and will be introduced to a variety of methods to create efficient work for game development. Over the duration of the course students will produce a variety of real time assets in both 2D and 3D, exploring and experimenting with different techniques in optimisation and developing an understanding of game art workflow.

15 pts • (P) 75 points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 35009 • Tue, Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

GAME 203 – Game Prototyping – Design: Tauira Whakamātau ā-Kēmu – Hoahoa

This course uses game jams and hackathons as a learning environment where students work with commercial developers to learn how to develop new and innovative game prototypes. Design students will be collaborating with students from the Graphics and Games major.

15 pts • (P) DSDN 102 or COMP 103 (X) CGRA 259 taken concurrently

1+2+3/3 • CRN 35010 • Fri 3.30-5.30pm [Te Aro], [Te Aro]

GAME 204 – Writing for Games

This course focuses on the craft of writing fiction and narrative design for interactive media, including video games, interactive fiction, board games, and VR. No previous experience with Game Design and/or Script/Writing is required. Students play and analyse contemporary story-driven games and experiences. Students learn digital tools for crafting interactive narratives and producing games prototypes. 

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI, BAS or BBSc schedules or CGRA, FILM, WRIT, THEA, ENGL, LCCM courses

2/3 • CRN 36149 • Wed 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

MDDN 222 – Virtual Reality Design / Taupuni Ao Hoahoa

Students are introduced to the histories and technical development of Virtual Reality both as a field of inquiry and as a creative platform for novel and engaging multimedia experiences. Topics include examples of VR from a variety of fields such as science, cinematography and new media arts. Students will critically evaluate contemporary VR environments using state of the art technology including a variety of hardware platforms.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 32110 • ^ Mon, Wed 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 242 – Creative Coding and AI II / Waehere ā-Auaha II

This course focuses on working with simple algorithms to generate visuals, as well as compositing different media, such as photography. Inspired by real world phenomena, this course uses parameterised design and generative modelling to produce creative coded design solutions. AI tools will be used in this course to support both design workflows and code reviews.

15 pts • (P) 75 pts including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules and including one of (DSDN 142, COMP 102, 112)

1/3 • CRN 19917 • ^ Tue 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro], Thu 9.30-11.30 [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

ANFX 311 – Character Animation II / Pakiwaituhi ā-Kiripuaki II

This course builds on Character Animation I and examines the art of character animation in depth. Students survey a range of animated film across genres and styles, with a focus on contemporary animation. Students will design, build, and rig characters, and bring these to life on the screen. Students will refine their technical skills and deepen their understanding of animation film production workflows in order to bring their story ideas to fruition.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 211

1/3 • CRN 32003 • Mon 9.30-12.30 [Te Aro]

ANFX 321 – Digital 2D Animation II/Pakiwaituhi Matihiko Ahurua II

This course expands upon the practice of digital 2D and frame-by-frame animation in digital workflow. Students will learn intermediate animation principles and techniques for digital 2D production and its effective synthesis with other forms of animation and moving image. In addition to hands-on animation practice in the studio, students will watch, analyse, and discuss examples from a variety of contemporary sources, including film, music videos, and games.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including ANFX 221

2/3 • CRN 33218 • ^ Tue 12.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

COMD 331 – Concept Art and World Building / Toi Ariā me te Waihanga ā-Ao

In this course students will use a variety of techniques to craft concepts and visual images that convey speculative or fictional worlds. Contemporary and historical approaches to concept art will be critically analysed. World building across media (illustration, graphic novels, film, animation, books, and games) will be explored through examples and exercises.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or FILM/THEA/WRIT courses or permission of Head of School

Not offered in 2024

GAME 301 – Game Design II / Hoahoa ā-Kēmu II

In this course students will build on the knowledge gained in Game Design I to design within the expanded parameters of a 3D environment. Using games as a medium of exploration, including examples from the early transitional period of 2D to 3D gaming as design precedents, students will gain a broader comprehension of contemporary gaming as the medium continues to develop.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including GAME 201 (X) MDDN 321, MDDN 343

1/3 • CRN 36014 • Mon, Wed 12.30-2.30pm [Te Aro]

GAME 302 – Game Engines for Design / Pūkaha Kēmu mō to Hoahoa

Students will use and explore the game engine as a design tool. Creating data visualisations and virtual exhibition spaces, students will engage with the game engine in ways both useful to game designers, animators, user experience architects and media designers more broadly.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points Including 30pts from the BDI or BAS schedules or CGRA 252 (X) CCDN 344, MDDN 344

Not offered in 2024

GAME 390 – Game Design Capstone: Whakatinana ā-Wheako Hoahoa ā-Kēmu

In this course students will develop and build large scale video game concepts in collaborative, interdisciplinary teams. Design students will be collaborating with students from the Graphics and Games major. Students will apply their respective skills and knowledge from previous courses in order to develop a refined playable game output. During production students will document their development, their contribution and critically reflect on their design process. This courses is offered for the first time in 2024.

30 pts • (P) DSDN 371, GAME 301 (X) CGRA 359 taken concurrently

2/3 • CRN 35011 • Tue, Thu 3.30-6pm [Te Aro]

MDDN 314 – Audio-Visual Space / Whaitua Ataata-Rongo

Students will investigate processes and strategies involved in the production of time-based media, including audio recording, editing and manipulation techniques. Revolving around the topic of audio-visual space, course projects will allow students to explore the psychology of perception and concepts of spatiality within audio and video design.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including 30 pts from the BDI or BAS schedules

2/3 • CRN 19914 • ^ Mon, Fri 11.30-1.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

MDDN 342 – Creative Coding and AI III / Waehere ā-Auaha me te Atamai Hangahanga III

Creative Coding III builds on the content taught in Creative Coding I and II and extends the use of procedural and parameterised design strategies and AI tools. Students will be taught advanced computer graphics and data mapping techniques in order to create dynamic visuals and assets for use in screen-based media. AI tools use and prompt engineering will also be deployed to advance code design workflows.

15 pts • (P) 60 200-level points including MDDN 242

1/3 • CRN 28190 • ^ Tue 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro], Thu 1.30-3.30pm [Te Aro]

^ Limited entry course

Gender and Sexuality Studies

ANTH 201 – Gender, Sexuality and Kinship

This course examines anthropological approaches to kinship, sexuality and gender. It will explore the shifting social norms surrounding gender, sexuality, the family and relatedness across diverse cultural settings. It will reveal how practices of gender, sexuality and kinship intersect with new reproductive technologies, media, nationalism, capitalism, colonisation, class and race.

20 pts • (P) 20 ANTH pts or GLBL 101 or 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule

1/3 • CRN 30010 • Fri 1-3pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 211 – Myth and Storytelling

A study of the diverse functions of myth and storytelling in Greek and Roman literature and society, and the intersection of mythical and rational modes of thought.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts; (X) CLAS 311

1/3 • CRN 6652 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

SACS 202 – Gender and Sexuality Studies: Key Thinkers and Perspectives

This course will examine the major influences on and developments in feminist theory and gender and sexuality studies up to the present day. Among the topics considered are: gender and sexual difference and diversity, sexual politics and sexuality, the relationships between gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity and class, and postmodernism and post-feminism. These topics are explored in a global and cross-cultural context, through close engagement with the writings of key thinkers in the field.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from Part A of the BA Schedule or GLBL 101

2/3 • CRN 25079 • Mon, Thu 11-12 [Kelburn]

SOSC 215 – Reproducing Gendered Bodies

This course will examine gender relations from a sociological perspective. It will draw on a variety of approaches and perspectives to examine key concepts, issues and themes in contemporary gender studies. Readings, lectures and tutorials will focus on a new topic each week. Topics will include: knowledge, experience, identity, sex, gender, embodiment, reproduction, intimacy, consumption, parenting, home, and work. This course may also be able to be taken towards a minor in SPOL or GNSX.

20 pts • (P) 20 pts from SOSC 102-112; 20 points from Part A of the BA Schedule; (X) SOSC 315, SPOL 215, 315

Not offered in 2024

SOSC 223 – Reflecting on Violence

This course familiarises students with social theories of violence and security in various contexts, paying particular attention to the gendered dynamics of violence. We consider topics such as state violence, torture, terrorism, sexual violence, violence toward children and intimate partner violence. We debate the ethical and methodological issues involved in researching violence and social policies aimed at reducing violence.

20 pts • (P) (20 pts from SOSC 102-112 and 20 further pts from Part A of the BA schedule) or GLBL 101 (X) SOSC 217 in 2013-2016

1/3 • CRN 29126 • Mon 3-4pm [Kelburn]

CLAS 311 – Myth and Storytelling

A study of the diverse functions of myth and storytelling in Greek and Roman literature and society, and the intersection of mythical and rational modes of thought. Co-taught with CLAS 211. Offered in alternate years.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from CLAS/GREE/LATI 200–299; (X) CLAS 211

1/3 • CRN 6653 • Mon 12-1pm [Kelburn], Wed 12-1pm [Kelburn]

CRIM 313 – Women, Crime and Social Control

The study of women's involvement and experiences within the criminal justice system and its social control implications. Topics include women as offenders, women as victims, and women as criminal justice professionals.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299 (or SACS 202); one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

2/3 • CRN 3091 • Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

CRIM 324 – Sexual Violence

This course is designed to introduce students to the issues and concepts central to an understanding of sexual violence. The focus of the course is on the study of adult rape/sexual assault and child sexual abuse. The course explores the causes, characteristics and consequences of sexual violence, examining issues for both the victims and offenders of these crimes. Topics covered may include theories of sexual offending, criminal justice system responses, victim impacts and survival, rape prevention, and offender treatment programmes.

20 pts • (P) 20 points from CRIM 200-299 (or SACS 202); one further 200-level course from Part A of the BA Schedule, LAWS or PSYC

Not offered in 2024

FILM 302 – Cinema and Representation

This course examines how cinema represents issues such gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality and/or class in a critical manner.

20 pts • (P) 40 200-level FILM pts or 40 PASI pts; (X) FILM 336

Not offered in 2024

GEOG 312 – Race, Gender and Development

This course explores people’s experiences of development in relation to race, gender and sexuality in Aotearoa New Zealand and other places in the world. We engage feminist, queer, postcolonial, Kaupapa Māori and Mana Wahine theories to help us question the workings of power within development and to consider how place makes a difference to development outcomes. Through lectures, tutorial discussions, blogs and assignments, students build capacity in how to engage diverse knowledges and to bring an intersectional analysis to development experience.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 212, 20 further 200-level GEOG pts) or GLBL 201 or 40 approved 200-level pts

1/3 • CRN 6009 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

MDIA 306 – Media, Gender and Sexuality

This course examines the representations, contexts, and politics of gender, sexuality and the media. By interrogating the discourses of gender and sexuality as they are 'mediated' in a variety of forms (including television, film, popular music, social media, advertising), we will examine the construction and disruption of categories of gender and sexual identity, and their intersection with other identity frameworks.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from MDIA 200–299 (or SACS 202)

1/3 • CRN 10437 • Mon 1-3pm [Kelburn]

tut tba

POLS 362 – A Topic in Political Philosophy: Feminist Theory

This course enables students to engage deeply with a broad range of feminist thought. We will first focus on feminist critiques of social/political institutions, then on feminist prescriptions, and finally look at the means feminists have suggested for realising these solutions. Along the way, we will engage a myriad of controversies that have created schisms within feminist thought and practice. This course may also be able to be taken towards majors in INTP or PHIL. See major requirements for details.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from POLS or INTP 200–299; (X) PHIL 362

Not offered in 2024

SOSC 315 – Reproducing Gendered Bodies

This course will examine gender relations from a sociological perspective. It will draw on a variety of approaches and perspectives to examine key concepts, issues and themes in contemporary gender studies. Readings, lectures and tutorials will focus on a new topic each week. Topics will include: knowledge, experience, identity, sex, gender, embodiment, reproduction, intimacy, consumption, parenting, home, and work. This course may also be able to be taken towards a minor in SPOL or GNSX.

20 pts • (P) 40 pts from SACS 200–299, SOSC 200–299; (X) SOSC 215, SPOL 215, 315

Not offered in 2024

Geography

See also Physical Geography

GEOG 112 – (Re)Making Places: Geographies of Development, Equity and Social Change

This course invites you to engage with key concepts and approaches in human geography and development studies relevant to rethinking and creating more just and equitable worlds. Through debate, creative thinking and written assignments, you will make connections between theories, processes and lived experience, and grapple with key contemporary issues such as sustainable transport, climate change migration, social inclusion, and how to address inequalities.

15 pts

2/3 • CRN 1651 • Tue, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 114 – Sustainability: People and Environment

This course focuses on the relationships between people and the (natural and built) environment. We examine a range of contemporary ways of thinking about these relationships, using local and international examples. This course brings together the social and physical sciences to help understand key environmental issues and work towards possible solutions.

15 pts • (X) ENVI 114

1/3 • CRN 7021 • Tue 2-3pm [Kelburn], Fri 2-3pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 212 – Worlds of Development

This course deepens students’ understanding of different theories and approaches to development from around the world by exploring their similarities, differences and intersections. We focus particularly on contemporary approaches to multilateral governance, grassroots action, and transnational organising. Through this focus, students gain a deeper understanding of the key actors, power relations and impacts involved when trying to sustain people’s livelihoods and enable them to live well.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 112 or GLBL 101 or TOUR 101 or approved course

1/3 • CRN 6002 • Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Thu 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 214 – Environmental Futures for Aotearoa New Zealand

This course broadly maps human-nature relationships throughout human history in Aotearoa New Zealand. You will focus on how our relationships as part of the natural world, and our perspectives of them, manifest environmental values and ethics that become embedded in environmental management systems, policy and legislation. By mapping this, the course builds your sense of agency and purpose in Aotearoa New Zealand’s environmental future.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 114 or GLBL 101 or 15 approved points (X) ENVI 214

2/3 • CRN 6004 • Thu, Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 215 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Science

In this hands-on course, dive into real-world data and explore how GIS revolutionizes our understanding of the planet, people, and place. GIS combines the art of mapping, science of data analysis, and spatial understanding. From creating captivating maps to unravelling hidden patterns, you'll develop essential skills in demand in industry.

20 pts • (P) 60 100-level pts

2/3 • CRN 6005 • Wed 2-4pm [Kelburn], Fri 11-12 [Kelburn]

GEOG 216 – Urban Geography

This course explores the main concepts and applications associated with the study of contemporary urban geography.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 112, 15 approved 100-level pts

Not offered in 2024

GEOG 217 – Human Geography: Approaching Our World

In this course, students delve deeply into the diverse viewpoints adopted by human geographers when studying local and global issues, both past and present. Examples of such issues include housing pressures, spatial justice (or injustice), place identity, and the complex relationship between people and nature. The course examines the value and practical relevance of adopting human geography lenses when seeking to understand and/or change our world.

20 pts • (P) (GEOG 112; ENVI/GEOG 114 or 15 approved 100-level pts) or GLBL 101

2/3 • CRN 26056 • Mon, Fri 3-4pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 220 – Hydrology and Climate

This course provides the skills and training necessary to explore and understand the core hydrological and climatic processes that cause change within the environment, particularly the role of water. It will help you to understand why climate varies spatially, and why vegetation has such an important influence on the availability and timing of moisture and stream flow. It will also examine how hydrological and climatic systems respond to human interaction and environmental change. The emphasis will be on providing the skills necessary to interpret the processes controlling the spatial and temporal variability in climate and water availability.

20 pts • (P) ENVI/GEOG 114, ESCI/ GEOG 111, 15 pts from (MATH 132–177, PHYS 131, STAT 193, or equivalent)

2/3 • CRN 17169 • Mon, Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

GEOG 222 – Ecology and Environment

An introduction to the principles of Ecology and Environmental Science, including a required week-long field trip in the mid-trimester break. The course will focus on physical and biological processes in terrestrial environments and ecosystem functioning. The field trip will introduce techniques relevant to field-based enquiry in ecological and environmental science. Also taught as BIOL 222.

20 pts • (P) STAT 193, 30 pts from (BIOL 111, 113, 114, 132, ENVI/GEOG 114, ESCI/GEOG 111, ESCI 112) (X) BIOL/ENVI 222

1/3 • CRN 26059 • Mon, Wed 1-2pm [Kelburn], Tue 1-2pm [Kelburn], Fri 1-2pm [Kelburn]

GEOG 224 – Geomorphology

The course describes geomorphic processes and the landforms created by them. It will include a comprehensive review of the major processes shaping planetary surfaces by water, wind and ice. These concepts will be illustrated using case studies from Earth and other terrestrial planets.

20 pts • (P) ESCI/GEOG 111, 15 points from (MATH 132-177, PHYS 131, STAT 193, STAT 292)

Not offered in 2024

SCIE 212 – To be confirmed

15 pts

Not offered in 2024

GEOG 312 – Race, Gender and Development

This course explores people’s experiences of development in relation to race, gender and sexuality in Aotearoa New Zealand and other places in the world. We engage feminist, queer, postcolonial, Kaupapa Māori and Mana Wahine theories to help us question the workings of power within development and to consider how place makes a difference to development outcomes. Through lectures, tutorial discussions, blogs and assignments, students build capacity in how to engage diverse knowledges and to bring an intersectional analysis to development experience.

20 pts • (P) GEOG 212, 20 further 200-level GEOG pts) or GLBL 201 or 40 approved 200-level pts

1/3 • CRN 6009 • Tue 10-11 [Kelburn], Wed 10-11 [Kelburn]

GEOG 313 – Geographies of New Zealand

GEOG 313 studies human geographies of New Zealand, including demography, historical geography, political economy, economic geography, industrial geography, rural geography, social geography and urban geography, in both historical and contemporary settings. For final year students it will advance their knowledge of contemporary geographical processes in the New Zealand environment. For foreign, exchange or graduate students it will give them an advanced introduction to geographical context of the country in which they are studying. See course content information for dates.

20 pts • (P) 20 200-level GEOG pts or approved courses for non-GEOG majors (X) GEOG 311

3/3 • CRN 18579 • Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9-12 [Kelburn]

GEOG 314 – Global Environmental Justice

All environmental problems have human dimensions. Throughout this course, we will build an understanding of environmental issues as social issues by focussing on environmental justice. We will explore the causes of environmental problems, how problems are understood and ex